New answers tagged

1

The sync inputs of the various oscillator and LFO modules expect an audio signal or another signal that alternates between negative or zero and positive; when the signal changes to positive, the oscillator is retriggered. The easiest way to sync an oscillator to the MIDI clock is to use the Sync Clock module. Its output alternates between a value that you ...


8

Non pitched sounds are sounds which are not only composed of a fundamental frequency and a distribution of its harmonics. That's quite a strict definition of 'non-pitched'. Most sounds that are essentially perceived as pitched by humans nevertheless contain energy at frequencies that are not exactly at the multiples of a fundamental - possibly because the ...


5

I think you are confusing multiple concepts. As piiperi Reinstate Monica stated, the example you give would be 2 pitches rather than a non-pitched sound. The term non-pitched usually refers to percussion instruments, percussive sounds, scratching, and other "sounds" for which it is difficult to define a fundamental. I think you got that part ...


5

Simultaneous sine waves at 440 Hz and 500 Hz are some kind of a two-note chord, or an interval at least, something like a major second. It's definitely pitched, because there are two distinct constant pitches. If you cannot identify a pitch, then the sound is unpitched. I don't know if silence counts as a sound, even though there's a song about it, but at ...


2

There can't be a single answer. A traditional 1960s analog synth was monophonic : with only one oscillator, the second note must re-use it, therefore cutting the first note off - whether the second note had the same pitch or any other pitch. Polyphonic music using these instruments used multi-tracking on analog tape recorders, one note at a time (most ...


3

This is not an answer to your why question, but I can't leave this unmentioned. The, perhaps obvious, workaround for this limitation of MIDI is to use the same voice on more than one channel. I vaguely remember having done that in the past just for this very reason. It's far from ideal, however, and sometimes not even possible, especially with synths. Let's ...


15

The MIDI specification says: If an instrument receives two or more Note On messages with the same key number and MIDI channel, it must make a determination of how to handle the additional Note Ons. It is up to the receiver as to whether the same voice or another voice will be sounded, or if the messages will be ignored. The transmitter, however, must send a ...


5

Despite my comment, this answer does agree with you that the 'implicit note off' is common! The bottom line is that this is a question of instrument design - there isn't a clear standard or spec to follow as to what should happen when the same note is triggered twice without a note off in between. it is plausible that the synth could decide to assign ...


10

This is too long for a comment, so I'll make it an answer. Let's say you have a round-robin sample program that plays a different speech sample every time. You play this: NoteOn(1,40,100) // "one" NoteOn(1,40,100) // "two" NoteOn(1,40,100) // "three" NoteOn(1,40,100) // "four" NoteOn(1,40,100) // "five&...


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