Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
8

Sliding between two notes, up or down, and including the notes 'in the cracks' at the same time, is called portamento. It's been around for as long as the particular instruments it's possible to play it on. As you say, trombones, unfretted stringed instruments. It's possible also on trumpets and clarinets, easier to play in the upper registers.Slide guitar ...


4

Glissando, "glide from one pitch to another", or portamento, "pitch sliding from one note to another". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glissando https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portamento


4

Find a really good physical therapist, preferably one who works regularly with musicians. I had tough issues 18 months ago with (what I thought was) tendonitis. I play sax, clarinet and guitar. It was severe enough to cause me to take a break from playing. I initially saw one specialist who thought it was carpal tunnel, and recommended various exercises. ...


4

When has it first appeared in [Western] music? "Portamento [has been] considered an essential aspect of good singing for hundreds of years..." -- J. Potter, 2006, "The rise and fall of portamento in singing", Music & Letters 87(4), p. 523


3

I'd say that provided you can play the semiquavers/16ths in your left hand smoothly, and keep them running smoothly in that 3rd system's 1st bar as you pass them from your left hand to your right, go for it. There are several moments in piano works, I've found, where the notation suggests cross hands, but you can avoid it by suitably assigning notes to ...


3

Full explanation - You already know how to make the (b) sound. Build up pressure in your lips, but don't use your voice at all. Make a slight buzz with your lips (less than 1/10th of a second most of the time). The reason we use (b) instead of (p) is because (p) sounds like a snare in most cases, especially the (pf) snare. (b) sounds much more like a kick ...


2

They all play a part but the most important component of playing is what not to do. For instance, using two muscles at the same time to move one bone. Each muscle moves only one bone in one direction and there are opposite muscles which move the bone back. If you use two at the same time you create pulls or vector forces which wreak havoc on your ...


2

The start of the movement has some hand crossings that are explicitly marked with "s" and "d" (sinistra and destra) which are repeated later on. Looking at the bars after the hand crossing, the each hand continues to play the same note patterns, but uncrossed. So it is clear enough what the composer intended. If you can produce the same result without ...


1

"What sound should..." is the main driver of vocal technique in my opinion, based on my limited experience in classical voice training. I'm always surprised when my voice coach teaches me how to shape my mouth and hold my jaw to make a simple sound that I thought I knew how to make. There are possibly two things being combined in your question. Since you ...


1

"Hmmm" with closed mouth indeed is singing through the nose: The tone of course produced by vocal chords in your throat but it should not come out through your mouth: so it will not sound different from a "nnnnnn" (Humming is evoking and developing your spaces of resonance. You can feel this by the vibration of your cheeks, your nose and your breast and in ...


1

I have found that The Tersun Press exercises help develop facility especially in using your fifth and fourth fingers. In the Intermediate Exercise Book ..the first exercise..involves playing "broken" major seconds using various combinations of fingers in both hands. Beginning with thumb and second finger and ending with thumb and fifth fingers. At first ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible