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1

I have noticed that when I read sheet music, I always have to start by seeing where C would be on the sheet music to orient myself and then go from there. I don't think it is too important to know the name of the note you are playing as long as you are playing the note you want to play


1

I've noticed that my mind always wants to make shortcuts when reading music. I rarely ever actually think about, or consciously process, what pitch the notes are in the sheet music. This is completely normal. It's how minds work. When you see three apples sitting on a table you're more likely to process that as one triangle with an apple at each vertex. ...


3

You're doing fine. It's like reading words. You don't spell out C-A-T any more, do you? You read 'cat'. It's the same in music. If I come across something like this: I might have to stop and work out the letter names. Maybe even pencil them in! But otherwise, it's look-and-play. No-one spells the notes out consciously. It would take far too long!


0

Playing by luck or supposition is definitely not a good thing, because the piece carries a certain idea together with a certain aesthetic. For instance your ability with Ligeti etudes or Scriabin sonatas on piano will definitely be a strong drawback. Not being able to say if you played something by chance is definitely a drawback. However, if subconsciously ...


5

It's very similar to touch typing, where eventually, one doesn't even bring to mind what the letter is one just knows where it lives on the keyboard. The same with sight reading - although maybe somewhat easier, with fewer letter names to consider! The big difference is in the execution. Right now, you're just hitting the right notes - well done. But at a ...


4

They belong to "another voice" in a metaphorical sense. You still play them on the piano, but you want them to sound as an independent voice from the other "voices". When multiple voices are present on the same staff, the stem directions tell you which voice is which. It is possible for an inner voice to move from one hand to the other (i....


3

When you read English (or whatever your native language is, assuming it's alphabetic), do you read the letters individually and sound them out to form words? Of course not; long ago you achieved reading fluency. Same with music - with enough practice you just look at the score and automatically play what's in front of you. It doesn't matter if one staff is ...


8

I learned the treble clef first by a long way. I learned it by the mnemonic FACE. When I eventually came to learn the bass clef I simply used the mnemonic ACEG. After quite a short while it just became natural. I didn't ever do any calculations of any kind. I knew that middle C was shared. Later I connected the lower ledger lines on the treble clef with the ...


3

It's not really wrong but it's better to learn the bass (and alto and tenor a bit later) clef as a thing in itself. Reading and playing piano and organ music helps. The point is to think of the Grand Staff as the object of interest, (for keyboards) with a bass clef, middle C ledger line, then treble clef. Later you can learn the C-clefs. It just takes ...


3

"My question is: what is a 'right' cognitive process to read sheet music fluently? I wonder how one does not confuse reading notes in different clefs." I am not sure there is a 'right' process, or method. Some of the methods we are taught as children are, in my opinion, very flawed and create more distraction than actual learning. The best method ...


4

Don’t read by adding semitones, this is a wrong way. You better start reading the bass clef by studying and practicing a piece like this: Mind that the upper ledger lines of the lower system are the corresponding lower lines of the upper system and vice versa. Study the link In the comment of guidot. The real cognitive insight is not transposing the names ...


1

There will be better answers but for in short I believe your method is okay. Because now you are counting them but soon after you will start to memorize them one by one. In short time it looks efficient. Also to memorize them you can draw a staff and write all notes on it once a day. It may help you to memorize them so that you will stop counting. Also you ...


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