13

Yes, you can use thinner gauged strings to reduce tension and make the strings easier to bend. For electric guitar strings, the standard is usually around .009 or .010 inches for the high-E string (Sets are usually labelled by the gauge of the high-E string. The gauges of the rest of the set mostly depend on how thick the high-E is, but there are also ...


13

Any change in string gauge will cause a neck to move over time, unless you adjust the truss rod to compensate. Movement would be expected to have stopped & settled to its newly-balanced position within two weeks, with no other influencing factors. Primary shift would be within 24 hours. I think the advice you were given was rather limited; which makes ...


11

Optimum bridge position is all tied up with the position of the sound post (which can be moved) and the bass bar (which can't). There's also the matter of getting used to playing a fiddle with non-standard dimensions, which may be counter-productive. A new bridge isn't expensive. Treat the violin to one, and a set of standard weight strings.


8

Upgrading to a slightly heavier string gauge (as you have proposed) will not always necessitate a new set up. Upgrading to a much heaver gauge will increase the likelihood that adjustments will be needed. There are two main things to look for when going to a heavier gauge string. First, heavier strings will result in more tension on the neck and could ...


8

Lots of factors can lead to string breakage. As a general rule of thumb, lighter-gauge strings are easier to break than heavier-gauge strings. For a beginner, on an acoustic guitar (as indicated in the comments) .012s or .013s should not cause any problems; I wouldn't worry about fancy coatings or string alloys with respect to string breakage (these features ...


7

It's more common to bend each of the top three - E, B and G -strings, so maybe you could consider keeping the lower three. There are sets out there with something like 'top skinny' as a guide. Otherwise, do as I do, and have for 40+ yrs, buy individual strings. Ever so slightly more expensive, but when you've decided exactly what gauge you need for each, 10 ...


7

There's little difference, and always the possibility that the two guitars aren't the same scale length exactly anyway. You won't have to bend quite so much to get the same semitone/tone bend, and using ears is really the only way to accomplish this properly. Imagine being on stage and relying on a tuner?! Vibrato will be slightly easier, but be careful not ...


6

Any vibrato is set up as a balance between the strings and the springs. So once that balance is achieved, it shouldn't make much if any difference whether they're .008s or .013s. Obviously the bendability will be different, but that's a different issue. You may also need to check action and intonation.


5

The lighter the gauge the easier it is to bend but that does not mean it is automatically better. I do find some of the finer dynamics of vibrato and bending are lost in the lighter string tensions. Sure you can bend higher easier but subtle vibratos become harder as a consequence. Also the loss of tension in regards to bending does make it harder to bend ...


5

Back in the early '60s, there was only a 'standard' set available, so take it or leave it. Then guitarists started using banjo strings, and putting a 2nd in place of a 3rd, etc. Since then, string makers have given us a huge choice in gauges. 'Standard' most likely means a set of .010s,which seems to be what a lot of manufacturers put on new, but some ...


5

In general, smaller-gauged strings will come up to the same pitch at a lower tension. They're easier to bend. They'll also have less "oomph" as a consequence, but amplification can mitigate some loss of volume. As for technique, you want all three of your big fingers all pushing or pulling together. Don't worry about bending with a single finger alone until ...


5

I agree with what you heard that if you drop all the strings two frets you want to go up at least one step in string gauge. Perhaps two. I played two frets down in one band and I ended up stringing 12s for that, so to me, 11s certainly make sense. Drop B is a big difference for the lowest string. It’s gonna be floppy, but unless you get a custom gauge ...


4

I guess you mean the SCALE of the Special's neck is shorter, as in the length from nut to bridge. If this is so, the strings like for like, should actually be looser than those on the Ibanez, for the same tuning.It sounds like the ACTION is too high on the Special, making the strings harder to press as they have further to go to get to the fretboard.The ...


