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21

This is called feedback. Put simply, the microphone hears some sound. It sends it to the amp. The amp sends it to the speaker. Some time has passed. The microphone hears the sound from the speaker (now louder), sends it to the amp, and round-and-round it goes, getting louder each time. After a few goes around the loop, you reach internal limits and ...


15

A head is simply the name for an amplifier without a speaker. Your friends won't have heads on top of amps, they'll have heads on top of speakers (with the head driving the speaker). The "basic guitar amp" you have at the moment, is probably an amplifier and speaker combined in one cabinet. These are commonly called combos. There are several reasons for ...


14

It is so the speaker is pointed more towards your head than your feet and so you can hear yourself better. If a small combo-amp is on the ground, the sound has to bounce quite a bit to actually get to your ears and if you are at a band practice or a gig it may mean bandmates can hear you better than you can hear yourself. If your speaker is pointed at your ...


14

The noises are caused by electronics picking up wireless signals from your mobile phone and translating the interference into sound. Well-shielded circuits won't have this problem, but it's common in consumer electronics and some musical equipment, notably guitar leads. There's no damage to your equipment, and if the sound is a problem just keep the phone ...


14

Well first, the amount of power inherent in the average festival rig or even an installed club system will dwarf what you can get out of any four speakers on the planet. That chest-thumping kick drum that's a mainstay of EDM is produced by moving a lot of air very quickly, creating a shockwave you can feel. That requires a lot of big cones, in turn requiring ...


14

I think (for what it's worth) that in the late 50s/early60s, amps were placed at the front of the stage. At least that's what we did! With open back cabs like the pictured one, it wasn't a problem, as the sound came out of the back.Also, it was slightly better for on-stage noise, as there wasn't too much of it. So, we could see and operate the controls.But ...


12

No, it will not damage the speaker. The high tones of a guitar are simply not capable of damaging your bass amp. Even if the amp isn't really suitable for these high tones (and in many cases, they can actually play them just fine), the amp will perfectly survive them. No harm there. The other way around is a much worse idea, because deep bass tones tend to ...


11

It is true that a tube amp should not be operated without a load, i.e. without speakers (or a dummy load) connected. Solid state amps don't have that problem. The reason is that (almost) all tube amps use an output transformer, which can produce high voltage peaks if its secondary (output) winding is not connected, because the energy from the primary (from ...


10

I haven't found any comments on this question online from someone who actually knows a lot about amplifier design. I also have not been able to find any horror stories such as "I did this once and destroyed my amp/speaker", which I would expect to find if it were actually an issue. I have found many mentions of professional bass players using guitar amps and ...


10

Hi fidelity reproduction of high frequencies is undesirable in electric guitar amplification. If you look at what actually comes out of a guitar amp, things get really messy around 5 - 6 kHz and then drop off rapidly after that. This is a good thing. If you ever use any kind of amp or pedal distortion designed for guitar and then run it directly into a ...


9

Another couple of reasons why someone would choose head/speaker over combo : a comparable combo usually weighs more than one or the other, so is harder to hump around (poor old roady).Heads go wrong more frequently than speakers, so carrying a spare head to a gig is better than taking two combos. In defence of the combo, one doesn't need to remember the ...


9

Stage monitors are designed to do something quite different from what normal stereo speakers are designed to do. That means if you get great stage monitors, they won't sound so great as stereo speakers and vice/versa. But you could use one for the other. Getting effective stage monitors is more important, to me, because you want to be able to hear yourself ...


8

I see that you noticed this happens usually with the bass amp, and I don't see an answer addressing bass in particular. I can think of some reasons: Mechanical Coupling Bass amps are isolated from the floor to avoid mechanical coupling. Depending on the venue (stage design, materials, acoustics, etc) floor vibration can cause an array of problems, like ...


8

Key factors (hometheatershack.com) are your woofers' combined surface area; their displacement, achievable low Hz factors and an amplifier capable of delivering the power needs of the speaker configuration. You simply cannot expect this, to do what this does, which makes it feel like this. Behind the bar at the club, you might find racks full of amps ...


8

The only measurements of speaker parameters made before and after alleged break-in periods I could find online support the notion that break-in is almost entirely a myth. The essence is that any physical changes that a speaker undergoes when it is first made to move are almost instantaneous and almost always occur doing factory testing, so any "break-in" ...


