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16

My answer is ultimately similar to Bob Broadley's, but has one difference that can make for much more readable scores in slightly more complex situations. This is the standard notation for broken held chords like the one you describe, as recommended by Kurt Stone and Gardner Read: The difference here is that you don't rewrite any of the held notes until the ...


14

The sustain (damper) pedal on a studio piano pushes a rod which connects to the lever which connects to the dampers. This is adjustable with a screw, to allow the dampers to rest on the strings (apart from the top octave or so) with the correct pressure, when the pedal is at rest. It sounds like the dampers are not pressing enough. It won't be a feature, and ...


13

To answer the parts of your question specific to the piano, it's entirely acceptable to allow the sound to die away. Silence is a part of music too, or we wouldn't have rests. One way to get more sustain, though, is to use a concert grand piano. (I'm being a bit facetious, of course--I don't have $50,000+ kicking around and you probably don't either--but ...


13

No. A sustain pedal is a simple switch with a piece of cable attached that the keyboard uses to emulate the function of the sustain pedal on the piano - which basically means "let ring the notes when the pedal is depressed even if you lift your fingers off the keys". A sustainer pedal is a compressor, which is a thing that that limits the dynamic range of ...


12

I would differ from Wheat Williams’ answer. The sustain pedal is essential. A variable-resistance sustain pedal, often marketed as “half-damper”, will also make a world of difference: non-variable-resistance have an entirely different feel, and your son starts on those, then he will have to largely re-learn his sustain pedal usage when he gets to a real ...


9

You have the lowest string tuned to A# instead of E: that's a whole augmented fourth lower than designed. That's rather loose. As a result, the string's tendency to straighten out the "kink" from plucking the string is lower than usual, and while the string is kinky, its overall tension is larger than when it is swinging in sinoidal manner, making it a bit ...


8

Guitars are already rich in overtones and harmonics. Experiment with the position of your right hand. Picking near the neck emphasises the fundamental frequency. Picking nearer the bridge brings out more overtones. The biggest differences between a guitar and a violin are the size of the instrument, and the fact that a violin is bowed. You could try ...


8

A lot of the time, you won't be pressing the sustain pedal anyway. Yes, it sounds 'good', but you're already tiring of the novelty. Timing is all. Press the pedal AFTER you play a note/chord, and release your hand while the pedal's still down. When the next note is ready to be played, press that note, let pedal go, and press pedal again before lifting ...


8

TL;DR If I were you, I would care only about the sustain, and made sure the piano and the pedal support more than just on and off states. Surely, if your son keeps practicing there will be a time when the other pedals will start to make a difference. However, you should think then about getting an acoustic piano. The three main pedals of the piano are: ...


8

This is completely normal behavior of plucked and hammered strings. The average tension is slightly higher when the physical amplitude of the string's vibration is greater. The higher tension leads to a higher restitution force which leads to a shorter period which is the same as a higher frequency which means a sharp note. As the amplitude of vibration dies ...


7

Fermatas do not have a specific length. You would just hold the note longer than the value for effect typically at the discretion of the performer or conductor based on what kind of effect you want. For this specific piece, the tempo is pretty fast so any piano should be able to sustain it easily and the piece is well known enough that you can listen to how ...


7

You hold a fermata until it stops crying. Or rather, until you have the attention of the audience and before you lose it again. In a room with reverbation, you stop until the onset of a p will overcome the remaining reverb of an ff. There is a fresh start after a fermata, and you should make it appear like that. With a sustaining instrument like an organ,...


7

If it's for both guitars, I guess it's probably not the guitars themselves. Having said that, old strings can cause loss in sustain or if they've both got damp or something. Or muck on the bridge, or if you've changed gauge of strings to lighter ones. Do they both play with good sustain unplugged ? ie, same as before ? Assuming the guitars are ok, and your ...


6

This is probably caused by at least one of these things: The damper pedal is slightly out of regulation, and is holding the dampers slightly off the strings. (Easy fix) The dampers are old and tired and don't dampen as well as they used to. (Expensive to replace) The dampers are under-built: actually too small for the length of the piano strings, usually ...


6

The idea is that you are adding mass to the headstock, which increases the mechanical impedance at the nut, which reduces the rate of energy transfer from the string to the headstock, which increases the energy reflected back down the string. If the mechanical impedance at the nut is already high (as it ideally would be), then adding a bit to the impedance ...


5

Basically, I think my question is, how do I get that much sustain? Well, you don't really. It depends on the piano, but since it is not a sustained instrument, such as winds or strings, the sound will die away. The only thing you can act on is the timing, which brings me to a point which seems greatly overlooked in the other answers, that is of the ...


5

Slim's answer already covers some of this, but I just want to emphasize how massively rich in overtones any guitar is. Only a pure sine wave doesn't have overtones, any natural instrument is rich in them (in fact each overtone is a sine wave). The only spectral difference between a violin and a guitar lies in which overtones are most present, and what their ...


5

Overdriven, distorted guitar sounds contain loads of harmonics, and tend to emphasise them quite well. By experimenting with these sorts of sounds, along with different pup settings, and plucking in different places on your strings, you may come close.Valve amps do it better, but there are several pedals also.


5

There is no rule requiring you to use the sostenuto pedal only for notes that have already sounded. In a composition that works as you described, capturing them in advance is a perfectly fine and obvious solution. (In fact, modern compositions sometimes use silent keypresses and the sostenuto pedal for notes that are never sounded, just made to resonate by ...


4

I would take a trial and error approach. Plug your guitar directly into your amp and test sustain without the effects. Then add in each pedal until you notice your sustain lacking. As Matthew suggested, it's highly probable that one of your pedals has a noise gate built into it that you didn't realize. I bought a multi effects pedal a long time ago, and when ...


4

Sometimes it will be obvious to a performer that you need to sustain notes that together outline one particular harmony (a single triad, for instance). If you want to make this explicit, though, you could use notation such as the following: I'm not sure that this is used that much in piano music, probably because the pedal will produce the required effect (...


4

On a normal piano, the left pedal is pressed to make the sound quieter. It does this by moving the whole hammer mechanism closer to the strings on most uprights, and often by moving the mechanism to one side on grands. thus it's less distance for the strike to take place. On some pianos, there is a practice pedal, often the middle of three, which brings a ...


4

Bit too much for a comment, but not really an answer as yet… Some things to check - the Clavinova very likely is capable of using & sending the entire scale of CC64 [pedal]. The sequencer [or the VSTi] might only be using switch values of 0 & 127, or the worst, it toggles at values 63/64, making your pedal data well out from where you thought you ...


3

There's no general rule. Use it to sustain whatever the music needs to be sustained. In the first example you showed us, the pedal could "catch" the low C and sustain it throughout the bar. The same harmony persists - it's a C major chord all the way - so there's no chance of an ugly smear. So I'd press it with the first LH note and keep it down for the ...


3

You just play all the notes at the right time and do what pianists call "legato pedalling". Ask one to show you. Much easier to demonstrate than describe. Any recording of Gymnopedie will show you what the result sounds like.


3

The sustain pedal can also be used (on a real piano) for a muting effect. You strike a chord, release the keys, and a split second after you release the keys you depress the sustain pedal. If done well, this produces a sforzando effect: the chord is initially loud but then echos on quietly. Takes practice.


3

The explanation matches exactly the phenomenon of a dead spot: a resonance in the guitar's neck that causes the mechanical impedance at that frequency to almost vanish, thus quickly draining that note's energy. This isn't an issue many guitarists think too much about (though quite a few instruments have slight dead spots, they're usually not so pronounced ...


3

You need to understand that a "clean sine wave" has no higher harmonics at all. A periodic signal (i.e., one with a clearly defined pitch) is generally a superposition of sine waves with frequencies that are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency of the signal. I.e., if you play an A at 440 Hz you will have harmonics at 2x440=880 Hz, 3x440=1320 Hz, ...


3

Basically, you want the sustain part of the tone increased in relation to the attack part. There are three ways to do that with amps settings/ effects: either you increase the gain of the amp, you add an overdrive effect, or you add a compression effect. The first and second will alter your tone more or less drastically, the third should be a lot less ...


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