11

"I know that the 4/4 time signature is played as [ONE-two-Three-four]." How do you know this? Is this from standard music training? In any time signature we need to somehow express the periodicity of the meter. There is a concept called metric accents. In reality you don't "need" to accent the strong beats of a time signature but ...


4

Good question! Made me think. The first beat of a bar - any bar - is generally accented, but by how much varies considerably, and sometimes depending on the phrasing, and the actual notes involved, it's not accented at all. Had there been a phrase mark over all six notes, then I wouldn't expect any accent on that F note. As it stands, it could have an accent ...


4

Practice on mouthpiece alone is an outstanding way to develop trumpet playing. Here are some suggestions for approaching it. Hold the mouthpiece as loosely as possible so that you don't pull back against your lips and teeth. I recommend thumb and ring finger if it's comfortable for your hand. You can balance the mouthpiece between the fingers rather than ...


3

Well, they are accented by nature, but what it does mean, that's a different story. Consider the motif of Bach's small fuga G major (BWV 557) (source): The 1st and 3rd beat of the beginning of the Fuga are empty, yet there is an accent on them (Bach was very systematic, so yes, there is). Also, organ doesn't really have "loudness" for single notes....


3

There is no fixed repetition count. You will definitely know once it is embedded in memory. The stages to embed a piece in memory are roughly: Play slowly. Play so slow, that your brain can keep up and you neither make mistakes nor need to slow/stop to prevent mistakes. Once you feel comfortable, speed it up a little. Again stay in a tempo with which your ...


2

Fingering I recommend 1-2-3 for Fx-G#-A#. That works best for my hand, and it's also the fingering used by the following performers (whose hands are visible): Rousseau Valentina Lisitsa Lang Lang Kassia (Helpful tip: on YouTube, you can use , and . to move frame by frame.) Relaxation Tensing up when playing fast is a frequent problem. You might be ...


2

To me it sounds like the sustain pedal of the piano being pressed (the sounds usually appears at the beginning of a new chord). If that is the case, it is strangely loud. Because it is in recordings from both artists, its either an intentional choice to keep them (maybe even amplify them?) or maybe both recorded in the same studio with the same old piano. On ...


2

You might want to check that the edition doesn't have mistakes, especially the cross rhythms (in contrast to classical music that often has many editions and editors per work that have corrected mistakes over a long period of time). And... trust your music theory rather than what is written. Just an example of one of your pieces: A from 8 Etudes, Op.42. ...


2

Rhythm As you pointed out, the difference between the rhythms in Scriabin's op. 8 no. 2 and op. 32 no. 1 is the presence of the rests in the latter. Because of those, try counting the two parts as 10 against 6 rather than 5 against 3. That will account directly for the rests rather than requiring you to interpolate them. A similar approach would be ...


2

Kevin, are you confident playing 3 against 5 without any dotted notes? I use certain (meaningless) sentences I worked out a long time ago to remind me of the tuplet relationships. Eg. "Who wants a nice cuppa tea" for 5 against 3. The '5 hand' plays "Who wants nice cup tea", while the '3 hand' plays only "Who a pa". And have you ...


2

Probably not what you want to hear, but tons of practice is the correct answer, and this goes for almost anything with music. From my experiences playing any instrument (and really anything in life that requires practice), you start slow and don't speed up until you can play it perfectly at a slow tempo. In the case of piano, I personally would section up ...


1

There is no supporting evidence that traditional grip has any technical or musical advantages over matched grip. There are facts that support matched grip - more muscles can be employed; less to learn; translates to tympani and mallet instruments more easily, among others. The ONLY reason to play tradition grip is a desire to play it, or to honor the aged ...


1

This might sound a little strange, but for some reason, the traditional grip simply feels better to me; it seems to work better regarding hemispheric brain integration. Of course, the traditional grip is not really "natural"; it's a little like patting your head and rubbing your stomach at the same time. After you learn it, tho, the match grip is ...


1

Don‘t use the chord and rhythm mode. You’re a human and not a computer. The latter is over- exactly. May be this the problem, as you say you know the chords well.


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