46

You added a different flavor of this question in the comments: i think the spirit of my question was, has anyone found that using newer styles or technology for reading music advanced their students own their own learning for the piano[?] My answer is yes, but perhaps in a different way from what you are thinking. I took piano lessons back in the early ...


27

Using sheet music is like reading Latin, converting it to English in your head, then playing English on the piano. Well, you probably never really translated Latin, at least not in a good way. Despite its naming, music notation is not just about notes. As much as writing is not just about words. I was able to memorize and learn the proper fingering for ...


26

As a beginner, you can't expect to get a piece sounding 'perfect' in any reasonable length of time, because you haven't yet built up all the skills - intonation, bow control, phrasing, your own style - that will make a piece sound like a well-played violin piece. The best way to build up those general skills isn't to play the same piece over and over again, ...


16

Every musician knows that sheet music can be frustrating at first, but almost everyone has spent quite some time learning it. I've met literally dozens of people (students, fellow musicians etc) that have asked the exact same question: "Why isn't there a simpler way of notating music? Ableton's piano roll works for me! Synthesia works for me!" ...


15

As a teacher, and, most importantly, "former" pupil, I'd say this: you will probably never get to the 100%. Not even close. Many professional and acclaimed musicians wouldn't say that they got their "one hundred percent" on anything. Ever. A known quote by Pablo Casals, considered one of the greatest cellists of all time, was the answer ...


15

Theoretically yes. Most probably, no. As with many other things, a teacher is not absolutely fundamental, but a professional guidance ensures that: you follow an appropriate didactic path tailored on you, your needs and capabilities, focusing on improving your gaps and enhancing your strengths; you don't lose time with unnecessary or even wrong suggestions ...


14

Is the parent actively discouraging their child? Or is the parent simply a busy person who doesn't care one way or another about whether their child plays violin or does any of a dozen other activities? Because they're presumably paying for lessons, which implies a level of active support. And is the child actually both invested in playing and unable to ...


13

...An analogy I've considered for years is this: Using sheet music is like reading Latin, converting it to English in your head, then playing English on the piano. Using videos like the one I posted is like reading English and playing English, and you also get to see which fingers to use... This just sounds like a rant and resistance to learning to read ...


12

A few bad things Guess what? The person who played on that video that had to get it from somewhere. From where? From the sheet music of course! Those videos are for keyboards where all the notes are laid out in a row. Let's see how it works for a clarinet or violin! If pianists are the only ones who don't play from sheet music, how will they ever play with ...


9

I would say no. Generally music teachers try to give students a window into the entire repertoire of piano literature. Not all of this has been translated into new formats. Likewise, one learns to improvise, play from orchestral scores, play from choral (and chorale) scores from the 1400s to the 2100s, etc. Again, these are not now (and not necessarily ever)...


8

Have to say that most, if not all of the singers I've played and worked with over the years (including myself) had no formal training at all - and some were extremely good. Main reason - there were maybe some teachers available, but certainly nothing on the net (no net, even!). And, just because it's on the net doesn't mean it's any good, be well aware of ...


7

Forgetting the instrument If you have an instrument the student can use during lessons, then that's probably your best solution. But understanding this may not be possible, then your next option is to practice things that don't require the instrument: music theory (at a keyboard if available), sight singing, listening (to expand repertoire and general ...


6

Once she covers approximately 80% of a piece, we would move on. But I don't find that I’m playing the best that I can yet (eg when I listen to youtube covers of the pieces, and then compare to my own recordings) I'm a year ahead of you (been learning for almost 2 years now) and my teacher is the same. Here's the thing. I love going back (particularly in ...


5

Obviously not an ideal learning situation, but how often is the learning situation actually ideal? None of us know which interested or uninterested person will prevail in the end, but as long as the interested person receives support and validation of their interest from others, chances are better that they will make progress in pursuit of their interest. ...


4

Many of the above answers have well specified the necessity of sheet music. In simple terms, I would put it this way: Through notations, unlike in synthesia videos where the note length, crescendos, diminuendos, and ritardandos I.e. increasing the intensity of sound, decreasing intensity of sound, slowing down, and so many other notations are not available, ...


4

One thing that you might find if you asked your teacher this same question is that they tell you what our teacher tells my son. (I'm learning along with, at his pace, with occasional lessons for me.) She tells us that we learn the piece the first time for the purpose of learning the technique which the piece exists to teach. Particularly in book 1, Suzuki ...


3

One thing I can say is this-- music theory books are a distillation of actual pieces of music, in this case largely Bach's. Someone's done a lot of the analysis, and packaged it in bite-sized chunks for the consuming student. You should always understand this, and go between theory and actual music-- look for your own examples of certain rules. Try ...


3

Realistically? Nothing. Take the money as long as they want to keep paying. Then move on. But are you sure you're getting the full information? Children come up with very ingenious justifications for lack of practice.


2

I'm not sure these are really the methods you're after, but they seem to be really important for piano: CPE Bach, Essay on the True Art of Playing Keyboard Instruments Cortot, Rational Principles of Piano Technique According to the introduction to the Bach Essay it was called by Haydn "the school of all schools." The Cortot was recommended to me ...


2

Here's a simplistic answer. Babies first learn to speak by imitating. In some societies, this all that is ever needed. No knowledge of reading, writing or grammar is required. Kids brought up in a musical family, absorb music in the same way. For kids who are not so lucky, any and all online music resources are a boon. Most children learn to read and write. ...


1

Yes, it is absolutely possible to learn effectively via telepresence (Zoom, FaceTime, Skype, etc.). Yes, it's not as efficient or easy as learning in person, but it's much more effective than trying to learn without a teacher. Often, we get the question "Can I teach myself ___ without a teacher?" and the answer is often "Hm, I don't know, ...


1

CVT is sort of a commercial product, and you can learn about it on the internet. There is even a phone app explaining various parts of the method. On the other hand the teachers have their own background and experience, and possibly only at some point of their career got involved in learning and getting certified in given method. The details of how they ...


1

Yes it is possible. I did it myself. I sing properly in the sense that I can sing a variety of relatively difficult music (opera, jazz, american songbook,world music) without injuring my voice, I produce sounds that I enjoy making and that other people like to hear. I am not a professional singer, and I don't think you could be a successful professional ...


1

Several points occur with this concept. It's basically learning by rote. When a parrot asks 'Who's a pretty boy then?' it obviously can say it, but hasn't a clue what it means (for most parrots, that is...) and learning a piece this way only gives you that piece - no more. Nothing to help learn the next piece, nothing to build on. In the long term, quite ...


1

Since your last edit, your question went from: Should piano teachers move away from sheet music and sight reading and instead use new simpler music-reading methods To: Should sight-reading be emphasized less for piano instruction with new developments in technology I can't give you an answer for the first one, but I can give you my point of view for the ...


1

I studied Suzuki violin as a child, and my oldest child is studying it now. Violin is one of the most difficult of all instruments on which to reach a basic level of proficiency. A beginner on piano or guitar can be very listenable. It takes most people multiple years of study to be even bearable on a violin, because minor mistakes with either the bow or the ...


1

I echo the other answers that discuss how each new piece introduces a new skill or technique to be mastered. New notes, bowings, fingerings... You mention one of your weakness is intonation: One of my major weakness in playing is intonation because I have zero background in music and therefore still struggle to play in tune. For this, I recommend ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible