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4

Flamenco requires very crisp response for fast, powerful melodic play even in the bass register (as well as for parts that would in other styles be played on specialised bass instruments). That requires high-tension bass strings: lower tension strings would clatter a lot against the frets, which would obscure the actual notes played. On the other hand, for ...


19

As a bowmaker, I'd like to expand upon Carl's answer. The question of the scales seems to be answered by microphotographs of bow hair, which show all the scales to be gone once the hair is played in, and thus to play no role in grippiness. All I can add is that it is a complex issue. My tendency is to reverse half the hair in violin family instruments, ...


14

Not too hard to find some strong opinions from skilled luthiers. Here's what DavidFinck wrote in a blogpost. That’s a great question. Every hank I have received is knotted at the root end. The tips of the hair are identifiable because they taper to a point (they usually darken towards the tip as well). There are two premises for making a choice of ...


2

It's unusual for a laptop to have any Earth at all. It will also probably have a nasty buzzy, whiny switch-mode PSU. If you live in a country where Earthing is optional on mains sockets, you may end up having to carry a physical earth strap & find a pipe to fasten it to. We really need more detail on the interface, the computer & your country's ...


1

This seems like two questions in one. The intonation on a classical guitar is always going to be somewhat approximate as the saddle can be considered 'one size fits all' or 'set and forget' at best; you can't alter the individual string lengths on a classical guitar. Polishing will change the diameter of the bass strings slightly (assuming you only polish ...


4

Unless it has an adjustable truss-rod, I wouldn't. The tension will be considerably less than steel strings & as a consequence the neck will start to drop backwards. The action will probably already be too low the first day you put them on, & a fortnight later will probably be nothing but buzz. Even with an adjustable truss-rod, you might find the ...


1

Unless the guitars are individually built guitars and not "shop" produced, then they likely follow standard, traditional construction. I have personally never run across building instructions that take into account different string tensions in regards to the face and bracing, although I am not a classical guitar maker, and things may have changed or be ...


1

Best approach is the conservative one. Find a luthier and have them evaluate the instrument. Using high-tension strings on older instruments can possibly cause irreparable damage.


2

Just about anything. Classical/Romantic composers didn't go in for 'quirky' combinations like piccolo/tuba much, there wasn't the modern obsession for novelty-above-all. But apart from that they tried out most possible combinations. The 'rules' are not really about what instrument blends well with what other. They're about choosing instruments which suit ...


2

You look at the notes in the scale. Whichever of them happens to be E, A, D, G or B, (or an enharmonic equivalent) can potentially be played with an open string, at least from the one octave. And assuming that your guitar is tuned to regular E A D G B E tuning. The C major scale doesn't have any sharps or flats, and its notes are: C, D, E, F, G, A, B From ...


2

Long notes: On violin you can play a long note, you can change the sound quality while playing, you can change the dynamic like make a crescendo. On piano there are several options to compensate for that: A) You can make a trill. B) You can make a tremolo chord either fast unmeasured tromolo or slower measured tremolo. C) You can have melodic lines in ...


1

First the obvious: a violin's range only goes down to G3, and it has much more limited capabilities for polyphony. In fact you're probably well-advised to use no more than double-stops, i.e. two-note chords: a single third, fourth, fifth and sixth can generally be played quite well, but even they shouldn't be lined up to fast runs unless you're writing for a ...


3

It's always a bad idea to put steel strings on an instrument not designed for them. The tension is a lot higher than nylon & could result in a bent neck, the bridge coming away or at worst a broken headstock or neck.


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