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30

Gain is the input level control, it decides how hard the input signal hits the preamp. Guitar amps often exploit the effect of hitting it HARD, overdriving it into distortion. Volume controls how much the output from the preamp is amplified. Again, specifically on a guitar amp, there may be the possibility of driving the speakers into interesting overload ...


22

No. A trivial counterexample for periodic sounds would be a sine wave, which has only one tone and therefore cannot contain a major chord. Now, many (most?) naturally created periodic sounds will have the harmonics that form a major chord, but it's not a requirement. As far as unpitched sounds, proper noise may technically have some energy at the ...


12

In the old days, someone woud have two halves of a coconut shell, and tap them on a hard surface. As pointed out by Tetsujin, this was back in the day - 1957, so I suspect here, it's produced in that way. No synths to turn to then, and horses weren't allowed in recording studios, usually. Nowadays it would be made electronically, and the sound either ...


9

Destructive interference would effect what you hear, but that doesn't change the composition. You could do other things to make a performance or playback inaudible, like move very far away or put a jackhammer next to the listener. Interfere however you like, that won't change the composition, because the composition is purely conceptual.


9

Yes it is normal. The gain is the volume control of the input of the amplifier. The signal flow of the tube amplifier goes: Gain (preamp input) to tone stack (eq) to phase inverter stage (input to power amp) to power tubes (amplifier). Amplifiers that simulate a tube amp follow a similar signal flow.


9

"any complex sound wave without a clear pitch and with many partials that are not whole number integers" The major chord is the frequency ratio 4:5:6, so if the partials are inharmonic and don't include the 4th, 5th, and 6th harmonics, or their octave equivalents, then you wouldn't find the major chord in the partials. Stringed instruments and wind ...


8

You can do this. All you need to do is invert the signal, i.e. generate a waveform that is the exact negative of the input waveform and add it to the input so there is no signal left. This is how noise-cancelling headphones work. Then you add in your own signal. Why anybody would go to the trouble of doing this, is a completely different question.


7

Do all periodic or “natural” sounds contain major chords? Just to be a bit nitpicky, 'periodic' and 'natural' aren't necessarily the same thing. In fact I will go as far as to say that no 'natural' sounds, by what I think would be a reasonable person's definition of 'natural', are entirely periodic - you can usually only create something close to genuinely ...


7

I think the thing you are talking about, the overtone series where the first bunch of overtones outline a major chord, is about a vibrating string. It's not about "all natural sounds." At least that is the historic origin as I understand from my reading. Chord of Nature and Klang are topic to look up regarding the music theory history. ...This ...


7

It is my understanding from so far limited research that all whole number integer ratios sound simultaneously with the fundamental It depends on exactly what situation/instrument you're talking about. With many acoustic instruments, you often see an initial 'chaotic' part of the sound that quickly turns into a pitched sound as the energy driving the sound ...


6

If the note is played percussively (e.g. with a pick, as opposed to e.g. a violin bow), at somewhere around 30 nps the attack of the note itself will be heard as a low note. Why? Simply because around 30 Hz (give or take, depending on person, age, ear conditions, etc.) is the lowest frequency audible by humans. In other words, when the percussive attack of ...


6

There is no attempt in this video to made an authentic clip-clop sound as is done with coconut shells. This sounds to me like a wooden percussion block. You can hear the various sounds they can make here. Schlagwerk Woodblocks Percussion Blocks


6

I don't know why I wrote all this but here goes: Note duration in MIDI The way most synthesizers and samplers (and other similar instruments) work is constrained by the conceptual model behind the MIDI standard from 1982. In that model, there is (1) a controller keyboard (physical or virtual) and (2) a "synth", i.e. a sound-producing component (...


6

Sound consists of individual sine waves, meaning that any waveform that occurs in the physical world can be decomposed into a number of single-frequency waves. A sound can consist of only a single frequency. For example, a sine wave produced by a synthesizer's sine oscillator is like that. In that case there are no overtones, there are no partials. Only a ...


5

Yes - it's woodblocks. Temple blocks are often used - especially in pantomime - but not here. There IS an attempt to make them sound authentic: the player has two sticks in each hand and they strike the woodblocks with a slight flam. In other words there ARE four hooves! (Ker-lip Ker-lop) It would work better if the pitches of the two blocks were less ...


