47

Possibly putting the cat amongst the pigeons here. An expert (at anything, be it sport, art, science, etc.) is often not a good teacher. A good teacher knows the subject, of course, but maybe hasn't the propensity to perform as well as an expert. Often, when someone is naturally good at something, they will lack the empathy to understand why the students ...


20

It sounds to me like you are using the metronome in an effective manner. Your teacher might have been concerned that you, as a young student, would have seen playing in perfect time as an artistic objective. Of course it is rarely such. The musical artist is expressing emotion and other aesthetic insights. Variety of all kinds should be deployed for that ...


17

For starters, merely being a good or great musician is nowhere near enough to be a successful teacher. Neither is having qualifications and certificates. Those downvoting - please tell your valid reasons! Having knowledge is one thing. Having the propensity to pass that knowledge on to others is far more important for teaching. So, no.1 - being able to ...


11

I think I can understand what your teacher was trying to say. He wanted to make you feel the music. Music needs to breathe. If a computer and a human play the same song, it will sound different; the human version will be more natural; the computer version will be more mathematically correct. Your teacher might be worried that if you kept practicing with a ...


11

Don't ask for it. Others have already pointed that the teacher's mechanical abilities have almost nothing to do with his pedagogical abilities. One more point that I would like to add - if you can't play the instrument, can you judge the musicians abilities? I don't know about you, but most people can't. I am a guitar player and can play a bit of keyboards ...


9

I actually had a piano teacher politely ask me if I was sure I wanted to keep going, as I wasn't really that interested in playing, but sort of went (I was about 10 years old). I regret that, as a few years later I picked up the guitar and loved it. I think the thing was, I was playing stuff I just couldn't relate to - at all. 'Oh when the saints go ...


9

A few things you should consider when starting out. Decide what kind of teacher you want to be A professor of music at a college once told someone close to me that he always finds it amazing when he sees a teacher, teaching young children. He says that even though he did go to Julliard, it was something he was never taught. Just as this professor decided ...


8

All teachers bring something to the student that the student cannot get online: experienced observation and training catered to both the strengths and weaknesses particular to the student. Everyone is different. Everyone's bodies and brains work in subtly or seriously different ways. But drums (and guitars and math and Shakespeare) are all pretty much the ...


7

While it is possible that your metronome banning teacher was just a bad teacher (Such a thing is clearly possible), because as a rule metronomes are good, I often save metronome work for intermediate and advanced students. This is primarily because in the beginning it can be frustrating to achieve music on an instrument. Metronome work can compound that ...


5

The question should not be "is this teacher known?" The question should be "Is this teacher effective?" Plenty of "unknown" teachers are quite capable of helping you make faster progress than you could make on your own. Needless to say, you probably are better off learning on your own than learning from a bad teacher. Unfortunately there are a few of them ...


5

It appears as though you have stumbled into the fact that different teachers are appropriate for different levels of skill. Some teachers are fantastic for providing a strong foundation, but aren't able / interesting in wading into the loftier aspirations of their pursuit. Others are perfect for experimenting and for reaching far into the unknown, but are ...


5

The only string teaching that remains, as far as I know, is online. I know quite a few violin teachers who were teaching online before and who are continuing but a lot of regular face-to-face teachers have installed Zoom are offering their former face-to-face students online tuition. If you are keen to continue with tuition I would suggest you make ...


4

Being a great player doesn't always equate with being a great teacher. World champions have coaches; if the coach was that good, why isn't he the world champion? Often a good player is naturally gifted, and finds things so easy that he can't understand why his pupils struggle. Empathy is something a teacher needs. Being on the same wavelength as his pupil ...


4

Life's too short for such nonsense. You aren't enjoying the situation and they probably aren't feeling too good about maintaining the charade either. Kids are often much better at 'being diplomatic' and telling people what they want to hear than adults are. Or maybe it's true that they are serous about music, but piano isn't their thing - it was never mine, ...


4

More practice certainly isn't going to hurt you (as long as you're practicing well, as opposed to practicing "bad habits" a teacher might correct). Since it sounds like an in-person teacher isn't an option at present, consider one of the many on-line resources available: from instructional YouTube videos, to teachers who offer online lessons. If ...


