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"If you go through each note of a key, and create a triad with a root from each note. Are all the triads composed of notes exclusive to that original key?" Yes, there is a set of chords - you'll see them listed in every theory book, probably near the 'circle of 5ths' diagram - that can be made using just the diatonic notes - the 'notes in the scale'. ...


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If you go through each note of a key, and create a triad with a root from each note. Are all the triads composed of notes exclusive to that original key? Yes. Your question implies that the scale is built like F major, resp. C-major (wwhwwwh). In this case it doesn’t matter how many sharp or flats this key contains. The structure is always the same: the ...


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Yes it does. In any key you have a "natural" set of chords. You are pointing out the triads but in fact you have an entire 7 note 13th chord, just the mode of that degree played in thirds. Your formula can be extended to read. I - I-Major Triad: 1 - 3 - 5 ii - ii-minor Triad: 2 - 4 - 6 iii - iii-minor Triad: 3 - 5 - 7 IV - IV-Major Triad: 4 - 6 - 8 V ...


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For major keys, yes. All the chords belonging to the key consist of "notes in the key" or "notes of the key". These notes are often called the notes that are diatonic to the key, and the chords are often called the diatonic chords of the key. (The major scale is the diatonic scale starting from a certain point, so by sticking to the notes of the major scale,...


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They can be, they don't have to be especially as you dive deeper in harmony. In an intro to harmony, you'll build chords based off the notes in a major key, but then when you get into a minor key the harmony becomes more diverse. In a slightly more advanced harmony class you will get into the concepts of secondary dominants, augmented 6th chords, and ...


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Yes. The point of diatonic triads is that their notes are all contained within the key - diatonic. There will be of course, other non-diatonic notes (chromatics) that will occur in many pieces, to add colour to the harmonies, but by definition, they will not belong to the key. You ask about any key. That's a little too open. Do you mean any major key? If ...


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Harmonic variation was used by composers in classic and romantic period (symphonies, sonatas) and it is usual in folks somgs and probably in jazz too. I don’t remember a pop song at the moment but there are surely a few. What I often use is within a song: varying the chord leading to the sub dominant (I7 or I#5 ... ) Like other answers say, this practice ...


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"Is this concept of taking a certain melody and playing it over different chord progressions in different sections of the song "poor form" for any reason?" I would urge you to reverse the thinking and realize that melodies don't get played over chords. Chords are supposed to support the melody. That being said it is quite common for soloists to structure ...


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"Mack The Knife" has a couple of passages where the chords change but the melody lingers on. Your chord patterns are close except for the last chord. The first two chords are harmonically the same (the seventh changes the color but not the function, it's still a progression up a fifth (or down a fourth or however one wants to think of it.) The Am is a C ...


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One example is the "Domine Jesu Christe" from the Requiem, Op. 5, by Hector Berlioz. Throughout the piece the chorus sings the same phrase which just up a minor second and back down.


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