5

Effectively, there are three controls to your equipment. Volume on the guitar, volume on the pre-amp stage of your amp., and volume on the post, or amplifying stage of your amp. With any one of those turned all the way down, the signal will not get through its entire path. Guitar volume down - there's no signal from the guitar. Gain down - the guitar signal ...


5

The question is a little bit ill-posed, as the term natural is not well defined. I'll try to clarify from my point of view which is that of a physicist and musician. Define "Major chord" as the sound of 3 sine waves in the frequency relations 4:5:6 In physics, the simplest equation to describe wave propagation is the d'Alembert equation. In one ...


4

Yes, at least some gain is needed. When it's turned off, no signal is being sent from your guitar to the amp. Gain defines the signal input level to your amp. Thus, if set to 0, there will be no sound produced. Volume defines the output level of sound. For example: Both gain and levels refer to the loudness of the audio. However, gain is the input level of ...


4

You seem to be asking more than one question, or convoluting several ideas together to create this scenario in your mind. Almost everyone has offered an answer that addresses "cancellation", which would turn off the sound. But you have stated... "I think you could, given a sound source, to change a second sound source so that the sum of the ...


4

The answer to your immediate question is no, wrapping Rockwool in plastic doesn't adversely affect sound absorption at all.(1) But I'd like to also answer a more general question you didn't ask, i.e. how to do a good job in your studio, and my suggestion would be that before you start your work you should read as much as possible, and watch as many videos as ...


4

As John Belzaguy said, this is much about science, I'll try my best to put that in a musical point of view. In theory, what you are are saying is yes: two waves can cancel each in the process called destructive interferences. This is the process used for tuning a guitar using harmonics. However, there are a few problems… Coherency of the waves In order to ...


4

Setup 1: oscillator with the carrier frequency and a oscillator modulating the carrier frequency. Setup 2: two independent oscillators, one set to the carrier frequency and one with the modulation frequency. Do we hear the same sound and/or timber? In general, no. Frequency-modulating a carrier with a modulator doesn't give you a result that just contains ...


4

In a sense, this is usually the case. When the oboe plays 440Hz to tune the orchestra, you hear a continuous tone like your fidget spinner when it is fast. You do not hear 440 high pressure peaks a second. However, play lower and lower notes and when they get really low, you will hear separate pulses, like your spinner as it slows. I created a series of ...


4

When it comes to MIDI sequencing, a DAW (like cakewalk) sends MIDI messages to a MIDI synthesizer plugin. It's the job of that synthesizer plugin to decide how to respond to those MIDI messages. Often, a synthesizer playing percussion sounds will be set up so that it doesn't respond to MIDI note-off messages (at the end of the note), so that the MIDI message ...


4

While it's true that a violin can play loud, a flute is technically louder due to its nature. Not only: trying to play very loud on a violin while keeping a good sound is hard, and there are limits over which you just can't (those limits also depend on the quality of the instrument and the bow, not only the technique); on the contrary, having a good sound ...


4

I’m going to basically give a blanket “no” to this question. Without knowing Stevie or having heard him discuss this here are my reasons: Stevie doesn’t always sway, he does it mostly when he is not singing and he does it to the groove. There isn’t any aural advantage to swaying since sound is air moving and by swaying we are interfering with the way it hits ...


4

Agreeing with John. He uses a fixed mic to sing into, so can only sway when not singing. He also mostly uses iems (in ear monitors), so wherever his head is, he'll be hearing the mix he asked for, and not catching anything else around - probably not the audience at all. He's most likely doing what the music is making him do - a lot of us move to music (it's ...


3

One thing I find helpful for analyzing what things sound like is to remember that human hearing is not intended to be a tool for the perfect capture of sounds like a WAV file or a phonograph. It's a tool that primarily grew as a survival tool. Its purpose was to get as much information about the world as possible. Music came later. Human hearing ...


3

Yes, tones are intentionally blended. It happens a number of ways. One way is reverb. The ancient kind is a cave or a cathedral. Electronic reverb and delay do the same thing artificially. Some might say reverb is just an echo effect, some kind of vague "aura" in sound. But, I think you can make the case that some spaces were designed intentionally ...


3

I don't think it's always presented that way. The Wikipedia page has three different graphical representations. Of those representations the one in staff notation presents it like a series I think to simply allow space for labeling. I know that I don't read it and think it's literally presenting pitches in time, like it was a melody.


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