New answers tagged

1

In addition to Richard's answer, another reason for not jumping straight to the C and landing on it with thumb is that in doing so, some players will just hit it too hard, and make it too pronounced. (Think about learning scales - a lot of us dropped onto the thumb notes too heavily). So, by using 4, holding it and transferrring to thumb, it takes away that ...


5

The 4–1 in the Beethoven indicates that you begin playing that C with your fourth finger, but while playing the C you switch to the first finger. The switch is to help facilitate the upcoming leap to F♯; now that your first finger is on the C, it's easier to reach the F♯ with finger four. (Without the switch, you'd keep 4 on the C and use 5 on the F♯!) Also, ...


10

Phrase marks here rather than slurs. (How would you slur the first four notes?)Yes, in this case where the melody moves between the staves, the phrase applies to the whole melody. But you'd phrase the entire melody that way whether the phrase mark was there or not. But don't try to dissect this sort of writing too minutely. How shall we play those last ...


5

The slurs in this case are serving as phrase markings; notice that they correspond to the punctuation of the lyrics. They also indicate legato playing, and they are intended to apply to both hands. In measures 5 and 6 in particular, the idea is to keep a legato connection of the melody as its notes shift between hands. This arrangement of the song employs a &...


2

Deliberately changing pedal before a new phrase can sometimes result in something not entirely dissimilar to when a choir collectively breathes before a barline - e.g., it can easily create a somewhat stilted/mechanical effect. I'd guess the written pedal marks are an attempt (presumably by an editor and not Chopin) to avoid that to some degree, though my ...


2

Up-down as each chord is played. A subtle lift at the end of each phrase is not a ridiculous idea, but I don't think it's needed here. Rubinstein legato-pedals through. So do all the other YouTube versions I just looked at. That's good enough for me.


2

The usual way is to hold the pedal down to sustain one chord, then play the next, and after that next has been played, change pedal. Rather like the sign shows - the 'pedal up/down' comes directly after the next chord is played, not before or as it's played. Slowing it all down a lot will allow understanding of the actual timing - it's an aquired art ! By ...


6

Ultimately, this is a musical decision, so either way is fine. However,... If you want to play the music literally as written, then you would hold the pedal through, so that there's no break between the two slurred passages. My personal preference, both in this simplified arrangement as well as the original, is to leave a small break — a "breath" — ...


5

It might be a misprint, intended to be the same as on the system below. Is there any pattern in the rest of the page to support this? Otherwise, breaking the slur is meaningless. So it's one sort of bad writing, or another sort of bad writing.


6

Two connected slurs like this are effectively equivalent to a single slur. This is bad notation practice, even though it's often seen. Update: it's a misprint. The first edition looks like this:


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