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8

This line refers to the pedal: You are holding the pedal down before, at the triangle you release it and hold it down again for this bar. So, you can use the pedal to hold down the notes you cannot stretch your fingers for.


7

There is sometimes a middle pedal on pianos, called the sostenuto pedal. Its role is to hold only the notes played when it's operated. so here, using that sostenuto pedal, the three semibreves can be held with it, which doesn't affect the other notes. Using the sustain pedal, found on all pianos, will obviously hold the long notes without having to hold ...


5

The most straightforward way to play this would be to do a whole-tone bend on the B-string at the 16th fret, and then play the E-string at the same fret during the bend. You can use up to three fingers to do the bend, and the bending motion actually moves the fingers out of the way for your little finger to fret the E-string, so it's quite easy to play it ...


4

People do strange things to the 'Moonlight'. My feeling is that the unifying element is the constant triplets which, while a degree of flexibility is always allowable, should not have their flow BROKEN. Many performers disagree! This version, the first that Google threw up for me, hesitates after each of the dotted quaver-semiquaver pairs. ...


4

Even if you want to learn by yourself, or can't afford tuition, it's a good idea to take even just a single 1-hour lesson once in a while, just to get some feedback on your technique. If that's not at all possible, then closely examine how the online tutor plays the chords, and try to mimic it exactly, even if it feels more difficult than the technique ...


3

***** DISCLAIMER ***** I am not a doctor and this response in not meant to be medical advice. See a doctor if it does not clear up. My 2 cents: Having played guitar for ~45 years and having had some issues with various hand injuries I would say that the specific feeling in the middle finger knuckle you are describing reminds my of a pinched nerve. I get ...


3

Don't count too much. Make music! let it flow: The quietest it would sound if you give the 16th note half the value of a triplet eighth. But of course that's not mathematically correct. The exact note value would be 4/12 resp. 3/12t: The triplets each with 4/12 The dotted eighths with 9/12 The 16th with 3/12 So mathematically correct would be, if the ...


3

This is part of the classical technique. The resonances of the other open strings help produce a full sound, see Carcassi's text. It is supposed to be there. The strings that resonate will have the plucked note as a natural harmonic so it should not be dissonant. However you do need to gently mute when moving from one chord to another and you will get ...


2

All said and done, a drummer should be able to lead with either hand. Rolling across toms, for instance, on a r.h. kit, is far easier for a r.h. drummer - or one who can lead with r.h. Vice versa for l.h. of course. The open/close is a different situation. If you are never going to play on another kit (probably r.h.) then there's no problem setting up l.h. ...


1

Maybe you are crossing your thumb under the palm and uncurling it is hindering timing? Maybe you are twisting your wrist in ulnar deviation which will create an uneven sound. Try this: Don't abduct (stretch out) your fingers but instead, as you ascend move your arm up the keyboard so that the arm places the hand and next finger. Also, since your fingers ...


1

You found a solution, not, maybe, the solution.Can't really see what his elbow is doing, but it could be nudging to the right on the way up, in order to get that thumb underneath the palm ready for the next C. I prefer students to move the whole hand during and after playing the G with middle finger,, so the thumb is ready to play the next note, C. His ...


1

Other answers have made a good case for the common interpretation. I have always thought that the ideal should approximate two independent voices played by different people. That can be particularly difficult for a player of "amateur abilities," but I encourage you not to give up. I despaired of ever being able to achieve that, but with some practice (...


1

It depends on the situation. Often the arpeggio feels like grace notes preceding the top note which is played on the beat. Sometimes the bottom note is harmonically more important, so it's the one that's on the beat, followed by the higher ones. Brahms sometimes writes downward arpeggios as grace notes leading to an on-the-beat melody note. Sometimes it'...


1

For this subject, please allow me to be direct and to the point. I've played for over 35 years. I don't care if you're playing a snare or a 10 pc. kit. Call yourself a drummer or percussionist. Whatever! You learn traditional and you learn matched. That is the answer. No ifs. Ands. Buts. Nothin. We don't play strings. We don't blow into anything. This is a ...


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