32

I'm going to go with "it was always common". Certainly many Renaissance madrigals are written to "you" (or "thee", as the case may be): Come again! Sweet love doth now invite Thy graces that refrain To do me due delight. To see, to hear, To touch, to kiss, To die with thee again in sweetest sympathy. Come Again, John Dowland, c.1597 ...


25

As the other answers have correctly pointed out, you can do what sounds good to you. But this might leave you with a feeling of not knowing where to start. That's why I would like to let you know the little trick used in Lithium and zillions of other songs: you can mix the chords from the major scale and its parallel minor. In the case of Lithium you have ...


25

Minor nitpick: in your first example, the semiquaver should precede the minim. That will improve readability: Major nitpick: The two rhythms are identical. A crotchet triplet can be subdivided into 12 semiquavers. We're dividing two beats into 12 equally-sized divisions. The first example splits them into a group of 3 and a group of 9; that is, 1/4 (3/12) ...


21

You should do both! When I just start working with other musicians, I like to get a cover or two under our belts so we can feel each other out and learn to play as a group. Literally at the same time, I like to meet for songwriting sessions to start putting stuff together for originals. Both covers and originals will improve your skills, but perhaps in ...


20

Theory is not a set of rules to be followed or broken. Theory is a set of explanations for why things sound the way they do. As a composer you use theory to help inform your choices, but it never dictates anything.


19

Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? No, it is not a device commonly used in popular music. However, this technique is extremely common in other forms of music. There are no good reasons to avoid this technique, band musicians are still ...


17

Listen, listen, listen to lots of new kinds of music. Regularly. Not just your style or your favorites. Don't just listen. Marinate. Challenge yourself. It'll be tough initially, and it may not hold your attention, but the exercise does pay off. You'll start to hear things "out of the box" that you didn't before and you'll have fresher perspectives on your ...


17

TLDR; Listen to new music, play in new keys, try to emulate other styles/genres, choose new chord progressions and approach your writing from a different perspective, ie, which instrument you write on, both for accompaniment and melody. What you are experiencing is entirely normal. As humans we have managed to survive and evolve due to our recognition of ...


16

I think this is a pretty common problem. There are lots of guitarist that have plenty of technical chops as well as theory knowledge, but are unable to create actually musical solos. A big part of the problem is thinking too small-scale: noodling around in a loop may indeed end up with a short snippet that sounds pretty cool, but often no way to go any ...


14

It does depend on the style of music, but generally speaking I think there are good rules of thumb which will yield good results in most styles. Keep it easy to sing and easy to remember. You want predominantly stepwise motion. Any leaps should be smallish, or else easy to sing intervals like 5ths and octaves. Bigger leaps and/or those more difficult to ...


13

Nope! It's not necessarily a mismatch. The major or minor quality of the key a song is in is only one of many, many qualities that determine its emotion. It gets to the point that a major song can be very sad, and a minor song can be very happy, depending on the context. For concrete examples, "Last Train Home" by the Pat Metheny group (listen on Spotify) ...


13

TL;DR: No. You can use anything you like, as long as it sounds good to you. You can use many scales or not use any; you can use chords from some scale or use chords outside that scale. Just experiment with the theory knowledge you have and you'll see that the rules are made to be broken. You can use them when you want (or need) to, but when you are ...


13

It gets more complicated. The term 'refrain' comes from a time when poems were routinely set to music, and it is more appropriately left for the discussion of Classical and Romantic songs. At the turn of the nineteenth century, a popular or 'parlour' song was likely to have a verse and a chorus (or according to some old sheet music, the refrain). The verse ...


12

I agree 100% with everything Todd Wilcox stated in his excellent answer! To add to what he said - as a songwriter myself, I find that learning covers is a great way to improve not only my skills as a musician, but also my skills as a songwriter. First of all, when I write my own songs and musical arrangements, I tend to use chords and riffs that I am ...


12

You could also ask “why do artists outside of the country genre use complex chords instead of the simpler harmonies of country music?” The complex harmonies are not necessarily better. In the country genre, there is a culture where an artist will make a song, and millions of everyday people who may not have had access to musical schooling can get themselves ...


