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11 votes

How can I turn a math function into sound?

Don't overcomplicate it. Let's start with an image of the AM album cover: Sure, it does look like it might be an audio waveform, but first note that the waveform has been artistically modified in the ...
Theodore's user avatar
  • 2,920
10 votes

In principle, is it possible to create the sound of an instrument from the waveform of a different instrument?

I don't exactly disagree, with Hoagie's answer, but fact is, that the original waveform is not of much help in case of such different instruments, where the waveforms exhibit no similiarity. You save ...
guidot's user avatar
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7 votes

In principle, is it possible to create the sound of an instrument from the waveform of a different instrument?

Sort of. The sustain portion of most instrument sounds has a relatively simple, regular waveform which can be manipulated to sound like another instrument. I wouldn't call this 'synthesis', that ...
Laurence's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

How can I turn a math function into sound?

You may find this tool useful. The Desmos graphing calculator has a "tone" function available now, albeit in beta-testing mode. I haven't played with it, but it may do what you are hoping....
nuggethead's user avatar
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6 votes

In principle, is it possible to create the sound of an instrument from the waveform of a different instrument?

I’m going to answer a qualified No You’d struggle to make the bass sound like a flute because while it does have a harmonic spectrum that could be filtered in some ways to be similar to a flute, it ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
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4 votes

How can I turn a math function into sound?

You could use a scripting language like Matlab (paid) or Octave (free) to write the function out and create a repeating time series. This will be accessible as a local array variable. Both of these ...
Dan Barry's user avatar
  • 141
4 votes

In principle, is it possible to create the sound of an instrument from the waveform of a different instrument?

What does make different instruments sound differently? How do you distinguish, say, a trumpet (sound) from a violin (sound)? There are two (three) things the ear relies on: volume, but it would be ...
bakunin's user avatar
  • 307
3 votes

Is anyone familiar with the instrument called the mellertion?

Grove Music Online: The ‘Mellertion’ described by Percy Scholes in the Oxford Companion to Music resulted from a misprint in a review (Musical Times, vol.72, 1931) of a demonstration of the Hellertion....
user98752's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

In principle, is it possible to create the sound of an instrument from the waveform of a different instrument?

By the Fourier theorem, every sound can be decomposed into a sum of pure sine waves. Finite duration or non-repeating sounds require summing an infinite number of sine wave to perfectly reconstruct, ...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
2 votes

How can I turn a math function into sound?

These are all good answers. In addition, some DAWs like LMMS 1.3 can synthesize functions with virtual instruments. For example, here is an Xpressive instrument in LMMS with an approximation to the ...
NullPointerException's user avatar
1 vote

Synthesizer: why playing a second time the same note shut down the first one?

There are certainly use-cases for overlapping notes in MIDI (as with pianos that have 3 strings per key to add more depth to the sound). And yes, there is no way for a synth to know which NoteOn is ...
TonyR's user avatar
  • 11

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