4

The following suggestion is based on my experience developing a software course called Guitar Speed Trainer and on countless conversations with users of that course. Of course the guitar has a whole different set of issues than the piano, but I think that some of the general principles are valid for all instruments, and I hope this will help you at least a ...


4

Some pretty straightforward advice: The point of practicing slow is to break the song down and see what mistakes you make. Playing a fast piece might not help you understand why you make mistakes. When you play the same piece slowly, see in which parts you make the mistakes, see why you are making the mistakes and practice those until you fix them and can ...


3

You are doing something wrong. Practice makes sense when - after each failure - you understand its reason and try to adjust - work to make the specific fix. Your problem might be caused by gazillion things: wrong arm position, wrong hand position, wrong fingering, focusing on the wrong thing altogether (sometimes problems in left hand can manifest as ...


3

If this is your first piece you play, it probably is too hard for you. Even if it is not the first one, but you are learning playing piano for less than 3 years, it could still be too hard. But if you really like it you can keep trying to play it to keep high your mood, but do not expect too much. In any case, remember: you cannot become good at playing a ...


3

After following the comments and answers, and after seeing your practice video, I'm giving this answer. Q: How to practice for speed and consistency? A: By practicing speed and consistency ONLY. Forget about this song's busy piano arrangement, it is beyond your current abilities. Practice speed and consistency on much simpler songs and exercises. You must ...


2

My recommendation is three-fold: Practice and memorize the major and minor scales, and the keys. It will help tremendously when you're playing, so that you don't forget all the accidentals (i.e. remember that a piece written in C major has only natural notes, G major and E minor have only 1 sharp, etc). Get an appropriate book (I teach at the local music ...


2

Considere a two-manual harpsichord. I think the notation is what was intended.


2

My way is always to reduce and simplify a piece e.g.as you say not play the octaves (l.h. Bass tone, r.h. only triads) and the arpeggio passage as block chord. If you have the music understood and “caught” (like we say in German begreifen for understanding = catch with your fingers!) you can be able to add the octaves. So your fingers will find the keys and ...


2

Seems to me you are making a very specific type of mistake over and over so I think your best course of action is to shelve the piece and discuss this with a teacher or at least a more experienced player to see if there is something you can change in your technique or something you can practice to improve your accuracy with jumps rather than continuing to ...


2

Not at all (if you don't have a ultra-small hand). My advice would be to play it just as it is written. The reason is that as you play more and more, your hand will be progressively more able to stretch, so after some time, you will be absolutely OK with it. On top of that, stretches like this just occur quite frequently on the guitar (they often arise ...


1

Bach rarely notated whether notes were legato or staccato. I would be perfectly idiomatic to play all the left hand 8th notes from the beginning to the middle of bar 3 staccato, in which case the problem doesn't arise. The idea that "everything should be played perfectly legato as written" is an unfortunate consequence of the way people are now taught to ...


1

When I am faced with faster moving pieces and larger gaps in between notes that are far apart in the staff, I often am unable to play it. I generally have to fake it even during concerts. Tips for how to sight read would be helpful since I lack heavily in this area. Exercise recommendations that will help improve my ability to play faster and cleaner would ...


1

Another technical point: the F on the left side of the line is doing double duty as part of the middle voice and part of the lower accompaniment. This creates a bit of difficulty, as you have to repeat that F on the third beat in the accompaniment, while holding it as part of the middle voice. The line is there in part to call that to the performer's ...


1

The line also makes it clearer that the two notes connected with the line should be played with the same hand (the left hand in this case)...although if your right hand can span a 10th, you can use your right hand for both of the last notes in the upper staff (the F above High C and the D above Middle C) while still following the fingering.


1

Like you said, it's just an indication that the voice is changing between the two clefs (F in the bass clef to D in the treble clef). These kind of lines are common when the author wants to show you how the voice is moving between clefs, when there is no beam to connect them (like the two previous notes in your example).


1

There's a session bassist in London who years ago developed a muting method he uses constantly. Thus his playing is super tidy. Even on 5-string, it involves each finger being on each string at any given moment, with the note needed being played by one of those fingers, while the other four (inc. thumb) mutes the others. It looks very complex, and does not ...


1

I've really never thought about this before, so I assumed I must be doing it automatically, without even thinking… so I tried to analyse what it is I may be doing. I normally play finger-style, rather than with a pick. With a pick you can always keep the rest of your hand ready to damp, so that's easy enough. Finger-style, on right hand unless I'm being ...


1

As written it's a somewhat difficult passage. The performance is much clearer when you consider the standard notation: the A on the first string has to be held until you hit the B note tabbed on the sixth string later in the measure. Since the B is two frets higher than the A, you'd need to do the slide with your ring finger, then reach a bit with the ...


1

There is a crucial piece of information missing from this TAB. What fingering is suggested for this? If you slide using the ring finger (or pinky) your index will be free to grab the 2nd fret and should not be a problem. Whether or not that seems reasonable depends on the notes before the 2 you've shown. If you really want help please post the entire line ...


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