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3

There are a lot of factors to consider here. When analyzing the tone that is produced by the attack we usually use a simplified model in which the string is ideal and fixed at the two ends by immovable rigid constraints. We also don't consider changes in length of the string due to stretching as it moves, etc. This is not a bad model for a solid body ...


-1

The plucking position affects the high frequencies roughly like this: closer to the bridge : brighter closer to the neck : mellower The author of this paper claims to have been able to write an algorithm that determines the plucking location of the string by listening to the sound: https://www.ee.columbia.edu/~dpwe/papers/TraubS01-guitar.pdf Quote: 2. ...


1

A good thing about Guitars is that these were not traditionally part of the Classical Music Instrument Families but rather one that came to a good from only around the late 18th Century. These have roots from different Instruments especially the Lute just to mention. Since Guitars weren't a part of Traditional Instrument Families, You have the freedom to ...


1

I hear double bass (the low rumble) and cello (the raspy aggressiveness). Bass and cello are a common combination. There might possibly maybe potentially be bassoon too? Cello and bassoon is another common combination.


2

That's a double bass (or maybe 2-4) being played aggressively. It sounds like the mic is really close to the strings. Lots of reverb, and you're there. The entire track has been agressively processed, the violin that comes in at 0:03 is just nasty.


6

They are simply called "five-string violins" in the English language, and usually combine the viola and the violin's ranges. Other stringed instruments that have 5 strings are generally of the viol family, e.g. the pardessus de viole which could have 5 or 6 strings, or the quinton which specifically has 5 strings.


0

It doesn't matter how you play if you like the way it sounds and feels. There are traditional ways to play any instrument which are widely accepted for the tone produced, efficiency and economy of motion, etc. but ultimately it's up to the player. If you like the tone but not the feeling, try a new way. Perhaps a left-handed guitar strung right-handed so ...


2

It's a known phenomenon. Some people call it "true pitch" to distinguish it from full-fledged, all-instruments perfect pitch. I remember some YouTube videos talking about it, if I can find them again I'll post the links.


0

I am familiar with 'Nashville Strung' or 'High Strung' guitar situations, but not Nashville tuning. In Nashville Strung, a standard six-string guitar is strung with the typical three light-guage (un-wound) on the bottom three strings, and the three upper (normally wound, heavier strings) are replaced with the same three light-gauge strings. This creates ...


2

I am an amateur music learner. Here are my 2 cents Answer these questions: Can you identify a single note on the cello 95% of time? Have you tried the same melody on another instrument first and then on cello? My guess is that there is bias of known melody. My theory is: your years of training with cello have had a heavy effect on your ear training. It ...


3

does this count as perfect pitch, or is it just finely tuned relative pitch? Not an ideal answer to hear, but it's a mix of both. Firstly, yes, this is a phenomenon and you'll rest easy knowing that it is much more likely for musicians to be able to more accurately identify exact pitches when played on their primary instrument as opposed to an instrument ...


16

You might be listening to the timbre of the different notes. I remember watching this video , where the person describes learning perfect pitch from the timbre of the instrument. His process is to become familiar with the timbre of different notes and then mentally playing the instrument in his head in order to find the correct pitch when he hears it from a ...


5

If you have perfect pitch then it doesn't matter if it's an instrument, voice or the hum of an electronic device. It sounds to me like you have developed very good relative pitch. Since you are most familiar with the cello, then it makes sense that your ears would respond best to that instrument.


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