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17

tl;dr: You can always guess what notes to play by ear and find what notes sound good, but at the end of the day you are playing in a scale and you should be aware of that. There are some guitarists that don't know scale (or music theory for that matter) and they tend to play by ear. They listen to the progression and try to play something over it and find ...


16

Learning licks and solos by other musicians can be helpful in this respect. Obviously you'll want to develop your own voice, but no musician exists in a vacuum and it's definitely helpful to learn and analyze (if even unconsciously) the kinds of things musicians you admire have played. Depending on your style and the direction you want to go, it may be ...


12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


12

A thing some advanced musicians can do is to listen to the harmony. This will require a bit of advanced ear training, because the chords in Jazz often have many notes and use weird voicings, so a not-so-well trained ear won't be able to pick up the harmony. Ask a bandmate where you are. This might sound bad to you, like you will give off a bad image to your ...


10

The general answer is that pentatonic scales avoid some of the dissonances against the chords that occur naturally in the diatonic scales. For example, suppose you're playing over a C Major chord. Choosing to play a C Major pentatonic gives you the three chord tones, C E G, which are guaranteed to sound good, plus D and A, which are the chordal 9th and 6th, ...


9

You can play pretty much anything, depending on context and what has been established both melodically and harmonically. All modes derived from the mayor scale are commonly used: Lydian easily fits any mayor chord Locrian can be played over V (VII m7b5 as diatonic substitution of V7) Phrygian can easily fit any minor chord (using that b2 as leading tone ...


8

Generally, there are two factors that contribute to quiet playing: 1.) They are insecure with their part - not comfortable physically playing the music. For children, it is often because they don't practice enough. For older kids and adults, it's often because they don't practice enough. :) 2.) Social psychology: by playing as a soloist they are ...


8

With any solo, you want to tell a story. The licks, riffs and grooves are your words. Writers structure stories as narrative arcs. A narrative arc is usually: Exposition: The introduction the story in which characters are introduced, setting is revealed. Rising Action: A series of events that complicate matters for the protagonist, creating a rise in the ...


8

Counting helps a lot. If the passage is 8 bars long, two counts of 1,2,3,4. 2,2,3,4. 3,2,3,4. 4,2,3,4 will keep you together. In a well written song, it should, to a degree, tell you where you are. You should hear the cadences as they approach, and that ought to put you onto the next line , stanza, sentence, call it what you will. EDIT: just realised I didn'...


8

The diatonic chords in minor are: Tonic (A C E) is minor Supertonic (B D F) is diminished Mediant (C E G) is major Subdominant (D F A) is minor Dominant (E G# B) is major Submediant (F A C) is major Leading tone (G# B D) is diminished The key of A minor has zero sharps or flats. However, standard practice is to raise the seventh scale degree of a minor key;...


8

Possibly soli? In my experience, it means a solo for an entire section. For example, a saxophone soli would be a feature for all the saxophones in a big band. Google tells me it has other meanings in different contexts, so it may not be a universally applicable term.


8

...what the Bb chords function is in the end solo as it alternates with the C chord? If it is just going like C Bb C Bb C Bb... then looking for function doesn't make sense. It's static harmonically. You can just call this kind of two chord alternating a vamp. Function in the traditional sense is about predominant to dominant to tonic harmonic progression ...


8

There just isn't a simple graph that could be made - time played against ability to play. Every single person's would be very different! And then there's actual playing ability. Playing any of those songs, do you nail it every time? Could you sit in with other musos and play a song perfectly every time? Would it take you an hour or a month to learn, say, ...


7

I'm hearing two questions: 1) What notes are safe for me to play? 2) What notes are important? While overlapping, these are different questions that will each have a large impact on your solo. The first is easier to answer, but understanding the second will make you a better musician. tl; dr Try them all, but only repeat the notes you like. 1) Safety ...


7

It's a "talk box". It works by projecting the sound coming from the instrument (typically a guitar) into the mouth of the performer (the tube is coupled with a speaker inside the box). The performer then modulates the sound using their mouth, pretty much as if speaking. The resulting sound is captured by a microphone. The resulting effect is similar from ...


6

I think the most important thing you need is to learn how to dive in your guitar's neck without getting lost. Moving around past a certain speed and without watching where your fingers are requires tons of practice. That practice relies in repeating some pattern over and over and over. You can try 1 million solos, practice them, improve and master them and ...


6

Chromatic finger exercises with a metronome will help if your fingers are really weak. This is where you play 4 notes on each string from low (low e) to high (high e), and then back up again to low e. One finger on each fret, and when you have done all 6 strings, you start by moving one note up and do the exercise in the next position. (for example, you ...


6

The soloist should do all of those things. You don't necessarily have to look straight at the conductor though. Peripheral vision can be enough to see the movement of the hands and baton. If you just listen instead of watching too, there's a good chance you'll miss something and not be together with the ensemble. However, the conductor also needs to ...


6

Try listening to existing solos, it's a good start point. You'll notice that they can and do start on any note, although the root is fairly common. There's also the factor of which beat do you start on. Again, it could be and is any beat, or even in between beats. Although the first beat in the bar is fairly common. There are no hard and fast rules - in ...


6

At the beginning, with no chord pattern obvious, it could have been any old song. However, the bass and drums ( and occasional keyboard and possible guitar) shape things into the well-known sequence. Unmistakable. He is actually playing parts of the song and the guitar breaks associated. So, for anyone knowing the song, every so often, they're reminded of ...


6

I wouldn’t call it divisi unless two instruments were playing it. Without seeing more of the piece, my first guess is that you’re right and the lower pitch version is for singers that don’t feel comfortable with the high Bb. Another possibility is only if this section is repeated. It’s possible that the singer is supposed to sing it one way the first time ...


6

The best way to write for an instrument you are unfamiliar is, is to work together with whoever is going to be playing the part. Start by writing the piece as you imagine it, in a way that you think will work. Then show this to your guitarist and get them to play it for you. You'll get plenty of feedback on what works and what doesn't, and things you can ...


6

If you are following the standard mode-chord mapping you should use Dorian over the ii Mixolydian over the V7 Ionian over I as your question alludes to. However this is not a useful approach to true improve. If you want to play "out" I find the blues (more specifically the minor blues) can be forced onto almost anything. You have the b5, b3, and b7. ...


6

Since the solid bass playing will stop during a bass solo, only coming back in during the last couple of bars, maybe, the drums often continue. That is to keep a rhythm going, sometimes even against what the bass is doing to solo. On occasions such as that, I may put stabs in, usually on beat 1 of every four or eight bars, or where there's a fundamental ...


6

The amount of pick sliding over the string may be the problem. Try holding the pick more gently, and changing the length it sticks out, thus not more than 3 or 4 mm showing. Also, you may be digging into the string too much. There are times when we hold the pick differently, and attack the strings differently, for certain different sounds. You've found one.


6

It means 'continue right hand solo'. The RH solo starts at M.54 (notated) and at M.58 you continue improvising in a similar style. The arranger has written out the first four bars of the solo to give you an idea of the intended style and to give you some ideas to build on. There is normally no requirement to play those notes, you can play your own.


6

Pentatonics are so much safer! The two notes that are most likely to sound out of place in any chord sequence are the two omitted from the diatonic set - 4 and 7. A tritone apart (both ways). Those two notes are far more likely to clash with any chord likely to appear in common chord sequences. Without them, tunes using pentatonic notes do sound a little ...


5

Technically what's happening is the G# over an A chord gives Amaj7, over the C#m is just a 5, within the chord, and over the D makes a b5, as in blues. So yes it'll do the job. As Matthew says, if it sounds good, it usually is.Ears are so good at this skill. I wouldn't just hold that note while the 3 chords are being played consecutively, although it will ...


5

Most of the time, if it sounds good to you it's okay. If it sounds good to the band, that's even better. If it sounds good to the audience, that's the best. But you don't know until they hear it!


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