76

My teacher instructed me to think of two different approaches to practice: "Stop" -- where you are trying to learn the piece, work out the fingering (or other technical aspects) etc. You're not too concerned with keeping time, and when you make a mistake you stop, go back (maybe to the beginning of the phrase) and fix it. This mode allows you to fix in ...


39

Three hours at one session! Unless you're the sort of person who can concentrate really well for that length of time, you've wasted at least some of it. Harsh, but realistic. Most of us cannot give 100% for that length of time! If you can organise your time into (much) smaller chunks, the progress will usually be speeded up. Perhaps even 20 minutes at a ...


37

Not everybody can do this but the trick is your finger forms a 2nd, partial barre at the 3rd fret, but bends so it raises above the highest string. Some people play A like this as standard however I believe it partly comes down to luck how long your fingers are, how practical this technique will be. Check out this awful drawing:


37

I use this kind of "A-shape" barre chord all the time, although I must admit I rarely teach it to students. I actually find it easier than using fingers 2, 3 and 4 to play the three fret 3 notes. All you have to do is bend your third L.H. finger backwards, so that the joint nearest the knuckle moves forwards and away from string 1. Here's a picture of me ...


34

If you would like to see a tour de force in the use of repeated notes, have a look at Martha Argerich's performance of Scarlatti's D Minor Sonata: You will notice that she uses 321321 for the rapid notes. Since the accents fall on the first, third and fifth notes, you will see that a different finger is used for each ...


34

Two big factors affect the decision to play open versus fretted: Sound: Open notes sound brighter and tend to sustain longer. They are great to use for pedal tones for this reason. But that means they can sound too loud or otherwise stand out next to other fretted notes. Playability: In certain cases, open notes are actually harder to play than fretted ...


34

There are a few reasons that I found these technical drills helpful as a piano player: They help practice playing the hands together clearly and cleanly. Young piano players often play both hands "together," but the articulations between the hands are not actually in sync. As such, the result is one of constant flam and grace-note relationships between the ...


32

Even if one can ever be too old to learn an instrument (I don't think so), then this is definitely not the case already at 22. You may not be able to make as fast progress as if you had learned it at 13, but ultimately it's up to how much effort you put in. Practive five minutes every week, and it'll probably not go anywhere. But practice half an hour every ...


31

The direct answer: No, this is not good teaching There is very little difference between electric and acoustic guitar. Playing all 6 strings can be absolutely fine on either. Many barre chords are 6 string. The question should really be "...shouldn't play all 6 strings together when using distortion" When you use distortion you add in harmonics which ...


30

Aha, I've found the answer: Asynchrony! Asynchrony is a general term which is used to describe playing notes in a separated or not-quite-together fashion where they are written as if they should normally be played at the same time in the score, for example a chord to which an arpeggiation is applied, or a left-hand bass note and right-hand melody note ...


30

Almost for sure, the problem is that as you approach upper limits, you exert yourself more. When you're playing fast, your muscles have to relax INSTANTLY (like, already relaxing while you're pushing them down). The rule of thumb is this: the harder something is, the MORE relaxed you have to be in order to play it. Try the following checklist (I'll give ...


29

Certainly children learn more quickly than adults, particularly when it comes to languages, and to skills. (That is, "proficiency, facility, or dexterity that is acquired or developed through training or experience.") As a former US Figure Skating Basic Skills instructor, I observed this effect time and again when teaching school-age children as compared ...


28

There's nothing impossible in the notation; sure, it's fast, and there's an unhealthy obsession with semiquavers, but I'm pretty sure that it could be played. Could I play it? No. But that's because I'm not motivated enough to practice it. Or actually talented, but that's beside the point. Could the average pianist play it? Maybe. Could a professional? Sure;...


28

The length of the string is truly not changing, but there are other things that affect the frequency of the string vibrations. One is the density of the material (obviously this is not what vibrato changes), another is the cross-section of the string (ditto). The last one is the tension in the string. And that's what's being used here. Essentially, you ...


27

You may be interested in checking out some of the pedagogy of Arnold Jacobs, the long-time tuba player of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. I know this seems unrelated to your question, but he discussed at length the role of muscle memory in musical performance and how to overcome issues related to it. One of his big concepts was that you can't really unlearn ...


26

I'm going to post the dissenting answer here in that I feel like you don't want to look for a different kind of guitar or a perfect strap height. Most of my time in bands has been with at least one female guitarist or guitarist/bassist in the band, and in one band that I was in for a few years I was the only man. I also am a big fan of several bands feature ...


25

The top staff is the (vocal) melody. In principle this could be given to the vocal performer by itself for him/her to sing from in a vocalist+pianist type of situation; as the pianist, you do not play these. The lower two staves comprise the grand staff common to piano music. As indicated in other answers this is organized so as to show the right vs. left ...


25

For what it's worth, here's what Berlioz has to say in his Treatise on Instrumentation: The composer, when indicating the use of mutes in the middle of a piece (by the words con sordini), must not forget to allow sufficient time for putting them on. He should provide a rest in the violins, equal in length to about two bars in 4-4 time, moderato. The ...


25

Lots of classical music require retuning of timpani (or purchasing a larger drum set). Von Biber's Rosary Sonatas require retuning a violin between each section.


23

The black and white bits are the same, except you will probably only get 49/61 of them instead of the 88 you're probably used to. The action will be rather different, too. No matter how loudly or quietly you try to play, the volume will remain the same. There is no sustain pedal, so that will be different, too. You'll have to acclimatise yourself to playing ...


23

A form of rubato. More specifically 'playing behind the beat'. Jazz pianist Errol Gardner did something rather similar when he '...developed a signature style that involved his right hand playing behind the beat while his left strummed a steady rhythm and punctuation'. Though in the Chopin there's flexibility of rhythms in both hands, the LH 'beat-...


22

It is hard to not touch other strings when you bend, especially if you bend wider than a semitone. The trick here is to mute strings that are not supposed to sound to eliminate unwanted noise instead of trying to not touch them. Some ways to do that are: Mute with the index finger of your fretting (left) hand and use middle and ring fingers to bend. Push ...


22

In "The Rite of Spring" Stravinsky requires the celli to detune their A-strings to G-sharp for the final chord of the piece (and asks them to play a four-note chord "non arpeggiato"!): Similarly at the end of Jörg Widmann's Viola Concerto the soloist has to detune the C-string over several measures:


21

It's obvious when you think about it, but the biggest difference between an organ and a piano is the way their sounds decay. A piano is a hammer hitting a string. The loudest sound is right at the beginning, and from there on the sound decays organically as the string returns to rest. If you let the dampers do their thing, the decay is shortened, but it's ...


21

There's a little bit of key noise and the rate of damper drop and any resulting damper noises are affected by release. At the highest levels of performance and tone, these noises are important even if they are very quiet. Besides that fairly minor audible impact, my understanding of release is that it is a combination of ergonomic and visual. Piano ...


19

Wrist pain may be "normal" in the sense that many players encounter it at some point. But it is not "normal' in the sense that you should ignore it. I have seen injuries take down some very talented and able people. If you experience pain and discomfort, especially at times when you are not playing, then you should consult with a doctor, not other guitar ...


18

No the difference is not subtle, but rather basic: a triplet is a note length modification, so e.g. three notated eights use just the time for two standard eights. (Triplets and other tuplets exist for other note values as quarters, etc. as well.) But all notes are visisble in the score. a trill is a kind of ornamentation. Instead of a long (e.g. full) note ...


17

You're on the right track. It's actually a combination of some of the elements that you've mentioned. If the band is not playing together, then they won't be "in the pocket", this much is clear. It goes a bit deeper than just simply staying together and playing at the same tempo. It can also be song-based, meaning it's dependent on the tempo of the song. Let'...


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