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21

First, beware of ethnocentrism. I disagree with your characterization of "real note names". Mi bemol is a real note name, just in a different language. Solfege is used as note names in Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, Romanian, Greek, Russian, Mongolian, Flemish, Persian, Arabic, Hebrew, Ukrainian, Bulgarian and Turkish. (See History of Note Names ...


20

per the first promising looking result from google... http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01262/lessonsolfege.html Chromatic Scale Using sharps - Do, Di, Re, Ri, Mi, Fa, Fi, Sol, Si, La, Li, Ti, Do Using flats - Do, Ra, Re, Me, Mi, Fa, Se, Sol, Le, La, Te, Ti, Do


18

That's because the solfege syllables for the non-chromatic notes (Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si/Ti) were first. They were thoroughly historically anchored in music theory, long before someone thought about adding chromatically altered versions of them. Because most vowels were already used it was very difficult to invent a system 'on top' of the already known ...


14

First off, this notation is known as Solfege, and there are two different types. Fixed Do, where C is always Do, and Movable Do, where the root of the scale you are using is Do. The rest of this answer will focus on Movable Do, as in Fixed Do the answer will differ based on what note you are starting on. The major Solfege syllables are the ones that you ...


11

The diatonic notes, of course, came first. Sometime after that, the chromatic notes were described by the system. (It's important that we use Ti instead of Si, as you'll soon note.) To sharpen notes, the vowel sound in the syllable was changed to i (rhymes with tree), as in Di, Ri, Fi, Si, Li, etc. To flatten notes, the vowel sound was changed to e (rhymes ...


10

I was taught fixed-do solfège as a child, and only found out a few years ago that there is such a thing as movable-do. I have also been familiar with the A-G letter system for many years, and in my head the two systems were simply two different languages describing the same thing. When I come across movable-do descriptions of musical concepts, in posts ...


9

The terminology you're looking for would be Aural Training, Ear Training, or Aural Skills and there is a lot of literature on the subject. Since you seem to want to take a more academic approach to it, I can point you to this course offered online by Berklee College of Music. Also, this textbook seems to take a similar approach as you described. They begin ...


8

There seems to be some (depending on country, author or whatever) variants of the general idea to replace vowels by higher sounding ones for sharps and by lower sounding ones (in extreme case always "u") for flats (which are also simply formed by attaching a "b" for "bemolle" in French, so si→sib). In German wikipedia I found these replacements do→di, re→...


7

An octave is an interval composed of 12 semitones. A semitone is an interval, so they are: C → C#, C# → D, D → D#, D# → E, E → F, F → F#, F# → G, G → G#, G# → A, A → A#, A# → B, B → C. In Solfège: Do → Do#, Do# → Re, Re → Re#, Re# → Mi, Mi → Fa, Fa → Fa#, Fa# → Sol, Sol → Sol#, Sol# → La, La → La#, La# → Ti, Ti → Do. See how you count the intervals, not ...


7

I didn't know about it but I've recently seen this syllables when I was looking up Kodaly. I think Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni Sa is not corresponding to the C D E F G but to the moveale Do Re Mi. yes it is: These seven swaras are shortened to Sa, Ri (Carnatic) or Re (Hindustani), Ga, Ma, Pa, Dha, and Ni. Collectively these notes are known as the sargam (the ...


6

There are two ways to use the do-re-mi note names: Absolute note names Relative note names If you use them as absolute note names, you just call C do, D re etcetera, and if you encounter alterations, use the naming suggested by Babu (although he suggested it in the context of relative note names). If you want to use them as relative note names, Babu ...


6

Can 'do' be any pitch one wishes?, i.e. does this mean everybody chooses their own key to sing in, transposing the music while singing? A movable 'do' can indeed be any pitch, however, in a group setting, the entire group must use the same any pitch. Otherwise, you get unintended multitonality, and chaos! If needed, the group's leader could pick a pitch as '...


6

The Wikipedia page for solfege has an image of the hand signals for each of the fixed-do diatonic notes: Obviously the syllable spellings are a little different from what we would use today. There is probably a more up-to-date resource for this out there.


5

In moveable-do solfège, the usual practice is to indicate sharps with an -i vowel and flats with an -e or -a vowel. For example, a sharp do becomes di, flat sol becomes se, and flat re becomes ra. There are chromatic variants of fixed-do solfège similar to the moveable-do system, but the usual practice in fixed-do is to sing the plain note name without ...


