46

You added a different flavor of this question in the comments: i think the spirit of my question was, has anyone found that using newer styles or technology for reading music advanced their students own their own learning for the piano[?] My answer is yes, but perhaps in a different way from what you are thinking. I took piano lessons back in the early ...


34

There are a few reasons that I found these technical drills helpful as a piano player: They help practice playing the hands together clearly and cleanly. Young piano players often play both hands "together," but the articulations between the hands are not actually in sync. As such, the result is one of constant flam and grace-note relationships between the ...


33

A major disadvantage is that you can't jam together because of the delay. You can explain and show things clearly, no problem, but playing together is impossible. The obvious advantage is that you can reach students around the world. The question is just if potential students around the world will be able to find you instead of many thousand other teachers ...


31

There was a trick for these that I used all the time based on what the rests look like. The whole rest looks like a hole. The words sound the same so it's a good way to equate them. The half rest looks like a hat and since hat and half both start with the letter 'h' they go together. I like this trick a lot because it associates the rests more with ...


27

Heinrich Schenker was born in 1868 and died in 1935. And unfortunately, it's probably something of a blessing that he died when he did: as a Jew living in Austria in the 1930s, he only just missed the annexation of Austria (1938) and the subsequent horrors that that brought. Schenker's wife, for instance, died in Theresienstadt (a "hybrid concentration ...


27

Using sheet music is like reading Latin, converting it to English in your head, then playing English on the piano. Well, you probably never really translated Latin, at least not in a good way. Despite its naming, music notation is not just about notes. As much as writing is not just about words. I was able to memorize and learn the proper fingering for ...


26

As a beginner, you can't expect to get a piece sounding 'perfect' in any reasonable length of time, because you haven't yet built up all the skills - intonation, bow control, phrasing, your own style - that will make a piece sound like a well-played violin piece. The best way to build up those general skills isn't to play the same piece over and over again, ...


22

In elementary school, I was taught to think of the rest like a raft in water. Since a half rest gets two beats, it's like a raft carrying two people - light enough to float on top of the water: The whole rest, on the other hand, gets four beats (in common time, anyway) and so it's like a raft carrying four people - enough weight such that it sinks down ...


21

Edit - Now this is the top answer, I'll quickly answer the question, which is yes, you certainly can! But please read on... I'd like to put forward a caveat - even if your teacher is willing, this may not be your only concern. It sounds like you might be interested in learning a very different skill. Let me explain through a quick personal interlude. I was ...


20

It sounds to me like you are using the metronome in an effective manner. Your teacher might have been concerned that you, as a young student, would have seen playing in perfect time as an artistic objective. Of course it is rarely such. The musical artist is expressing emotion and other aesthetic insights. Variety of all kinds should be deployed for that ...


19

Advantages are things like: You can teach people around the world, from all countries as long as they speak your language. You save time... Neither you nor your student have to drive around with all the instruments to get to each other. Additionally, if someone cancels the session, you could just put someone else in between without any troubles. If you ...


19

Besides the copyist mentioned in the other answer, students could simply write on their own! No need to have someone copy it for them. Also it was not uncommon for teachers to write stuff down for their students. I have had teachers that give handwritten scores (or copies of them) and notes to their students. This still is a way that is pretty cheap ...


18

I understand that anxiety can cause a kid to freak out a little and start "flopping" the fingers, but I won't allow it to continue. I stop them and maybe do one measure at a time, or even one note to the next note. I will ask them again to tell me the note names and the fingering if applicable, and have them play one note at a time. If they had been ...


17

A whole-note (semibreve) rest hangs D-O-W-N from the line (four letters, so four beats). A half-note rest points U-P from the line (two letters, so two beats).


17

For starters, merely being a good or great musician is nowhere near enough to be a successful teacher. Neither is having qualifications and certificates. Those downvoting - please tell your valid reasons! Having knowledge is one thing. Having the propensity to pass that knowledge on to others is far more important for teaching. So, no.1 - being able to ...


