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2

The answer by "guest" is perhaps a bit extreme, but it does have a bit of a point. Music needs to be composed such that it flows together in time, and I think the view of "thematic" sections vs. "transition" sections tends to create a false sense of prioritization, as if the "theme" sections are primary and the "transitions" just "fill in" between them or ...


1

It all starts with connecting the dots. One simple way that you could adopt is by looking at both part A and part B that you are trying to connect; then use any of the common turnarounds - ii-V-I or I-IV-V - to move from the last chord of part A leading to the beginning of part B. You could also use passing tones, chromatic notes to connect the two parts. ...


-1

You are thinking about this wrong. Music doesn't have "themes", "transitions", etc. It starts at the beginning, and continues till it stops at the end. You are not alone in making this mistake, though. There are hundreds of textbooks which claim that music is written in different "forms," made from "themes" and other theoretical notions. And there are ...


1

Most of B themes carry within some information about A; if not, even with smooth transition and/or many structural directions taken, they will sound unrelated. You should "glue" musical stuff the same way you compose them: with meaning. There must be a "why", at least only in your heart.


0

I see no problems with keeping a waltz in sonata-allegro form coherent. I've composed tougher and more aberrant sonata-allegros. A ragtime sonata-allegro, compete with properly repeated strains of conventional length...a heavy metal sonata-allegro...a 20th century-style toccata in sonata-allegro form, complete with the increased dissonance typical of 20th-...


1

A look at primary sources would make sense in this instance. At the outset, anyhow, and as Gregory Proctor discusses in his important Ph.D. dissertation ("Technical Bases of Nineteenth-Century Tonality: A Study in Chromaticism," Princeton Univ., 1978), enharmonic tones such as B-flat and A-sharp do not have the same signification in the music of common-...


5

It seems to me that the purpose of the notation is to show the performer how to interpret what is happening. After the ambiguous passage, we do arrive at the start of what appears to be a new section, in a new key, with a new rhythm (cut time not 3/4), at a new tempo (Presto) - though it's not quite clear what the new key actually is, since we only hear one ...


8

The key signature change aligns with the Presto, to emphasize that the harmony at that point is still B D F#, because the bare B's aren't enough to show that. His other late sonatas also modulate briefly and surprisingly, but with more than just unisons, so they needn't compensate with such brief key signature changes. Changing key signatures in the third ...


3

Well, we don't know Beethoven's considerations. I am wondering why Beethoven actually did make a key signature change which only lasts four bars. For such a short while you would often use accidentals instead. But since there is a key signature change I would say it makes sense that the change happens at the same time as the time signature change and the ...


1

Far from an experienced composer/arranger, nor am I a string musician, but based on what I've heard in classical repertoire, having the second violin play as low as G below middle C isn't necessarily a bad thing, although it does add some special flavor to the music, in my opinion more espressivo and passionate, in fact, a lot of composers have used it in ...


0

@Caters First of all I would say that there is nothing which prevents a composer from using sonata form ideas in any composition whether it is a waltz or whatever it is. Afterall the sonata form in essence is a big ABA form, so any type of music that is essentially thought of as an ABA form could be evolved into a sonata form with two themes in the A part, ...


0

It isn't a sonata. It fits easily into ternary form. The "A" section is the two themes in Eb and Ab. The middle "B" section is the part in Db. The demarcation of those sections is pretty obvious as they are indicated by the key signature changes for bars 69-188 for the "B" section. Merely repeating a theme is not a recapitulation. The basic idea of a ...


2

The waltz is not in sonata form as commonly understood, nor even as it was extended greatly by romantic period composers. One of the few consistent features of sonata form is the return of the second theme in the tonic key in the recapitulation. (In the 20th century, this even became known as the "sonata principle" because it's the most characteristic ...


2

A musical form is not a jelly-mould into which a composer pours some notes, and out comes a composition. If a piece by Chopin doesn't "fit" the jelly-mould described in a textbook, the most likely option is that the textbook is "wrong," not the Chopin was "wrong". This basic misconception seems to occur in many of the OP's posts, but arguing the specific ...


0

" How is Chopin able to mesh together Sonata Form and the waltz so well?" The answer is probably simply "because he's a genius" A waltz was originally a piece for dancing and dancers have certain expectations of form. Chopin's waltzes are purely concert pieces and never intended for dancing, so he would not have felt constricted by the standard form. He ...


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