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15

What you seek, my friend, is "the groove". As you're discovering, there's more to it than the mechanical (or even mathematical) approach of playing certain notes with a triplet rhythm. While your approach is technically correct, I'm guessing it lacks the feeling you're looking for. That's what's known as "groove" or being "in the pocket" or (especially ...


10

There are many things that could be going wrong, but in my experience, not swinging (or having a bad swing feel) is usually a result of small technique-related issues. In particular, it can include: (a) not playing the different pieces in unison, (b) playing the triplet rhythms unevenly, and (c) playing certain pieces too loud. All of these things can be ...


9

The second E and the C of the triplet on the third beat are purely ornamentation. Try playing the phrase without them, you'll find that you'll automatically swing those two notes. Then try to fit the triplet in the first (swing-elongated) eighth.


8

I honestly don't think you will find many people trying to give an earnest, precise, definition of "forward momentum" in music. It's quite a general and subjective term - a bit like saying that something is 'upbeat', or 'laid back', or 'soulful'. Nevertheless, perhaps we can have a look at some references to forward momentum in a variety of sources, and ...


8

What you named "Swing time option 2" is the standard notation of swinged eight notes and triplets used in jazz scores. See e.g. this example of Dizzy Gillispie's Night in Tunisia: Note that the word "swing" is not even written in the score, as it is left to the musician's taste whether and how deeply swing the eight notes. Edit: It was ...


7

I don't entirely agree with the other answers I see here. From my experience, as well as looking at quantization values offered in DAWs, a swing feel can be varied, sometimes based on genre but other times based on the style of the players and/or composer. The concept of swinging is that the note value that is swung, in your example the 1/8 note, is pushed ...


7

"In time" indicates that the tempo should be fairly strict, as opposed to the intro marked "freely", which indicates that you have freedom to push and pull as you feel. It's often the case that a "free" intro will be slower than the main part of the song, but not always. Sometimes, for example, the intro will consist of a series of block chords which are ...


7

I tend to think of swing as the 12/8 version of 4/4. So two lots of 6/8 is pretty close, watching the 'second bar' of 6/8 for emphasis, or lack of. Having said that, there's swing and hard swing, where the rhythm is closer, but not too near, to dotted quaver/semi. Someone did actually time and work out the proportions of various jazzers, and there is a ...


7

If you study the timings of human players, you will notice that they almost never play mechanically exactly what the theoretical written values would be. Timings, pitches, dynamics, everything. Musical notation is a means of written communication about musical ideas from humans to humans. It's meant to be subjectively interpreted by a performer. Exact ...


6

I would use a duplet for this. If it we notated the groove in 12/8, this would be the standard notation: X:1 L:1/8 M:12/8 K:C %%score T1 V:T1 clef=treble % 1 [V:T1] C2 D E2 F (2GA B2 (c | c4) ...which is actually nothing else but X:1 L:1/8 M:12/8 K:C %%score T1 V:T1 clef=treble % 1 [V:T1] C2 D E2 F G3/2A3/2 B2 (c | c4) By extension, I ...


6

Too bad they didn't say if they meant "swing 8ths" or "swing 16ths". But the duration of three 1/16 triplets is the same as one 1/8th note. Here is how to count one and two and three and four and. A triplet means that more stuff is squeezed in the same space. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuplet#Triplet Do you mean to ask, if "swing&...


5

ggcg's comment is correct. practice. Specifically practice sight reading. Sight reading is just learning to recognize patterns you've seen before. The only way to do this is see them a lot. Maybe ask the musical director for some parts to take home each week (pieces you aren't already playing) and read them at home. Don't read them two days in a row. ...


5

Assuming these are informal jams, you just don't have the authority to fire incompetents. I think the only possibility is to endure the fact that the material will not be played correctly. But do at least point out what "swing" means when they try to "correct" those who are playing it correctly. Is it tactless to teach someone the truth?


5

Much easier with a drummer, especially a good one.Think 12/8 time, as in basic 4 in a bar, but each beat is split into triplet quavers. Play on the first and third of some - not all - of the triplets, making the first legato and the third more staccato. Saying the old English nursery rhyme helps : "Humpty Dumpty ", to give a swing feel. Sometimes play a ...


