17

This could be an instance of portato. Via wikipedia: Portato (Italian, past participle of portare, "to carry") in music denotes a smooth, pulsing articulation and is often notated by adding dots under slur markings. Portato, also known as articulated legato or slurred staccato or semi-staccato or mezzo-staccato, that means "moderately detached"....


11

The first edition (published 1852) had staccatissimo dashes on the first two bars, not staccato dots. You can find it on IMSLP. Old music editions usually assume that the performer had some musical common sense, and in this case (as you guessed) that means the articulations apply until either the music changes or there is an instruction to stop playing them....


10

No. "Staccato" is a more general term than "stab." A stab usually describes an accented note surrounded by rests. Stabs are often used in film scores to add drama and highlight individual actions. An example would be the famous show scene from the film "Psycho." Each stab of the knife is accompanied by an orchestral stab. (This example is unique because it ...


10

Well, it's like a slow tremolo so you definitely want to alternate fingers. Thumb - Middle - Thumb - Middle is a good general-purpose tremolo fingering. To do this easily, you should pull your thumb a little under the palm, almost touching the middle finger. The wrist should be straight but not rigid. You descend upon the keyboard, leading with the thumb. ...


9

Staccato is stem specific rather than head specific. Thus one dot will suffice. The other way would be to make the note actually exactly as long (short!) as you want, then put the appropriate rest. Staccato itself, to me, is a bit vague, and can be interpreted in subtly different ways, as far as note length - brevity - is concerned.


9

There is a difference between "on the string" staccato and "off the string" staccato with a host of subtle variations (such as spiccato, slurred-staccato, martele, and many others.) The type of staccato you use depends on the context and the sound that either your or someone else is looking for. I would consult a bass player for the correct way to perform ...


8

No. A Stab chord may well be staccato. It's not going to be a long note, but it might have a measured length. But its main characteristic is sudden impact. Conversely, staccato notes very often aren't 'stabs'. The two words don't mean the same thing.


7

This is where using more than one voice comes into play.Split the bass clef into two voices one with stems pointing downwards, the others pointing upwards. It's a common thing to do, when effectively there are two separate things happening simultaneously. So the A note underneath will be for three beats, and its stem facing down, and there's a rest above ...


6

It must be a shorthand way of writing what's in the previous bar: instead of writing all three triplets out, he's written one, with the '3' over it, saying it gets played thrice. As each chord needs to be staccato, he's put three dots over it, to signify each staccato.


5

Yes. The slur just indicates that the note should touch the preceding note, but it's still played on time and ended according to the staccato dot. Basically, a slur does not change the last note it reaches but only the notes before it.


5

As Laurence Payne's comment says, you've encountered one form of musical shorthand. There are a few layers of shorthand here so I'll break it down for you. Stripping the first of the first measure of the second line of any shorthand markings, we have just a dotted eighth note. Now we'll look at that slashy mark across the stem. It just means to subdivide ...


5

Usually, there is three types of staccato's, namely a dot (staccato), a wedge (staccatissimo), and a dot under a slur (portato). The general idea is that staccatissimo is the shortest, staccato moderately short, portato still less short. Their exact meaning is up to context and interpretation, like is every musical decision. The problem complicates as some ...


5

OI vopiSeveral posts down, there is an example of correct notation. I copied it from that post. One notates the sound as two voices (thus the quarter rest) with a dotted half in one voice and a quarter rest and two quarter notes in the other voice. It's a common notation when the keyboard plays more than one voice in each hand.


4

Because musical notation is a language. Words in English have many meanings. You determine the meaning based on context, your experience, facial expression, etcetera. Words even change meaning over time. Literally. Musical notation is the same. Each symbol has a range of meaning, and that has changed over time. You need to understand the context in which ...


4

You should play this passage portato, as if each of the note were marked with a tenuto. I.e., you should detach each note, but play them to their full length.


4

I want to clarify something that the current answers haven't yet addressed: staccato doesn't mean short. Rather, staccato means "separated" or "detached." Albeit rare, you can have a staccato whole note; this won't be a short pitch, but it will be separated from the succeeding pitch. Staccato pitches can be stabs, but they don't have to be stabs. As such, ...


4

given that the eighth notes are so short anyway(tempo is quarter note = 138 BPM) "Staccato" literally means "separated," not "short." A staccato eighth note at 138 BPM will still need to be shorter than a regular eighth note at 138 BPM - what matters is the separation of the notes, not the actual duration of the pitch. Personally, I would add the staccato ...


4

Are the first four staccato marked based chords an implication to play the rest as such? Yes. Your intuition is correct. The accompaniment's texture shouldn't change drastically when the melody enters. Burgmuller isn't that subtle. The marked scherzando also implies bouncy rather than lugubrious. Is this implied staccato common practice in sheet ...


3

Opposite to other answers I would suggest that when the right hand entries (leggiero) the accompaniment should be played less staccato or less marcato. The composer could have marked simile if he had wanted to continue the style. I think it is quite natural or musically logical to play the intro different than the accompaniment of this light melody. Edit: ...


3

It's a red herring! It's not a tie, and they're not staccato, per se. It's a separate sign called 'portato',or more accurately and easily understood 'articulated legato', and if it was applied to notes that were not the same, obviously it couldn't be a tie. A slur it would be. Now, you can see that two slurred notes separated because they need to be ...


2

I'll be honest: I'm not a double bass player. However, from my observation of those who are, I can say that lifting the bow seems to be 'the done thing'. A quick Google of 'double bass staccato' gave me this: http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f5/staccato-bowing-579305/ I trust that will be of more use to you.


2

You've gotten some great answers about the specific piece of music - I'll answer the more general question. Legato literally means "bound together" - the sounds are connected. Staccato literally means "detached" - there's a space between the sounds. So you can't have a phrase that is both staccato and legato. But the symbol we use for legato, the curved ...


2

This is an articulation symbol called semi-staccato. It is meant to be performed exactly as its name implies; halfway between smoothly connected and detached, with only a slight disconnect between the notes. For any wind instrument, the semi-staccato notes in bars 2-3 would be performed with a very gentled tonguing on the notes indicated, such as using a "...


2

You certainly do not need a fast speed in order to play with spiccato. If it is very fast the spiccato stroke transforms into sautille but there is no limit as to how slow spiccato can be. Regarding the original question on staccato versus spiccato: ..., so how do you know which technique to use when playing pieces? There is no rule really, it can depend ...


2

I assume you are speaking of that mark: It is not a dot (well, it is, but it does not represent a staccato dot), it's a note, the F from the previous bar that continues on the first beat of the next to last bar. There are two voices at this point, the lower one creating a harmonic movement with C# (the first note of the two beats ornament in the third to ...


2

The slur just means you play all those notes under the same bow stroke, yet with a separation between each note. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portato


1

The tonal difference between bowed staccato and pizzacato is huge to say the least. Us string players can produce extremely short bowed staccato (even before switching to spiccato or ricochet), so don't mark as pizz unless you want that alternate sound. My guess is you don't :-)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible