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The best way it to start learning to play an instrument. If you still what to focus more on the lyrics and signing then you can use Arcade by Output. They have 30 days free trial and after that is $10 / month. Their platform has a bunch of loops, instruments that you can use with a mouse click. Arcade by Output website


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This depends on the style of music you are writing, and the corresponding performance practices. I'm more familiar with instrumental music than vocal, but the same basic idea applies to both. If you write a phrase that is followed by a rest, performers will tend to make the last note shorter than its written duration, whether or not the there is a slur ...


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As you ask for singers and choirs it might depend of the ending consonant. Many amateur singers don't keep the whole note and give not the exact value. Normally it is up to the conductor to tell the members how long he wants the note exactly held. If you are conductor yourself I you can say the ending consonant has to be sung on the first eighth note. I ...


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You've given yourself a problem in bar 2. I understand your urge to imitate the melodic shape of bar 1, but it's given you a strong D in the treble, a strong C♯ in the bass, and they fight! Here are some chords you COULD strum along to the rest of it. But I strongly suggest you don't. You haven't written a melody that requires accompaniment, you'...


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You've already established that it's in B♭ - or one of its modes. By using the key sig. The modes are - B♭ Ionian. C Dorian. D Phrygian. E♭ Lydian. F Mixolydian. G Aeolian. A Locrian. You say D Phrygian was intended, but it slipped into Gm. Gm is the Aeolian of B♭. It's very easy to slip into the parent key, or its relative minor. The ...


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I have found that some pitch recognition software has trouble identifying sung notes - especially if you have a "rich/complex" voice. I think maybe because the 2nd harmonic (or higher ones) can be in fact louder than the "actual" note sung and it gets confused? Not sure. But I have seen it happen. A progam I like to see what note you are singing is ...


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It may be that you're singing 'in the cracks'. It may be that you have an idea of the shape of your melody but are singing each phrase in a different key due to vocal limitations. Or it may be something else. But without actually hearing you we're just guessing. Maybe, if you posted a recording of you singing we could help more. But ideally arrange a ...


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For definite you're not singing a tune that would be considered chord like as to my knowledge, we don't sing in multiple pitches simultaneously. I think i have seen people sing maybe in two pitches simultaneously but it is a very fine skill and not an accidental one, plus it still wouldn't be a chord but an interval. Even singing out of tune, doesn't ...


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I agree with Albrecht's answer that you should record yourself then transcribe what you are singing. But I will also add this. The human voice can sing a continuum of tones and most modern instruments, especially the piano, cannot! You may be singing notes that simply do not exist in 12TET tuning. This is not a bad thing as plenty of cultures, e.g. India,...


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Your playing needs to be in the same key you're thinking about i.e. singing in, and there are basically two different approaches to do the coordination. A: playing adjusts to singing: find the key you're singing in B: singing adjusts to playing: give yourself a harmonic reference before starting to sing, in order to try and force the singing to be in a key ...


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You could „record“ your song with help of a notation program (singing and converting wave to midi, and try to let it harmonize by the software and show the sheet music. But you will be more successful learning the fundamentals of harmony and chord progression and improve your music knowledge, ear training, solfège, chords etc.


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