4

Due to the difference in total string tension, you will have to reconfigure the springs in the bridge so that it floats in the same position as it does now, so that your action and intonation is unaffected by the string change. This could take as little as a change in the angle in one or two strings, by moving them from different hooks on the anchor plate, ...


4

Yes, you will need to set it up again. There are two essential reasons for any guitar -- bow, and intonation. (For those with tremolo bridges, other responses have already addressed that.) Bow: The string gauge effectively determines the total tension on the guitar neck, when the string are tuned to pitch. (Note that this affects those who change tunings ...


4

The answer to this question is related / depends on each instrument/player. One thing you didn't mention and is important is that heavier strings might make more tension and stress on the violins neck/fingerboard. Trying to address your questions: Yes. But this change is bigger between different brands than different gauge on same brand. Depends. If you ...


4

It's obviously better to replace the string with its actual string, but as I'm sure you're aware the adjacent strings are a similar gauge and should not pose any issues, if you don't make a habit out of it. I'd suggest stringing it up with the 3rd octave E String and ordering a replacement string as soon as possible. It would be more harmful to leave that ...


4

I personally would not try it. I think it's a bad idea for several reasons. Reason One - Doubling the 4 wound (fattest strings) might put more tension on the neck than the guitar is built to handle. A Twelve string guitar already has far more tension on the neck than a six string. The fact that 12 strings add more tension is the reason many folks ...


4

Lost count of the students that I changed strings from .010 to .009 and even .008. But that's not the whole solution. There's the action, which may need tweaking, even (especially) on a new guitar. If you're struggling with new barre chords, that's a couple of ideas. Another, specially if you only play by yourself, is to do the almost obligatory tuning down,...


4

It is true that lighter strings will require less finger strength and less exertion to press the strings down onto the frets. If you are struggling with barre chords to get enough pressure on the strings to make them play without muting some of the strings, it is possible that lighter strings will help until you build up strength and or improve your ...


4

Unfortunately upright bass strings don’t typically give diameter measurements like electric bass strings do. Instead they are usually identified by gauge or tension, light, medium and heavy. This combined with the fact that they cost a lot of money makes it hard to select one with confidence. For jazz I prefer a brighter string like a D’Addario Helicore ...


3

Apparently nylon Lyre strings are not readily available but I was able to locate one on-line seller offering the equivalent of nylon Lyre strings. From the site: These modern Fluorocarbon strings are a better alternative to plain nylon and are very popular with harp and ukulele as they produce a clear and strong sound, On lyres this is very effective on ...


3

I expect the intonation will be a little off, which is easily fixed on hardtail electrics with patience, an electronic tuner and a screwdriver. You probably wouldn't notice it much and can go a while without doing so. And, trust someone who knows, don't adjust the bridge while the string is under tension. I can show you the scrapes in the metal on some of ...


3

A few ideas... Pitch: Play the correct pitch with a non-bent 'reference' note and then compare your bent note to that. Do this over and over attempting to match the pitch as closely as possible. For the high E bend in the Sandman solo, if you have a 22 fret guitar you might need to hit a harmonic over the point where a 24th fret would be to get your ...


3

Yes, you can find string gauges in the odd sizes, depending on the manufacturer. I've filled odd sets by pulling from a couple different makers. You can check with Dunlop and D'Addario. As mentioned in the comments, there sometime is very little difference in a single gauge change. I have measured strings with digital calipers and found that there can be ...


3

It's all but impossible to play 12 strings in tune. The problem is usually the intonation. Each string needs to be a subtly different length - even on a humble 6 string, you'll notice each saddle is placed differently. That's easy on an electric, solved by having 6 separate saddles. Even acoustics get round this by having a sort of slanting bridge. Problem'...


3

I don't think there's any secret aspect of guitar setup that can make strings seem less stiff, but for general ease of playing with stiffer strings it's worth checking that the action of your guitar isn't too high. If it is, you'll be having to put in extra effort to push the strings down, as well as bend them side to side. It is possible that due to the ...


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