8

This is definitely possible, even with smaller hands, though the execution might be tricky depending on the speed of the passage. Play the first Db in the middle line and the Bb whole note above with the 1st and 3rd finger of your right hand while playing the low Gb with the 5th finger of your left. (ignore the top Bb, as it is tied to the note in the ...


5

It looks like you are trying to play an open G maj chord but that's hard to tell from the pic. In general a collapsed finger joint is not proper. With practice and correct posture that should not happen. Of course there are exceptions to every rule and people have different body sizes and shapes. Sometimes deviations make certain fingering difficult. ...


4

You need to realize that pianists and piano teachers are sometimes judged more by reputation and "genealogy" than anything else. If you were a pupil of a pupil of a pupil of a pupil of Liszt, that automatically makes you a minor deity, whether or not you can actually play or teach. The same applies to having studied at Juilliard (or name your favourite non-...


4

Both concepts have their place, along with several other ideals. It depends a lot on what the music is, where it originated, what you want to do with it, how you make it play most effectively - all for starters. As a teacher, I welcome other methods of playing/learning to play, and quite like it when a challenge such as this arises. It affords a different ...


4

The video shows how someone plays this piece! As Old Brixtonian says, you have to play the Gb in the l.h. just in advance of the 16th notes:


4

I am not a doctor, nor an academically trained musician who received formal posture education, but I'll try to answer. Also this is my first activity on here, so If I get anything wrong, please let me know. Just a couple of observations: 1) Different peoples have different bodies. As an example, my fingers are physically unable to bend like that, while ...


4

I've found the hardest thing about learning guitar is getting over that first hump. It can be physically painful while building finger strength. That along with progressing quickly enough to maintain interest are the biggest hurdles. I originally attacked the physical end with simple exercises. They build strength and flexibility to place your fingers ...


3

The trick is to use 2, 3, and 4 on the G♭–A♭–B♭ stretch in the first half of the scale; otherwise you'll use a thumb, pinky, or have to oddly cross over during that stretch of black keys, none of which are ideal. R: 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 L: 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2


3

Specifically for playing triplets, where the music is counted in 3s. Don't know why the middle finger isn't used instead of the ring, though. Might have something to do with the length of fingers - some players (not me!) have similar length i and a, but m is much longer.


3

If the top note is tied and not slurred, you could hit the first 16th note with your right thumb. The movement required by both hands after that is possibly uncomfortable but worth a try...


2

The general question is: how do you play legato (strike a new note before releasing the previous note) when your hand is already doing something else, thereby limiting your choice of fingering? There is no general answer, but rather a collection of tricks that you learn as you go through more and more advanced repertoire. Successive intervals in one hand ...


2

Preamble The other answers don't really discuss the technical part, they just give advice on how to deal with varying opinions. This is very valuable, but I thought discussing technique would still be an important addition. (After all, that's what the question is about.) Now I am not familiar with Dorothy Taubman, but looking at the Wikipedia article you ...


1

Take the polyrhythm carefully counted out in the largest common subdivison, and drum it on a table with one line to a hand (e.g., semiquavers with the left, triplets with the right). An easy way to do this is to count the rhythm as though it's an entire bar, I first learned to play 3:4 by counting my right hand in 3/4 beats, bringing my left hand down on 1-e-...


1

for anyone looking at this that plays piano, I highly recommend Josh Wright's tutorials. at first when i tried using them, they didn't work quite right. now, after only a month they have helped dramatically. not saying I can suddenly play HR2, but I am getting a lot better.


1

I agree with the other answers there are as many ways playing piano, learning and teaching the piano as there are ways to Rome. We don‘t have to change our teachers (and doctors, coaches, political leaders etc. as far they are not doctrinaire, intolerant, tyrannical and as long they show their respect to as as we are respecting them. I had piano teachers, ...


1

Fortissimo Or triple forte - fortississimo - I suppose is the proper thing to mean as loud as possible. In that particular recording it sounds like there is a bass drum or some other percussion also being used. That seems to be what is producing the big thud.


1

My experience is that you will need to be nasal to sing in the mask. The air flow (which produces the sound) will need to pass through both the mouth and the nose. For sufficient air flow (the amount of air must be huge!) you will need a lot of space inside your mouth (note that it does not mean that your jaw is opened as open as you can!). The space inside ...


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