24

Lots of classical music require retuning of timpani (or purchasing a larger drum set). Von Biber's Rosary Sonatas require retuning a violin between each section.


21

In "The Rite of Spring" Stravinsky requires the celli to detune their A-strings to G-sharp for the final chord of the piece (and asks them to play a four-note chord "non arpeggiato"!): Similarly at the end of Jörg Widmann's Viola Concerto the soloist has to detune the C-string over several measures:


15

Theoretically yes. Most probably, no. As with many other things, a teacher is not absolutely fundamental, but a professional guidance ensures that: you follow an appropriate didactic path tailored on you, your needs and capabilities, focusing on improving your gaps and enhancing your strengths; you don't lose time with unnecessary or even wrong suggestions ...


13

I think you might be exaggerating a bit. For example, flat picking and finger picking I think are both learned by any competent player. I think a lot of guitar players at least try to develop familiarity with a lot of techniques and types of guitars. But I agree there is sure to be genre specialization. If you don't like metal, it's hard to imagine someone ...


12

In relation to the violin (or other string instrument) the specific technique described — using the tuning peg to detune and retune a pitch — is called peg scordatura (also peg glissando and glissando scordatura). A very clear example of this occurs in Alfred Schnittke's Stille Nacht (1978) for violin and piano. At the end of the piece, the violin detunes ...


8

Banjo is commonly played in several different tunings. Some banjos are fitted with cam tuners (known as D tuners, Scruggs tuners or Keith tuners) which facilitate fast, accurate retuning between two fixed notes, and which are also used to good effect during playing. Here's an except from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beacon_Banjo_Company explaining the ...


8

Have to say that most, if not all of the singers I've played and worked with over the years (including myself) had no formal training at all - and some were extremely good. Main reason - there were maybe some teachers available, but certainly nothing on the net (no net, even!). And, just because it's on the net doesn't mean it's any good, be well aware of ...


7

I would say a true professional will NOT specialize in a given technique. But your perception of technique might be a bit off. Classical guitar and electric guitar are completely different instruments. "Finger style" electric picking will not produce the same quality of tone as one a classical. You need to get used to the physics of the ...


7

The existing answers are all good - to add something else to the mix though: For a particularly extreme example, Michael Manring the experimental bass guitarist enjoyed the expressive possibilities of retuning mid performance so much that he had an instrument purpose built to allow him to retune quickly on the fly. This eventually has extended to whole ...


6

Unless I am mistaken, no one has mentioned the Schumann Piano Quartet where the cellist is asked to tune the C string down to a Bb at the end of the slow movement, in order to hold a long pedal point.


5

Those are intended as two separated voices, and it's common for keyboard instruments (but not only) to have to play "again" a note that is theoretically still playing in another, and that's also for historical reasons: it was common to have a keyboard instrument with more than one keyboard. Consider this excerpt from the second Praeludium of the ...


5

There might be some statistical effects related to which guitarists you see the most. There's saying that it's better to know to do 1 thing best on the world than to know to do 100 things. Is it true? Hard to say. However if you look at famous artists, many of which started as amateurs without formal education, they often became famous for doing their "...


4

The important moment in understanding how to play this comes at the beginning of the chord(s). The below screenshot comes from the 0:43 second mark of the linked video in the OP. Note how the left hand first plays the B octave, then plays the [F# B D] chord. To do this, play the Bs first, and hold them with the sustain pedal, which is then kept held while ...


3

Not exactly "retuning," but lots of orchestral music has the clarinets swap between the Bb and A axe. If one is playing all the Bach unaccompanied cello suites, one must detune for the 5th suite (A-string tuned down to G). That doesn't really count as "mid-piece." Now, do you count using a capo on the guitar family? Or changing settings ...


2

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Nigel Tufnel's performance where he retuned the violin he was using to play his guitar with. It's quite clear from the video that the solo really wouldn't have been the same without the retune.


2

Somewhere there's Haydn symphony where the violins are asked to retune the G string to (I think) F and then play the open string while tuning it back up to G. But I can't remember which one and I don't have the scores or time to search IMSLP. Walton in 'Facade' asks the cello to retune the C string to B, and then notates it as a transposing instrument. I ...


2

I’m a pretty new pianist, on grade 6. But I think for glissandos, use the nails of your finger. R.h. Down: finger 1, thumb’s nail. Don’t clench your fist up. L.h. Down: number 3’s nail, and prehaps number 4’s. R.h. Up: same as l.h down. L.h. Up: same as r.h down A piece I’m doing also has gliss in it, and I tend to use right hand thumb nail for the down. It ...


2

There is a fingering where the thumb repeats but fingers 5 and 4 are used depending on black or white key... ...from Knott, Scale and Arpeggio Manual part 3. If the reason for this fingering isn't clear, put your hand in a wide span like you are playing an octave with fingers 1 and 5, then put finger 4 next to 5, and you should see that 4 can reach in a bit ...


2

The pedal should be both released and re-engaged in the moment after you play beat 1: Play note + quickly release and re-engage pedal. Releasing before, or even on, beat 1 will leave a gap of silence that interrupts the melody.


2

There's a song in the musical Batboy that does this. I'm forgetting a lot of the details (esp. the name of the song), but I think it was done to shift the range of the vocal melody and/or as a phrase modulation for musical interest. It just coincidentally inconvenienced the guitar player. Most of the song could be played in standard tuning except for the ...


2

I would agree with musicamante's answer that in theory you can learn anything without a teacher. But there are risks. Even the best made videos cannot provide feedback or answer questions. Singing relies on you developing correct support and resonance. While it is possible to get this from hearing someone explain what is happening on a video all of this ...


1

I have been playing the guitar for about 10 years, and in my experience, it's a mix of a lot of things. Keep in mind that I have had little formal training, so my learning experience has been basically along the lines of "Hey, this sounds cool, lemme see if I can do it". Learning it this way, I've noticed that there are some things that I just don'...


1

Reflects the rest of life in some ways. If one either finds they're good at something, or particularly likes something, one will pursue that something more than other things. Learning the guitar from scratch, one learns certain common techniques, for want of a better word. One happens to like, or be good at, some more than others. So one continues with those ...


1

Yes it is possible. I did it myself. I sing properly in the sense that I can sing a variety of relatively difficult music (opera, jazz, american songbook,world music) without injuring my voice, I produce sounds that I enjoy making and that other people like to hear. I am not a professional singer, and I don't think you could be a successful professional ...


1

I was taught to play the first bar with my left hand and to think of the piece as both hands having a conversation with one another as one hand plays the theme and the other continues it. P.S. I played this piece competitively when I was in middle school and have been looking for the name and sheet music ever since. I only remember by muscle memory but haven'...


1

I play acoustic guitars and electric guitars and have played for 7 years. I had to learn to play with only 3 fingers which are my pointer middle and ring finger. I had an incident where I had broken my hand and I destroyed the tendon in my pinky so I can no longer straighten it and I have no strength in so I figured out how to do fingering and I learned how ...


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