13

I'm not a harp player, but it appears that this is done with the harp equivalent of prepared piano on a few strings. About four or five strings of the harp appear to have some kind of putty attached to them: At least one of the strings in the higher range is "prepared" in the same way. This would certainly affect the timbre and resonance of the ...


6

When it comes to fingering questions, the broader the question the more the answer will be: "it depends." That is probably why you find conflicting information online, too many answers that don't provide the specific context for one fingering approach versus another. You can say that generally your fingers get placed about mid-way along the length ...


6

Answer is - it depends!. Since our fingers aren't all the same length, each will press down its individual note at a different point anyway. Thumb, being a couple of inches less reach than the middle finger, will usually press near the end of the key nearest to the player, while middle will generally press close to the black keys' ends. But - there are going ...


4

This clearly is a question that does not make sense answering without the context of actual piece, general fingering method employed, and actual mapping of the passage to fingers. As a general rule, contortions and unnecessary strains are to be avoided, and that gives advantage to certain fingering patterns for typical melodic fragments, and for various ...


4

Without knowing that particular model, I'd guess you probably need "full volume" to properly match an acoustic. If you ever try actually accompanying people live in a 'gig' situation, you will quickly discover a digital piano just cannot reach the levels you can with an acoustic, without further amplification. Pianos are pretty loud. That doesn't ...


3

I'd say these are mordents, since they start and return to the same note. The audio example is closest to the first group in the picture. However, jazz has so many quick patterns that it might just be better to call them grace notes:


3

One of the terms is "lower neighbor." This is a bit more general than terms as the lower neighbor need not be just an ornament. It's a non-chord tone played (usually a half-step) below the main tone. A mordent is the main note, a neighbor (upper or lower), and the main note again. ("Mordent" is used for one and "inverted mordent"...


3

The "hammer-ons" technique causes vibrations on the string, due to the physics involved in striking it. This means that the string vibrates in both parts: the part that goes from the bridge up to your finger, and that that goes from your finger to the end of the neck. What happens in your case is that you're listening to both vibrations. The ...


2

The classical term is "mordents" but jazz musicians usually call these embellishments "turns". Often the higher note, is a semitone higher than the main, and the following note one step lower, but there are other possible constellations.


2

For electronic instruments you get what is modeled. If it's available, it's available. If not, you can try with some pedals/effects in the signal way. For a real acoustic piano, there may be a very subtle effect by doing "vibrato" on the key strongly sideways. It's not exactly a vibrato (namely a periodic pitch change) but a change in the ...


2

As has been pointed out you are hearing the vibrations created in both segments of the string and they will not be in tune in general. However on an electric the dissonant part will not be amplified since there is no pickup under that part of the string. Even on an acoustis guitar the dissonant part is not going to be picked up in the vibration of the ...


1

Two questions here. 1. Why does my guitar do this? 2. How can I fix the disonnance? As music amante states, a hammered string sounds on both sides - the note played between fret and nut being s a lot quieter, but still audible on acoustic guitar, and hardly picked up on an electric. A scrunchie on the strings around fret 1 or 2 will solve the problem. If ...


1

You can pretty well taught yourself, depends on determination, talent, love for music and your instrument, ... my boyfriend is self-taught piano player, and because of his late discovered enormous talent, he is progressing a lot faster than anybody I know from music school. First thing important is to make sure your wrist and lower hand are aligned or ...


1

I am also a self-taught alto sax player and agree with the above. I had to hold my saxophone further away from my chest. By loosening the neck strap a bit, I could hold less of the mouthpiece between my lips and play more quietly. In my case, it wasn't about the strength of the reed, but only about the neck strap


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