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22

No. A trivial counterexample for periodic sounds would be a sine wave, which has only one tone and therefore cannot contain a major chord. Now, many (most?) naturally created periodic sounds will have the harmonics that form a major chord, but it's not a requirement. As far as unpitched sounds, proper noise may technically have some energy at the ...


9

"any complex sound wave without a clear pitch and with many partials that are not whole number integers" The major chord is the frequency ratio 4:5:6, so if the partials are inharmonic and don't include the 4th, 5th, and 6th harmonics, or their octave equivalents, then you wouldn't find the major chord in the partials. Stringed instruments and wind ...


7

I think the thing you are talking about, the overtone series where the first bunch of overtones outline a major chord, is about a vibrating string. It's not about "all natural sounds." At least that is the historic origin as I understand from my reading. Chord of Nature and Klang are topic to look up regarding the music theory history. ...This ...


7

Do all periodic or “natural” sounds contain major chords? Just to be a bit nitpicky, 'periodic' and 'natural' aren't necessarily the same thing. In fact I will go as far as to say that no 'natural' sounds, by what I think would be a reasonable person's definition of 'natural', are entirely periodic - you can usually only create something close to genuinely ...


7

It is my understanding from so far limited research that all whole number integer ratios sound simultaneously with the fundamental It depends on exactly what situation/instrument you're talking about. With many acoustic instruments, you often see an initial 'chaotic' part of the sound that quickly turns into a pitched sound as the energy driving the sound ...


6

Sound consists of individual sine waves, meaning that any waveform that occurs in the physical world can be decomposed into a number of single-frequency waves. A sound can consist of only a single frequency. For example, a sine wave produced by a synthesizer's sine oscillator is like that. In that case there are no overtones, there are no partials. Only a ...


5

The question is a little bit ill-posed, as the term natural is not well defined. I'll try to clarify from my point of view which is that of a physicist and musician. Define "Major chord" as the sound of 3 sine waves in the frequency relations 4:5:6 In physics, the simplest equation to describe wave propagation is the d'Alembert equation. In one ...


4

Agreeing with John. He uses a fixed mic to sing into, so can only sway when not singing. He also mostly uses iems (in ear monitors), so wherever his head is, he'll be hearing the mix he asked for, and not catching anything else around - probably not the audience at all. He's most likely doing what the music is making him do - a lot of us move to music (it's ...


4

I’m going to basically give a blanket “no” to this question. Without knowing Stevie or having heard him discuss this here are my reasons: Stevie doesn’t always sway, he does it mostly when he is not singing and he does it to the groove. There isn’t any aural advantage to swaying since sound is air moving and by swaying we are interfering with the way it hits ...


3

I don't think it's always presented that way. The Wikipedia page has three different graphical representations. Of those representations the one in staff notation presents it like a series I think to simply allow space for labeling. I know that I don't read it and think it's literally presenting pitches in time, like it was a melody.


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