28

There's a few factors at play here: Let's assume that we have a magical piece of software, which can listen to audio and tell us exactly what notes are being played. Even given this software, determining key is not a trivial problem. Sure, there are simple cases, but even humans disagree over many songs. A computer has no chance. Take Sweet Home Alabama. ...


26

Since you're looking for software to input a score that is still under construction, MuseScore (found at musescore.org) would be my go-to application. It's a GNU-licensed graphical score editor that has playback and range-checking abilities. In case you later want to engrave a finished score with LaTeX-like typographic quality, LilyPond is considered to be ...


22

There is LilyPond which does what you are looking for. It was first released on 1996, but it still gets updates. LilyPond is a computer program and file format for music engraving. One of LilyPond's major goals is to produce scores that are engraved with traditional layout rules, reflecting the era when scores were engraved by hand. LilyPond is ...


20

There are no commercial developers listed for LilyPond right now. That means that you cannot reliably throw money at a particular problem in order to make it go away while relying on the expertise of developers already familiar with LilyPond. Now how reliably can you do that for proprietary software? The problem is that the proprietary software is not ...


19

I'm pretty sure LilyPond can do what you want. It's not the easiest thing to use but since you've already used a text-based system it might not be too bad. Here are some examples and this is also relevant in this case. MuseScore is another free option, which is easier to use and might also be able to do this. EDIT: Here's a lilypond version: And code: ...


16

Simply put, no. If you limit a song to single pure tones, it's pretty easy to write software to recognize them and transcribe it. But once you get to a real instrument things get much harder. Even single notes can be difficult to recognize due to overtones -- the dominant frequency doesn't even need to be the fundamental frequency, which makes it very ...


16

Use \once \set chordChanges = ##f at the location where you want to force the chord symbol. \score { << \new ChordNames { \set chordChanges = ##t \chordmode { \repeat volta 2 {g1} \alternative { {c} {\once \set chordChanges = ##f c4 g c c} } } } \new Voice = "one" { \relative c'' { ...


16

What you are trying to achieve is not a trivial task. If you want a good master it'll take more than some tips. I'll try to do some quick observations on some possibilities. There's nothing specific to Ableton Live, because there's nothing exclusive to Ableton Live in this subject. You want more loudness in your track. As you might know we can't just turn ...


15

Drums have pitches, but by the time they are in the track, then unless it is for very specific purposes, to complement a melodic line etc, then those actual pitches should not be truly apparent to the end-listener. Let the listener just get the 'vibe' of what you intend. They shouldn't really be hearing a 'tune' from the drum pitches, only the apparent ...


15

No doubt both are used, depending on circumstances. Having done some recording in both styles (sequenced/synthesized and live-performance) even with my mediocre performance skills and low-quality hardware, I've still often found performing to be less-labor-intensive than sequencing (to my surprise). If you can find any random half-decent instrumentalist it ...


15

I just watched a series of videos of film composer Hans Zimmer who mocks up all his soundtracks using software and virtual instruments so the directors can hear what it's going to sound like before they record it with a real orchestra or other musicians. He has a control surface with several faders on it, and each fader is mapped to a different MIDI control ...


14

My response will be in part influenced by the information I gathered from reading your profile. My first suggestion to you is to strongly encourage you to learn an instrument. If you're serious about writing music and about having it played by live performers, having a working knowledge of the instruments is important. It is paramount to be technically ...


14

There are 3 separate voices. Voice 1 is the high D-F#-A-G, voice 2 is the middle [eighth rest]-D-A-E-A, and voice 3 is the half notes.


13

Musescore is free as opposed to many other programs such as Sibelius or Finale. However, it is still very good and can do almost everything that paid programs can do. One of the input files accepted in Musescore is MIDI and it can output PDF among other formats. However, as guidot said, it takes a human to do it right because a MIDI file does not contain ...


13

Yes it is possible to have a note that is part of a triplet and dotted for example: In this we're using quarter note triplets. Instead of having them all be 3 even quarter note triplets the first one is dotted and the second one is shortened giving us a triplet consisting of a dotted quarter note followed by an eigth note followed by a quarter note to ...


12

I think you're looking for something like PianoBooster. It displays parts on a scrolling stave in-time with your playing, using standard MIDI files. It can wait for you to hit the correct note, can play the left-hand or right-hand part for you, and lets you adjust the speed to suit you. You can also transpose a part up or down. PianoBooster is free and open ...


12

Check out Lilypond: http://lilypond.org/ It's free and powerful, and although it won't do audio playback, I believe it can do the rest of what you ask. It's text-based, and if you are at all familiar with TeX or LaTeX, Lilypond will feel similar. It has a somewhat steep learning curve, but there are some GUIs in active development that make things easier, ...


12

Several people advise MusicXML here but I don't see that making sense. That is an exchange format, not a format to write music in. In practice, MusicXML export/import works rather tepidly between different applications. I've seen "TuxGuitar" mentioned but the name would strongly suggest a focus on guitar I don't see in question or tags. LilyPond is a ...


12

Making everything audible in the mix is not always possible. Elements that share frequencies will mask each other. The most crucial part of the mix is not actually in the mixing phase itself, but in the composition, instrumentation, and arrangement phase. Experienced composers will give each element its space in the frequency spectrum, so there is little to ...


11

I would recommend you avoid trying to use video. Unless you are 'local' to each other the latency and jitter makes it very difficult to play together. Audio can be encoded with much lower latency and is typically a fixed bandwidth requirement so this copes better with connection issues. Tools like Jamulus (http://sourceforge.net/projects/llcon/) are ...


11

I think I know where is the issue. My Windows-fu is rusty, but here is what I found. Solution, in short Get ASIO multi-client from here or here (they are different, you might want to try both). After installation you should be able to use your interface with more than one program. What is happening? Seems that ASIO in general (including ASIO4ALL) can't ...


11

When using an amp with microphone, it means that you play the guitar through a physical amp, and using a microphone to direct this sound into your recording system. An amp simulator is software that literally simulates an amp; you plug your guitar into your computer (through an interface for better quality), and this sound is modified by the software that ...


11

MIDI is not sound. The MIDI specification does not dictate what any instrument sounds like, it's up to the synthesizer to generate the sound. Free synths sound like crap, but good ones can sound as good as the creators can make them. For example, the Pirates of the Caribbean soundtrack is entirely synthesized, yet most people don't even realize it.


11

A simple google(*) finds the following tutorial: http://www.lesession.co.uk/abc/abc_notation.htm#sharps sharp: ^f flat: _b natural: =c Note that the accidental precedes the note. (*) When googling for information about ABC, it often helps to add the word "notation" to the search, to weed out false positives.


10

I'll answer each of your questions in order: The notes in parentheses are ghost notes. You should play them quietly - certainly don't emphasize them. They do have rhythmic value, however (i.e. they aren't grace notes). The 7 to 9 slide is a legato slide. Pick the 7, then slide to 9, but don't pick again for the 9. The 5-7-5, 7-5-0 are indeed hammer-ons ...


10

With a fast enough tempo, it could be quite a few! :-) Necessarily, you would need to time it out at your score's tempo to find a number, but the clarinet in general has a lot of resistance compared to other wind instruments, so the amount of airflow is relatively small. Depending on the range of the instrument in which this note occurs, a good clarinetist ...


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