11

The first edition (published 1852) had staccatissimo dashes on the first two bars, not staccato dots. You can find it on IMSLP. Old music editions usually assume that the performer had some musical common sense, and in this case (as you guessed) that means the articulations apply until either the music changes or there is an instruction to stop playing them....


10

No. "Staccato" is a more general term than "stab." A stab usually describes an accented note surrounded by rests. Stabs are often used in film scores to add drama and highlight individual actions. An example would be the famous show scene from the film "Psycho." Each stab of the knife is accompanied by an orchestral stab. (This example is unique because it ...


8

No. A Stab chord may well be staccato. It's not going to be a long note, but it might have a measured length. But its main characteristic is sudden impact. Conversely, staccato notes very often aren't 'stabs'. The two words don't mean the same thing.


4

Are the first four staccato marked based chords an implication to play the rest as such? Yes. Your intuition is correct. The accompaniment's texture shouldn't change drastically when the melody enters. Burgmuller isn't that subtle. The marked scherzando also implies bouncy rather than lugubrious. Is this implied staccato common practice in sheet ...


4

I want to clarify something that the current answers haven't yet addressed: staccato doesn't mean short. Rather, staccato means "separated" or "detached." Albeit rare, you can have a staccato whole note; this won't be a short pitch, but it will be separated from the succeeding pitch. Staccato pitches can be stabs, but they don't have to be stabs. As such, ...


4

given that the eighth notes are so short anyway(tempo is quarter note = 138 BPM) "Staccato" literally means "separated," not "short." A staccato eighth note at 138 BPM will still need to be shorter than a regular eighth note at 138 BPM - what matters is the separation of the notes, not the actual duration of the pitch. Personally, I would add the staccato ...


4

Because musical notation is a language. Words in English have many meanings. You determine the meaning based on context, your experience, facial expression, etcetera. Words even change meaning over time. Literally. Musical notation is the same. Each symbol has a range of meaning, and that has changed over time. You need to understand the context in which ...


3

Usually, there is three types of staccato's, namely a dot (staccato), a wedge (staccatissimo), and a dot under a slur (portato). The general idea is that staccatissimo is the shortest, staccato moderately short, portato still less short. Their exact meaning is up to context and interpretation, like is every musical decision. The problem complicates as some ...


3

Opposite to other answers I would suggest that when the right hand entries (leggiero) the accompaniment should be played less staccato or less marcato. The composer could have marked simile if he had wanted to continue the style. I think it is quite natural or musically logical to play the intro different than the accompaniment of this light melody. Edit: ...


2

You've gotten some great answers about the specific piece of music - I'll answer the more general question. Legato literally means "bound together" - the sounds are connected. Staccato literally means "detached" - there's a space between the sounds. So you can't have a phrase that is both staccato and legato. But the symbol we use for legato, the curved ...


1

The tonal difference between bowed staccato and pizzacato is huge to say the least. Us string players can produce extremely short bowed staccato (even before switching to spiccato or ricochet), so don't mark as pizz unless you want that alternate sound. My guess is you don't :-)


1

The slur just means you play all those notes under the same bow stroke, yet with a separation between each note. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portato


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