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6

If you are following the standard mode-chord mapping you should use Dorian over the ii Mixolydian over the V7 Ionian over I as your question alludes to. However this is not a useful approach to true improve. If you want to play "out" I find the blues (more specifically the minor blues) can be forced onto almost anything. You have the b5, b3, and b7. ...


6

The best way to write for an instrument you are unfamiliar is, is to work together with whoever is going to be playing the part. Start by writing the piece as you imagine it, in a way that you think will work. Then show this to your guitarist and get them to play it for you. You'll get plenty of feedback on what works and what doesn't, and things you can ...


6

Since the solid bass playing will stop during a bass solo, only coming back in during the last couple of bars, maybe, the drums often continue. That is to keep a rhythm going, sometimes even against what the bass is doing to solo. On occasions such as that, I may put stabs in, usually on beat 1 of every four or eight bars, or where there's a fundamental ...


5

There are different ways to see it. Your E minor pentatonic fits there, because the notes of the E minor pentatonic added to an A major chord either support the A major, or add to it creating more complex chords. Additionally the G note does something that's not found in plain A major scale, making it a dominant chord (A7). When vamped over instead of ...


5

If I understood you correctly, you're trying to play notes from a scale that's always rooted on the root note of whatever chord there is at that moment. And that's why for example if your chords are C - Dm - G - Am, a minor pentatonic scale seems to work nicely on the Am and Dm, but feels a bit funky on the C major and G major chords. If this is what you're ...


4

There just isn't a simple graph that could be made - time played against ability to play. Every single person's would be very different! And then there's actual playing ability. Playing any of those songs, do you nail it every time? Could you sit in with other musos and play a song perfectly every time? Would it take you an hour or a month to learn, say, ...


4

It is clear that this progression is modulating to Fm, the IV of Cm. Although the G7 is the V7 of Cm, indicating C harmonic or melodic minor I think it is clear that you will hear the change to C maj leading from G7. Now, the C is the V of Fm, and you could pass through C7 on your way there. The point is that one option is to play F harmonic minor ...


3

Dorian-Myxolydian-Ionian If I understood correctly, you'd play dorian on the ii, mixolydian on the V and ionian on the I? No wonder you want variety, because that's practically like playing the same scale all the time, because you don't have even a single out-of-scale note anywhere. :) In modal playing, things stay in the same harmonic posture for a long ...


3

I'm not sure if there IS a definitive answer to this question, but here are some thoughts. In the Baroque court, composers were under such time-constraints there would have been little time for soloists to memorize the music. While the orchestra was drawn from the court entourage, who were already on the payroll, professional musicians were hired to play ...


3

Musicians starting memorizing music during the Romantic Era. This practice was introduced by virtuosos such and Liszt and Paganini who may have wanted to show off.


3

Chords are meant to support melody rather than dictate melody. This is something that many musicians get backwards when they first start improv. Joe Pass, for example, would play beautiful melodic lines that defined chords progressions. It takes time to learn but there isn't a lot of variety in western music. For some musicians a drone chord or vamp is ...


3

Improvisation is live composing, and composing is slow improvisation. If you haven't been given instructions on what to do, you have to make it up yourself. Whatever you don't have, you make up. If you don't have a rhythm, you imagine a rhythm. If you don't have chords, you imagine chords. But you think you do have chords? ... over just a chord repeating ...


3

You absolutely CAN improvise in Am over the Am chord and then, when the F chord comes, improvise in F. There's no musical rule that all chords in a song, or even a section of a song, must fit into the same scale. But, in this case, you might find it useful to think of the song being in F major.


3

A few pointers: Using a chord tone as the first note on the next chord will almost always sound good. Who says that you have to play a previous different note to resolve on that? You may do that, of course, but it's by no means mandatory. Doing what you describe sounds like a good exercise for learning "target notes" on chord changes, but it's by no means ...


2

If I understand the question properly, you're asking which notes/scales can be used for improv. over this sequence. It's in Am to start, not A, so some notes from A will sound out of tune. All the chords come from key Fmajor, apart from any other. So, for simplicity, those notes will by and large fit all. Some would explain that modes are the way to go - ...


2

Perhaps you like the sound of the 9th. Why wouldn't you? The scale has the root, the fifth and the seventh, and then you add the ninth. Leaving out the third probably has a big effect---it doesn't tie you down to a particular sound (major or minor). It's more rock than blues.


2

The answers so far provide a lot of good info. Have you tried any other mixtures of modes or degrees? Like D min penta on A, or E Phrygian, E Major? The reason I ask is that there are "compatible keys" in western music theory and no surprise they fall on the circle of 5ths (or 4ths depending on which direction you go). You can see this from the ...


2

In most cases what you need to seek out are open strings: they ring out nicely, and they can free up a fretting finger. For bass notes, you can't beat E and A. An open D won't sound as rich, but it's OK. So, E, A and D make good go-to keys for a guitar arrangement. Often in an arrangement you may be fretting a chord a fair way up the neck but still ...


2

I’m primarily a bass player but started out on guitar and know enough about the instrument to offer what I think is a useful answer. The link shows a guitar arrangement in G but you say you got a lead sheet in Eb and want to do an original arrangement so I’m basing my answer on that. If the song doesn’t need to be played or sung in Eb, Billy Joel’s original ...


2

(TL;DR: harmony and phrasing) Harmony You ask "How to achieve harmony?" There's nothing to achieve, some kind of harmonic feeling or "context" always exists. The question is, what to you do to the harmony with your solo, so I transform your question to: "How to achieve an understanding of what I'm doing to the harmony." Any note can be played over any ...


2

A great exercise is to examine closely many good tunes, and their harmonies. Check what notes are played on beat one of each bar. Check the pattern of the rhythm of notes making up the tune. Check what 'foreign' notes are used - and where they come in a bar. Check how several notes might get played one way on one chord, and in a similar way on a ...


2

It's terrific. I'm not familiar with his music. I can't hear the other musicians establishing a second pulse at any point. When Mehldau dislocates himself from their pulse I can sometimes see how it's done, but not always. At 1'44", near the start of his solo, he gives the impression of a different pulse. (The lower clef is what the bass plays.) The ...


2

The piano solo quavers are all with off-beat. You can improve the rhythmic notation by pulling forward all 8th notes by the position of a 16th. Or you notate it in half time (fourth notes, then the upbeat will be eighth notes). Thus you will get the whole part with pairs of tied quavers.


2

To double your options, it's also common to approach the root of the next chord from a semitone above, especially in jazz, but it works in all sorts of music. Unexpected, maybe, but it gets the job done, and could well fit into the rest of that previous bar. Give it a try!


1

Well I have personally worked on developing the guitar soloing courses included in the Musician Training Center software, so this suggestion is biased by that, but I'd say that you may find courses such as the Guitar Speed Trainer or the Guitar Scales Method pretty useful: http://www.micrologus.com/courses


1

I think you did a pretty good job transcribing this, although there is a rhythmic issue on the notation. I played it a couple of times and the notes seem to be correct. Some comments: The last bar and a half is one octave lower than the rest, you could switch to a treble key or move everything below the bar. As you correctly transcribed, the whole thing is ...


1

There are multiple reasons you might choose a particular key for guitar. Here are a few: As in the guitar chart you linked, G major is friendly because it has easily played open chord voicings. C major could be another good choice, as it utilizes all the open strings of a standard tuning. If you are intent on singing along, you might chose a key that is ...


1

I wouldn't call that a key change, unless the C major chord is held for half a minute or something. :) It's simply a temporary scale or mode change, "borrowing" a V-I (or V-i) motion from F minor. In the key of F minor, the dominant-tonic chord combination is C7 - Fm. You can expand on that idea by playing a Bbm or Bbm6 chord on top of the C major - that's ...


1

It's the same idea as a lot of beginner players use for a 12 bar 'blues'. If they know the pentatonic minor scale notes in, say, A, then they'll play those over all three chords in a 12 bar in A. That includes over the other two chords - D and E. So particularly over the D chord, it's exactly what you do. But it works (by and large) over all three. There ...


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