5

I'm sure you already know the one word answer "Practice". Hilary Hahn's predecessor as world #1, Maxim Vengerov, released this short YouTube video describing how you should practice to play these triple stops He goes through the standard practice techniques: First break the process down into its simplest components....


5

Chopin and Liszt had different philosophies about writing heard/intended vs. held note values. Liszt had no compunctions about writing, say, left hand chords that cannot be held their entire value with the fingers (required elsewhere) and which therefore need the sostenuto pedal to "sound" their full indicated value (even when no pedal is ...


3

Okay, I watched a video to refresh my memory, and I chose a Hahn performance: . Here's the way I think about triple stops: it's going to be kind of like two double stops smushed together, or you could think about the lower double stop as sort of an appogiatura preceding the upper double stop. The goal is for all three pitches ...


1

...Any way of spotting where you land, etc? Using your I V example... ...that rhythm notation is a bit contrived, but I'm trying to approximate the idea of holding down the common piano key as a way to concentrate on it as the "spot" to target. Literally striking that common key with a quarter note while releasing the other fingers with the ...


1

Make sure you have a good posture, get good fingerings, and practice. An important thing is knowing when to jump. For example, you can switch from C major to 2nd inversion F major by just moving 2 fingers A good way to practice chord jumps is just playing a major / minor scale and adding a major / minor third and a perfect fifth, like this Once you can do ...


1

Only the most simplistic arrangement of a I - IV (surely I7 - IV7 if this is the blues?) involves the same jump in both hands. You're not going to play anything as lumpy as this, are you? This is more likely, and more useful. No jumps involved (note the fingerings I've added). But there are times when you'll need to jump. Here's a starter exercise, (...


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