12

You really have two questions there. I'm going to answer this one: In a section like the chorus, how do you get the layering of many instrument to get that full and rich impression? Playing a bunch of instruments at the same time can easily lead to a big mess, even when the instruments are playing compatible notes. Playing the exact same thing on the ...


12

Reading music - safe. Regurgitating others' riffs - safe. Both, when one is good at either (or both) have a certain authenticity to them. 'I play what's written - if it's written, it's probaably good, so that makes my playing sound good'. 'I play just like Clapton did on that track. If it sounded good when he played it, and I play it well, it makes my ...


11

The verse-chorus (sometimes with a bridge) form replaced the AABA 32-bar formula in popular music at around the sixties. And the 32-bar form replaced the strophic form (verses sometimes with a refrain) which most earlier folk songs were based on. So it represents the current taste and is by no means timeless or universal, just a current tendency. But ...


11

Whilst on a major scale ,borrowing chords from the minor scale with the same name is common (and vice versa). Really common to be honest. Some of the most common borrowed chords are the V (dominant), IVm and bVI. Now for your progression. Since you said you were on C major, we have: Cm (borrowed) G (V) Dm (II) Am (VI) Or if we are on A natural minor, we ...


11

First, you play a toy xylophone, and it has 1 octave of the notes in a major scale. And you can play a lot of nursery rhymes. Then you pick up a recorder, and there are some more notes in between the ones you used to play, and now you can do more - sometimes it sounds dissonant when you pick a random note or miss the one you meant to play, but you are now ...


11

I would recommend recording yourself. Recording devices are so cheap and common now, that it would be the easy solution. As far a recalling a song or tune, there probably is not that much difference between remembering what you wrote yourself or someone else wrote.


11

I am not a music teacher, have not been teached by a music teacher and would not consider myself a 'good' guitarist. But I remember having similar problems in terms of improvisation. When I tried to improvise, I felt like I don't know where to go or what to do. The thing which helped me a lot was to focus on call and response. A friend of mine showed me a ...


11

You are not doing anything wrong, being creative, improvising and composing ideas can be very difficult. It one of the things that takes musicians the longest amount of time to get good at. When I come across someone who is struggling with creativity I like to pass on a 3 word phrase that is associated with the late great Clark Terry, one of the finest and I ...


10

Do you need lyrics? If it is hard to write them, it's easiest to skip them and compose instrumental music. If this is not an option, do you have a friend that can write them? Not all musicians write lyrics. In a band it is common that many members contribute to the music, but only the singer writes lyrics. I you want to "learn" how to write lyrics, then ...


10

No. It doesn't have to. If you want, it can; but if you don't want, it doesn't need to. I think the best thing you can say is that the good ones add up to a significant whole - something greater than the sum of the parts. Imagine a reggae version of Happy Birthday - you know the tune so well that no matter what is done to the arrangement rhythmically, it's ...


10

Your playing needs to be in the same key you're thinking about i.e. singing in, and there are basically two different approaches to do the coordination. A: playing adjusts to singing: find the key you're singing in B: singing adjusts to playing: give yourself a harmonic reference before starting to sing, in order to try and force the singing to be in a key ...


10

Any vocal work can only be fully appreciated by listening to it in the original language, whether that language is German (Schubert's "Winterreise", or any Wagner or Strauss opera) or Italian (Puccini, Verdi etc.), because a translation nearly always loses some of the detail of the original. In extreme cases the whole meaning can be lost, ...


10

In the common 12-edo tuning, the octave is divided in 12 equally-spaced steps (hence equal divisions of the octave). What's meant my “equal” is that the frequency ratio between subsequent notes is always the same, or equivalently the logarithm of the frequencies of neighbouring notes always have the same difference. The other way around, it means that the ...


10

Do note that your question is really vague (and too close to the "opinion based" flag). As many rules, the first rule is that there is no absolute rule. Bass lines are fundamental (yes, implied joke): they give a reference to the listener, and that reference is usually a foundation to what the listener perceives. There's a reason for which they ...


9

It's somewhat like writing a story, or a book. One of the first things to consider is - what is the audience, who am I writing this for? A lot of the best known/loved songs are quite simple. That's because they appeal to a bigger cross-section of the listening public, who can understand and appreciate them. Songs with lots of cool chords, etc., appeal to me, ...


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