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2

In my opinion it doesn't make a lot of sense to train sight reading by randomly generated notes. Sheet music - in common practice - is composed in scales and chords. So it makes more sense to train sight reading by learning the pictures of chords e.g. triads and arpeggios in root position 1,3,5 (c,e,g and all other chords notated on the lines or between!)...


5

From your question, and the subsequent edits, it is clear you have no idea how fingering on the piano works. I think you have the impression like many beginners do that piano playing starts from a fixed five finger position (like 'C-position' or 'G-position') and then veers out of that. In reality, in most piano-music (that is a bit more complicated than ...


4

Scales fingerings are for scales. Which only get played in practice time and exams. They're designed to allow flowing movement of the hand/fingers. Pieces rarely contain scales - maybe partial scales, but even then, they won't necessarily start and finish as they do when playing 'proper' scales. So, although it's comforting at the moment to do what works ...


9

When sight-reading, your long-term goal should be learning to read and play entire phrases of music, not individual notes. What fingering choice is practical for a specific note might be completely different depending on the phrase. For example: I don't think you would try to play the highlighted D note with any other finger than the thumb of your right ...


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