8

Simplistically-speaking, a speaker cabinet that is anywhere close to being well-designed shouldn't be adding significant amounts of new harmonic content (as in, frequencies that weren't there before). However, every speaker (cabinet/driver combination) will have a particular frequency response - they will produce some frequencies better than others. Studio ...


7

Having faced this issue some times, the best reccomendation i can give you is first of all, listen to your recordings in various systems, the more, the best, because if you want the world to listen to it, you can never test every system in the world, so, try as many as you can and try to balance for the best in all the systems. Particularly, one of the best ...


7

A tube power amplifier (like the final stage in your Mark V) has to have an output transformer to lower the output impedance (the "Ohms") to a level appropriate to drive a speaker. What does that mean? Well if you know what voltage and current and power are, then one way to look at impedance is how much of the power you are putting out is in voltage and how ...


7

Yes, there can be a difference. The difference will depend on manufacture and quality however, and in some cases there may be no discernible difference. A speaker designed for a sub-woofer is made to have clarity at the lower frequency response spectrum, going as low as around 20 hz. Since the speakers are designed to support just the low frequency range ...


6

The audio signal coming out of a keyboard has all the same characteristics as the signal coming out of a CD player's line-out socket. For home use you just need the same kind of speakers/amplifier as you would use for a CD player. A hi-fi system, or a pair of powered PC speakers will do the job nicely. The "keyboard equivalent" of a guitar amp -- something ...


6

Usually the ohms rating is the minimum the amp is safe with (as when you reduce resistance you increase current) so you are going the safer direction here by using an 8 ohm speaker. So for a 300W amplifier through a 4ohm speaker, using Power = Current squared X Resistance, you can supply up to around 8A. Using your 8ohm speaker the same equation gives your ...


6

It depends on the load requirements of the amplifier and the impedances of the speakers, neither of which you have specified. If the amplifier has a 4 ohm output transformer tap, or it is solid state and well-specified into a 4 ohm load, you can put 2 x 8ohms or 4 x 16ohms in parallel. Similarly if you have 2 x 16ohm speakers you can put them in parallel ...


5

Generally, for low level outputs, such as headphones, the current change due to impedance is unlikely to cause an issue. If you were wanting to connect many headphones it would probably degrade badly, but for just splitting to a second pair I wouldn't bother with an active circuit - just a normal headphone splitter should do just fine.


5

It's really quite simple. Your Hi-Fi stereo speakers are designed to produce the full range audio spectrum that might be found in recordings that you would play through your system. This will include the lowest notes of a bass and a kick drum to the high frequency of a cymbal or highest notes of an 88 key keyboard. The frequency bandwidth that an ...


5

High end engineers do not use headphones for the final mixdown; you need decent quality speakers to do this. In addition, the speakers need to be chosen for the accuracy of the sound reproduction and placed properly in a neutral sounding room. It isn't hard to do this, it just takes some work, and there's lots of information online to do the job properly. ...


5

When you ask if there's a difference in the "actual speakers" I assume you are talking about what, in speaker design parlance, are called the drivers, as opposed to the enclosure or cabinet. Drivers are the transducers with the familiar cone, magnet and coil. Drivers can be very different or very similar. It's impossible to tell without knowing what ...


4

Just mixing with headphones as recommended in a comment, is a bit risky, since the sound differs quite a lot from what you get with a couple of speakers. Some kind of monitors are definitely recommended. A good pair of monitors is obviously preferable, but the important thing is to know your monitors well. If you have a pair of imperfect monitors, but you ...


4

"I see another answer explains that the positioning is to "hear yourself better", but this will be hardly the case for bass amps, since those wavelengths are not very directional. Bass amp isolation from the floor will make little to no difference; low frequencies, the ones produced by the bass, are omnidirectional (unless a special system is used, which is ...


4

A well as turning the monitors down, I would suggest muting the monitor channels and turning down the volume on the monitor if they are independently powered. I know turning the levels right down should remove any voltage across the output, but some mixers seem to still have a DC offset which will cause a pop when the mixer is powered down. Muting on some ...


4

I have never used the Yamaha YDPS51 before, but I have connect powered speakers to my Casio and Korg headphone jacks and it has worked fine. The simple answer to your question is yes, it is safe and worth a try. Although you might experience a loss in sound quality or even a distorted sound due to impedance mismatch. It also depends on the kind of speakers ...


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