5

The most standard convention I know of is to change the vowel to "i" for sharping and "e" for flatting. The exception is when flatting "re", in which case you go to "ra".


5

Movable Do is called such because it is just that: movable. Movable Do focuses on intervallic relationships. When you change keys, "Do" becomes the new tonal center for that key and all of the other solfege syllables are transposed accordingly. For example, in the key of D, "D" would be "Do". If we changed keys to "F", "F" would now be "Do." Fixed Do ...


5

You can treat the minor tonic as Do of its own scale. Or you can treat it as La of the relative major. Either way, (for anything but the Natural Minor with La as tonic) you'll need 'accidentals'. There are several systems of doing them in solfege. Here's one: The sharpened degrees are sung as Di ('Dee'), Ri, Fi, Si, Li. (There seems no need for a ...


5

Fixed do, as used in France, therefore I'll use the French version, would use diese for sharp, and bemol for flat. So F♯ is called fa-diese, and B♭ is called si-bemol. I don't thnk it's productive to call, as in your first example, both A and A♯ (in movable, key A) as do, because it somewhat defeats the objective.


5

the names are like Tim says correctly "do-dièse" (C#) and "mi bémol" (Eb) etc. These expressions are used to name the key! Examples: Bach: Messe an Si- mineur or: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suites_fran%C3%A7aises Bach: 1.1 Suite française no 1 en ré mineur, BWV 812 1.2 Suite française no 2 en ut mineur, BWV 813 1.3 Suite française no 3 en si ...


4

Solfege has names for altered notes. From fixed Do as C, we have: C# as Di, D# as Ri, F# as Fi, G# as Si, and A# as Li, We also have: Db as Ra, Eb as Me (pronounced "May", not as the English word "Me"), Gb as Se, Ab as Le, and Bb as Te. I'm told (through Wikipedia's Solfège Page) that there are names ...


4

This is just a weird historic mistake. Apparently some people in the middle ages didn't know zero as a number, and hence labelled the zero-interval with 1 (unison). Continuing this through the diatonic scale ends you up with the label 8 (octave) on the equivalence-class interval. But there are not eight notes in an octave of diatonic scale / white keys, ...


4

Since there are no answers and because alephzero's comment helped clarify everything for me, I'll take the liberty of writing my own. This information comes from the manual alephzero provided here. (I didn't even think to look here, so thanks!) Overview The tonic sol–fa system is really more a system of notation than it is a solfège system. So while the ...


4

"Do re mi..." is used in many Romance languages, although "ti" is sometimes "si." Korean uses something with similar consonants. Japanese uses a katakana that is unrelated. So these languages all have a moveable "do." The only language in this table that I don't know the pronunciations for is Thai. Ascribing Latin letters to particular numerical frequencies ...


3

It's pretty straightforward that no-one will be able to sing all the notes found on a piano. So, one finds one's own range, and uses that.Might be an idea in the initial stages to mark a comfortable range. No trouble using chest or head voice - and even falsetto won't go amiss. Since part of the quest is recognising intervals, the octave will be a useful ...


3

I'd guess that H.=H probably means that dotted half gets what half got before. Thus the music speeds up. Unless (as this is non-standard), it means to slow down. The problem is that 6/8 (and this seems correct) for the six Es, 6/8 is usually divided in to two dotted quarter notes. There is no real use of a half note in 6/8 so its confusing (to me).


3

My students and I just had this discussion in spelling fully diminshed seveths. We think the diminished seventh should be TA. Here's why, the flatted seventh is TE, if we make it a double-flatted seventh it makes sense to use TA. It stays in the the TI family and gives a direction towards LA.


3

This depends in large part whether we're talking about "fixed do" or "movable do" solfege, so I'll answer from each perspective: Movable Do In movable-do solfege, the syllables mark the scale degree rather than the absolute pitch of the note, so the syllables used will vary depending on the key in which the chord appears. In practice, diminished seventh ...


3

The simple answer is yes - your application will just need to use some mechanism to refer to the octave used. The solfege system just refers to the 7 notes of the octave, and once you move up to the next octave it begins again.


3

I think the key to this question is: what is your reason for using solfege? The commonest use for solfege, is as an aid to learning vocal parts - especially harmony parts where the main melody can distract you from the harmonising pitches you're supposed to be singing. Having trained yourself to associate the words do,re,mi... with intervals, the words ...


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