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1

Go by the sound, there is no specific time frame. The more you play the faster they wear out. Guitar strings last about 2-3 days honestly before the sound starts to decline if you play a lot or professionally. If you’re playing gigs, I would change before every show. To those that will say your guitar won’t stay in tune, make sure you stretch them when you ...


1

It is basically playing all 4 strings consecutively creating an "undulation". HOWEVER, not in the staccato slurred style, just the slur (not staccato ie not ricochet bowing) It is called "arpeggio" whether it is staccato or legato or whatever articulation is indicated. It can also be done over 3 strings. Here are two examples from famous ...


1

To be precise, the notation generally doesn’t (and shouldn’t) specify an exact technique. The notation should specify an intended sound and the player(s) would determine which technique is best to create the sound based on the context. Modern notation style and interpretation of the quoted passage is that each group of four notes is to be played with a ...


1

That all depends on your style, preference and your guitar setup. I highly recommend DR: Drop-Down Tuning electric guitar strings. I have the DR DDT-12 (12-60) on my Ibanez-RG drop-C tuning. I play Melodic Death Metal and I have my action set very low and the DDT's have an amazingly heavy/crunchy tone without sacrificing clarity or string tension. They also ...


2

I guess you've already done the obvious Google search? But just in case you haven't, here's one source. (There are several others.) I'm sure they all emphasise the warning that there's a lot of tension on a piano string and,while the harp is unlikely to break, an individual string might, and you don't want it whipping across your face.


2

https://www.fmicassets.com/Damroot/Original/10001/Fender_Ed_O_Brien_Stratocaster_0140192305_SM_REV_A_11-08-2017.pdf The manual for you guitar (link above) gives recommendations on adjusting pickup height and sustainer potmeters (in the sustainer cavity at the back of your guitar). I think it would be wise to follow them, and experiment a bit to find the ...


1

I've been using an E-bow for several years now. As in your case the higher strings do not respond very well. Here a list of what you could try: Using a sustainer you need sometimes to use a strong left hand finger vibrato to get it rolling because the magnetic pickup of the sustainer needs something to be fed with to create the feedback cycle. Working on ...


0

It's a wound string on a classical guitar, by the clues. There's most likely a problem either with the winding, or the core - or both, that isn't easy to find, visually. As a stop gap, with no spare (why not?), maybe it's better than not having a D string at all, but the sensible thing to do is replace with a new one. If that new one makes the others - ...


2

To complete on @LaurencePayne 's answer: from the info you give I would assume you are talking about a classical guitar (edit: I now see the tags…), which strings are not ball-ended. If not, you would not have been able to put it back. If that is correct, you took some length from the peg to compensate the amount you lost. Doing so, you brought some "...


1

Does "sharper as if it's acoustic" mean something about the tone-colour? I guess this is an electric guitar then? Are the pickup poles individually adjustable? Perhaps the string's just worn out. A worn-out string typically sounds duller rather than 'sharper' though. Go on, lay out for a new string!


1

Without more info we can only guess: If the string is slipping it will go down in pitch quickly while tuning or playing. If that happens, the best thing to do is to unwind it, remove the string from the peg, and put it back properly. If you're not sure how to do that, look online for some instructional videos on how to install strings correctly, so they can'...


0

I use 8-38. I am always tuned to C standard. I set up my guitars specifically for this. It can be done with a Floyd Rose also by using 2 springs (spaced on outside positions) to keep the bridge flat. I have no tuning issues. My necks are flat. I have no intonation issues. My guitars have very low action, and 24.75" scale (shorter/less tension.) I ...


4

The most durable are coated strings. The coating prevents impurities from getting in between the wounds, which is the main cause of the bass string loosing brightness. If you aim not to change the strings often, they are certainly worth their price. The second consideration should be string thickness or tension. Thinner and lighter strings sound brighter and ...


3

There's fishing wire which is made of metal, and there's fishing line which is just a nylon string and has no metal. The video shows fishing line made of nylon string. Just as fishing line might work as a temporary string on an acoustic guitar, a length of fishing wire might work as a temporary string on an electric guitar. Some brands (and/or models) of ...


10

Nylon fishing line is commonly used for African instruments such as the kora and ngoni, as a matter of convenience. Strings were previously leather, but of course nylon is better. Nylon fishing line would also work on the upper strings of classical guitars, with perhaps some issues on string tension if you can't get the right thickness of strings. It would ...


1

Doubtful that the fishing line would endure the the "string tension" needed to tune to pitch. For a standard electric pick-up, no. Metal strings are needed. Carry an extra set in a sealed baggie. Keep playing :-)


12

Metal, but not just any metal. Both steel-string and classical acoustic guitars generally use metal, such as bronze or silver-played copper, for the windings to add mass and lower the frequency, but they don't have much magnetic metal, so they don't work well with soundhole pickups, which are magnetic like electric guitar pickups. Most electrified acoustic ...


33

It won't work, unless you're using a piezo system which induces current from physical vibrations. An electric guitar works because the magnetic field around the vibrating strings induces current in the coils of the pickup. So the strings must have some ferrous content for the EM-induction to take place. It could conceivably work on a guitar like the ...


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