5

From a quick google search and scanning an article, it seems to be a reference to the expectation of "what's next". In music, momentum is created every time you do something that makes the listener think that something else is about to happen. Here is the article: http://www.secretsofsongwriting.com/2013/10/30/5-ways-to-create-momentum-in-a-song/


5

Swing feel is not triplets! It's approximately a triplet but unless you're Elvin Jones, if you play it in strict triplets then it sounds almost as bad as playing it square (as eighths). Paul Berliner in "Thinking in Jazz" writes: Within the realm of beat subdivision, myriad nuances of phrasing in between an even eighth-note subdivision feel, a dotted-...


5

Swing is not just about the length of the two notes, but also where the emphasis is placed. In swing, the 2nd 8th note (or eighth note following the quarter if thinking in 12/8) is stronger, with more emphasis. I think "doo-BA." The "doo" is longer, but the "BA" is accented. The accent on the 2nd note is part of what creates the syncopated feel in jazz. If ...


4

Honestly you should bring in some tennis balls and make a game out of it. I've taught this with eurhythmics before. Basically have people walk to a beat and start bouncing the ball on the 8th note, and then after they do that comfortably have them do the same, only swing it. You can work with whatever rhythms you need in this way and it feels kind of silly ...


4

If you're playing straight and switch to playing swing, the 'and's move but the strong beats don't. It might be that the players who are trying to play swung are pushing the strong beats around too, which would be disconcerting to the other players. I'd suggest an exercise where everyone plays the same line (a fragment of a scale for instance) first ...


4

The only way I am aware of improving (or practicing) swing feel is to play with a metronome but set it so the click is on the 2 and 4. Emily Remler goes through it in her tutorial videos. I have no idea how this would translate to a group jam though!


4

In the interests of learning how to play effectively all over the fretboard, you should probably learn to play without using any of the open strings. That way you will be able to play those same swing riffs in any key simply by changing your hand position up and down the neck. If you use the open strings you will just learn to play them using open strings. ...


4

The excellent answer by jdjazz covers swing drum technique in depth. If the problem is more one of feel, see this jazz lesson video by Aimee Nolte, “How to Freaking Swing”: Rather than focusing on triplet rhythms, Nolte emphasizes the anticipatory nature of swung rhythms. The meat of the lesson starts at 4:37, where she ...


4

I'm not quite clear what you're after, but all these notations are used and understood. (Though they don't all mean the same thing!) Swing is not triplets. If you don't believe me, listen to 'Blueberry Hill'. If you really want triplets, write them, or use 12/8 meter.


4

Tempo is an absolute, measurable value. 'Forward momentum' is a subjective description of a rather nebulous concept. In one way, all music has forward momentum - it exists on a time-scale that certainly can't go backwards! We could describe a Death March as having an inevitable, un-stoppable forward momentum. A Swing rhythm moves forward, but so does a ...


4

Write it out normally, and at the top say 'swing' and/or crotchet=2 tied triplet quavers and a single quaver. But in dots!


4

plays each 2 quavers in 'shuffle' style 2/12+1/12 instead of 1/8+1/8 That's exactly what he is supposed to do! When you see this at the start of a piece, you are basically told not to play straight eighths, but shuffle eighths (triplets like they are shown above -- that would be 2/12 and 1/12 like you said, although I've never heard anyone call them that). ...


4

This question veers into "Opinion-based" land, I fear. My gut response goes something like: For the paired eighth notes: If you write straight eighths but mark the music "In Swing Rhythm," Then the performers will know what to do and can adjust the magnitude of the swing (not necessarily an exact triplet). But if you write quarter + ...


4

An 8th triplet among swung 8ths is played as a normal triplet. But now you've shown us the piece: The pick-up bar (and bars 6 & 8) are NOT triplets. The beaming in your example is very confusing. The 3-groups that are NOT triplets (i.e. most of them) should be beamed as a single note then a beamed pair. Otherwise they're far too easy to confuse with ...


3

Write the second half of the second bar as four eighth notes with a tie between the second and third eighth note. Can you see now how to play that rhythm in swing time?


3

It really ought to mention (or even make a big point of) using/not using open strings here. There is little point in playing open strings, for several reasons. The sound of an open string played in the middle of a phrase can sound different from the fretted notes, and often detracts from the fluidity. Using open strings confines the playing to that one key, ...


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