16

"Historical accident" is one way to describe it. Historical oversight might be another. The fact is we have never symbolically indicated the tonic in written music. D Dorian looks just like G Mixolydian - and after we discovered that there were notes between the letter named pitches and created key signatures, G Dorian looked just like C Mixolydian. A ...


16

Every musician knows that sheet music can be frustrating at first, but almost everyone has spent quite some time learning it. I've met literally dozens of people (students, fellow musicians etc) that have asked the exact same question: "Why isn't there a simpler way of notating music? Ableton's piano roll works for me! Synthesia works for me!" ...


15

Teach students how to make music that they like. While experienced musicians are often very broad-minded, seeing value and beauty in many kinds of music, younger kids are often primarily interested in finding out about the things they like. Can you convincingly explain the structures of the songs in the charts/clubs/on your students' phones now? Could you ...


15

As a teacher, and, most importantly, "former" pupil, I'd say this: you will probably never get to the 100%. Not even close. Many professional and acclaimed musicians wouldn't say that they got their "one hundred percent" on anything. Ever. A known quote by Pablo Casals, considered one of the greatest cellists of all time, was the answer ...


15

Theoretically yes. Most probably, no. As with many other things, a teacher is not absolutely fundamental, but a professional guidance ensures that: you follow an appropriate didactic path tailored on you, your needs and capabilities, focusing on improving your gaps and enhancing your strengths; you don't lose time with unnecessary or even wrong suggestions ...


14

Is the parent actively discouraging their child? Or is the parent simply a busy person who doesn't care one way or another about whether their child plays violin or does any of a dozen other activities? Because they're presumably paying for lessons, which implies a level of active support. And is the child actually both invested in playing and unable to ...


13

You are missing independent coordination between your limbs. Your brain has not yet developed neurological connections that supports such kinesthetic interdependence as it is something that takes time to do - some of us longer than others. In order to develop strict and evenly developed competence with all of your limbs, it therefore stands to reason that ...


13

...An analogy I've considered for years is this: Using sheet music is like reading Latin, converting it to English in your head, then playing English on the piano. Using videos like the one I posted is like reading English and playing English, and you also get to see which fingers to use... This just sounds like a rant and resistance to learning to read ...


12

Some ideas which may help her play and practice: If she's not a larger than average ten-year-old, then I hope she has a smaller than normal guitar. If not, then a smaller size guitar may make it easier for her to learn and play. Electric guitars are usually strung with lighter strings and are easier to get started on, as long as she likes the sound. Let her ...


12

A few bad things Guess what? The person who played on that video that had to get it from somewhere. From where? From the sheet music of course! Those videos are for keyboards where all the notes are laid out in a row. Let's see how it works for a clarinet or violin! If pianists are the only ones who don't play from sheet music, how will they ever play with ...


11

I’m a player, not a teacher, but the topic of how to teach young children comes up fairly often on the discussion boards at www.violinist.com. I’d suggest searching for ‘Teaching young children’, and ‘5 year old’. Some of the high points that come up repeatedly: Don’t expect the child to concentrate for more than 5-15 minutes. Some kids will be on the low ...


11

I would say personally that it's mostly a matter of the music being taught. The main exception to that is voice; all you have to do is listen to, say, Pavarotti and Frank Sinatra to tell the difference. They are obviously each going after a very different sound. Operatic singing doesn't use a microphone and emphasizes natural volume. The sound is ...


11

I think I can understand what your teacher was trying to say. He wanted to make you feel the music. Music needs to breathe. If a computer and a human play the same song, it will sound different; the human version will be more natural; the computer version will be more mathematically correct. Your teacher might be worried that if you kept practicing with a ...


11

Is this just a historical accident? Yes. Everything about music notation is a historic artifact! When you go back a very long time - into the Middle Ages - there weren't key signatures and the tonic was called the final which was literally the last note. Interestingly the system of notation also did not indicate absolute pitch, the singers sang at ...


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