3

You do not want to ask the teacher to perform for you at your lesson. As a teacher my answer to that request is "if you would like to hear me perform I would be happy to let you know of upcoming performances in which I will be playing!" I send out a newsletter so students have plenty of opportunity to hear me play if they desire to do that. While I agree ...


3

Accomplished musician does not always make an accomplished teacher. Pavarotti was a great singer, but I would not have brought my child within a mile radius of him. Domingo on the other hand, he would be a great teacher of children. There is more to a good teacher than just the mere mastery of the subject matter, (That is important, though.) to me the ...


3

If it is possible, go to own of his/hers concerts. Most musicians (despite their musical style) play concerts. So, try to find out if the teacher you are interested in is playing a gig any day now and go and watch for yourself. Try to find others students of his, and ask them. This is more important to me, because a good musician doesn't equal a good ...


3

Probably 95% of students who take lessons don't end up performing professionally. Music will be something they do for themselves and their friends, and good accompanists are rare in many areas. If she wants to be able to sing with an accompanist with any frequency, her options are to marry one (my wife's choice) or be able to accompany herself. Of course ...


3

See this section of a Wikipedia article criticism of metronome use Here is a brief excerpt: "[...] using the metronome as a constant guide to ramp up the speed or to keep the rhythm. This is one of the worst abuses of the metronome. [...] If over used, it can lead to loss of your internal rhythm, loss of musicality, and bio-physical difficulties ...


3

Should I continue with both teachers? No. I think you should ditch the classical guitar guy. ...he said that if I want to be a good Jazz guitarist, I should first build a solid foundation in classical guitar. Which is really saying "I neither know, nor like the music that is your passion. Therefore I will recommend you learn the music that I like and ...


3

First, and most importantly, identify what your goals are. What genres do you want to play? Do you want to play solo? Do you want to join a band? Do you want to be able to pass exams? Anything else you'd like to accomplish with your playing? Talk to prospective teachers about all of these things, and ask about their history: If you want to play in a ...


3

This is a very broad question, and entire books are available on the subject. This answer will focus on considerations of starting a music teaching business, and I'll be re-iterating some excellent points from the other answers. Some of my points may be specific to the United States. There are a number of opportunities for teaching music. Some of these ...


3

It's been said many times, and I believe it to be true, but teaching something makes you improve very well. It's certainly worked for me. So, if you have the patience and facility required, you could start teaching drumming (and percussion) yourself. Obviously at a low level initially. You are already experienced, but to what degree and in what styles, we ...


2

You seemed to have answered your own question. My past experience has taught me to avoid people just out of college, but even among the experienced teachers, there is a huge range of abilities, both in skill in music and in teaching. Hard to argue against such an open minded statement. Yes, some inexperienced teachers are bad. Some are good. Some are ...


2

My past experience has taught me to avoid people just out of college, but even among the experienced teachers, there is a huge range of abilities, both in skill in music and in teaching. Why exactly? What sorts of questions should I ask a prospective teacher? What are some warning signs I should look to avoid? What are some signs that someone is ...


2

How do I tell my old teacher about the new teacher? "Teacher 1, I wanted to let you know. I've been getting a tremendous lot out of studying with you. I really like how you're supporting my goals in jazz. Recently, I've been convinced that I would be better able to realize my ambitions with some more formal pedagogy and drill. But since I don't want to ...


2

One aspect of this that I don't think has been addressed (unless I missed it in the other answers!) is that, in my opinion, teachers should protect themselves from being "blamed" for lack of student progress in these cases. If one teaches kids as a business, it's only a matter of time before one comes across a parent that says some version of, "What am I ...


2

Congratulations on your decision to learn to play guitar. The guitar is a versatile instrument capable of providing musical accompaniment in almost any style of music imaginable. Playing the guitar will provide untold hours of enjoyment for a lifetime. But as you have probably figured out by now, it's not exactly the most intuitive and easy instrument to ...


2

If you want to go to one of their concerts that's probably a good idea. Most musicians have a youtube channel or soundcloud or something, so this really shouldn't be that hard. If I were asked by a potential student to play for them so that I could "prove my worth", honestly I'd probably be pretty offended. I would do it, but I would find it to be ...


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