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7

Given that a guitar is about 3' long, hanging on a hook you could put near the ceiling, that gives a good 4' from guitar to floor. Toddler won't reach that for a year or two. Can't see how the gigbag is going to help much, unless he's throwing things around the room. If he is, then try putting him in the gigbag and...


5

If you are worried to that degree, using a hard case for your guitar will give you a lot of extra protection. You could also put the case on top of a wardrobe, or under a bed for safekeeping. Like Tim suggested, I keep most of my guitars (certainly all the expensive ones) hung on the wall. When the kids were little this kept them well out of their reach, ...


5

Bow tension The most important thing you could do for your bow is to keep it loosened when it is not in use. This is something that every string player must do when putting their bow back in the case after playing. Storage Placement-wise, it is best to leave the bow in the case and occasionally take it out into the sun. If you have a long plastic bag (...


5

Many folks keep some of their collectible guitars in display cases or guitar cabinets that may have a glass front to allow viewing of the instrument. However these cases should have a built in humidity control system as it is vitally important to maintain the proper level of relative humidity for your guitars. When storing guitars, one of the most ...


4

I'm pretty certain we have a very similar question here, but I can't find it... Anyway - consensus seems to be that your best bet is to store it on its side if laying it horizontally, or better yet: store it on a guitar stand, vertically. Either of these positions minimise the stress on the neck, frets and strings.


4

While the quarter inch plug is known to be durable so that frequent unplugging should be ok, it is noteworthy that the pickup's preamp might be switched on and off by the plug. This integrated amp typically runs of a 9-volt battery (or sometimes two of them). Leaving it turned on by not unplugging the cord will therefore result in a faster discharge of the ...


4

Where do you live? If the seasons changed dramatically then the guitar would have dried out in the dry seasons, expanded when humid. Temperature changes will also cause expansion and contraction of the wood and this will not be uniform throughout the instrument. This translates to the instrument being a different shape after a year (or less, or more ...


3

The whole thing about spring steel is... it's springy. There are working clocks that have been running for a hundred years without needing a new spring. They might need winding fractionally more than when they were new, but they'll keep going another hundred before they'll need a new spring.


3

1) It does no harm to the connector in the guitar, or amp, or the connectors on the cord, to leave them plugged in. 2) If leaving the cord connected bends the cord tightly, curving it with a small radius, the cord itself or the cord-to-connector joint may be damaged. The vast majority of cord failures happen within 300mm/12inches of the end, usually right ...


3

For a complete beginner, it is normal for the strings to be uncomfortable to press down, especially the E string. Try minimizing your playing time at first, and build it up slowly. Take frequent breaks when your fingertips start hurting. If your strings are too high, it will hurt more, and for longer. Standard height for strings at the end of the ...


3

Storing a guitar strings-down probably isn't the best idea, since putting weight on the strings will grind them against the frets, putting a tiny amount of wear on the strings and frets. It may also be putting the weight of not only the guitar but the case on the guitar's neck, depending on how your case is constructed. I suggest storing the guitar in the ...


3

I have 22 guitars hanging on my wall, ranging from low end Korean to Fender Custom Shop Strats and Teles and Ibanez Prestige and Universes. Except when I am playing them, they have hung, the oldest since 2006 the newest since January 2011. Not one of them has had a problem. I am full-blown AR when it comes to my babies and I would case them immediately if ...


3

Let's take some perspective, and suppose your violin is not new. As the saying goes, your mileage may vary and you might have been lucky in the past, but do not count too much on it. Stretched hair on your bow render it less usable and less springy. It can also induce some warping of the stick. If the hair is too long (usually because it has been left ...


3

From practical experience, the bow would be loosened each time after playing, but the strings would remain in tune. So for long term storage, the bow would naturally be left loose.The strings on my violin - a French made from late 19th Century, left under the stairs in a centally heated house for approx. 10 yrs (yes, I thought I'd lost it in a move!), were ...


2

Unless you are building a sealed case like a humidor, the construction material matters very little. All you should concern yourself with is whether the structure can support the weight of your guitars (and then some). Environmental considerations are addressed in this answer.


2

Regarding hanging guitars on walls.... I 'inherited' an old Epiphone semi-hollow electric guitar that was left behind by a former roommate. The guitar was unplayable; the strings were nearly an inch from the fretboard. I meant to get it set up, but in the interim I hung it on my wall with a guitar hanger. After about 2 years I still hadn't brought the ...


2

I hang mine in a climate controlled space, i use guitar cleaning cloths over the hanger's foam padding to prevent marring the finish. I believe hanging guitars encourages one to play them more often, the necks stay straight and there is more air for the guitar to breathe. I had a really nice Guild D-40 that suffered marring on the neck where the case ...


2

I am no luthier, so I'm not going to claim that whan I say is absolute truth. But I found this site after searching for a bit, and it seems quite correct to me. And yes, it is normal that the distance between the finger board and the strings grow larger the closer to the brigde you get, and it will thusly be harder on the fingers to play closer to the ...


2

Strings don't autonomously tighten, and even under extreme changes in humidity & temperature, they won't tighten anywhere near enough to snap a healthy bridge. Your orchestra violinist there must have had a bridge with a significant flaw in it, and/or a nasty bump/drop applied to the violin while in the case, for the bridge to break. (One other ...


2

The wood of a guitar will swell and shrink in response to changes in humidity and temperature. Unless the instrument is subject to extremes, very hot or very humid/dry, these changes do not affect the instrument other than putting it out of tune. A cabinet, especially one that seals well, can help keep the instrument more stable in regards to the ...


2

Hanging the guitar from a wall hook would allow you to display it as an accessory to your music room or living room and make it easily accessible. As Tim said, high enough to be out of reach of your little curious one. A gig bag would offer protection from dust accumulation, but if you are going to leave it untouched long enough to accumulate dust - then ...


2

I have never heard of mold sneaking in. Do you happen to live in some tropical climate, or are you just worrying? If you don't already have one, get some kind of reed case which holds the reeds gently but firmly onto a flat surface such as plate glass. I can't stress strongly enough how important to reed life it is to keep the bottom face flat. The ...


2

If you have a problem with reeds getting mouldy you could try it. Otherwise, don't. Wooden items generally suffer more from drying out and cracking than from being moist.


2

For regular cleaning I would just use mild soap and water. Anything more powerful could damage metall or pads of the instrument. Since mould actually cries for something else, e.g. vinegar, I would dispose that soft case.


1

Most of the fabric used for cases (that I see in the US) is Nylon or Nylon based fabric. For a slip cover that goes over a hard case such as you find on Flute and sometimes Clarinet cases, you should be able to hand wash the slip cover with washing soap. For soft covered hard cases, such as covered plywood or covered Styrofoam, you can't really wash them ...


1

If conditions are not good for people, there not good for your instrument. Temperature and humidity should be moderate. You can help protect your instrument by putting it into a bag made for it or in a cloth or t-shirt (which I sometimes use for my cello). Close the case completely. Keep the strings in tune so the sound post won't shift. The bow should be ...


1

Amplifiers contain capacitors, which have dielectric materials that dry out and break down over time, and high heat accelerates that process. Transformers have lacquered wires that experience the same kind of failures. Polyethylene and other plastic insulation on wires will become brittle. Storing your amplifier in high heat will not damage it, per se, ...


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