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It is very common to use the 1 and 3 over a minor third (3 fret stretch) up there. In fact it is common to use the third finger on that pattern even below the 10th fret, say at 7 or 5. It all depends on the physiology of your hand and if you can do this comfortably. As for being faster, that is a matter of practice. In time there is no reason why you ...


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Some players' fingers are too fat, too short, too long to do what others are happy with. Part of learning a new piece is to decide which fingering is best for you, and it seems like you are well aware of that factor. Try all options, and if the fret space is big enough to accommodate whichever finger, and the stretch isn't making your hand work harder than ...


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A pentatonic scale is just a normal 7-note one with the two 'wrong' ones taken out. What we used to call the 'avoid notes'. But restricting yourself to those 5 notes just means you'll play something that doesn't sound wrong, not something interesting. Look at all the available notes (and that's ALL of them!) and think what their place would be over a C ...


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TL;DR: Find the home note and home chord. Do not play random notes from a single scale First of all, two bad ideas you should try to get rid of: Bad idea #1: Select notes from a scale randomly. Bad idea #2: Use one single scale for the whole song regardless of what's happening in the backing chords. The scale you should think about often changes with the ...


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It's probably more useful to know why to use which, rather than which to use. As a basic, with Am and C in the sequence, Am pent. and C maj. pent would be a good choice. As it happens, they're exactly the same notes! The pents work well, as they leave out the two notes which can be awkward to fit in: the 4 and 7 of maj. pent., or the 2 and 6 of min. pent. ...


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