30

Almost for sure, the problem is that as you approach upper limits, you exert yourself more. When you're playing fast, your muscles have to relax INSTANTLY (like, already relaxing while you're pushing them down). The rule of thumb is this: the harder something is, the MORE relaxed you have to be in order to play it. Try the following checklist (I'll give ...


28

The length of the string is truly not changing, but there are other things that affect the frequency of the string vibrations. One is the density of the material (obviously this is not what vibrato changes), another is the cross-section of the string (ditto). The last one is the tension in the string. And that's what's being used here. Essentially, you ...


27

You may be interested in checking out some of the pedagogy of Arnold Jacobs, the long-time tuba player of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. I know this seems unrelated to your question, but he discussed at length the role of muscle memory in musical performance and how to overcome issues related to it. One of his big concepts was that you can't really unlearn ...


25

Lots of classical music require retuning of timpani (or purchasing a larger drum set). Von Biber's Rosary Sonatas require retuning a violin between each section.


22

In "The Rite of Spring" Stravinsky requires the celli to detune their A-strings to G-sharp for the final chord of the piece (and asks them to play a four-note chord "non arpeggiato"!): Similarly at the end of Jörg Widmann's Viola Concerto the soloist has to detune the C-string over several measures:


16

When it comes to fingering questions, the broader the question the more the answer will be: "it depends." That is probably why you find conflicting information online, too many answers that don't provide the specific context for one fingering approach versus another. You can say that generally your fingers get placed about mid-way along the length ...


15

Called a double stop as two (sometimes 3) strings are being held down/played simultaneously. Usually the notes are part of a harmony, but can be the same as each other. In that case, I'd expect them to be called unison double stops.


15

Summary The following general principles/techniques for handling large chords are given below: Flatten the hand Shift the hand away from the body, toward the fall board Play multiple notes with one finger Redistribute notes across both hands Play one or more notes as ornaments (i.e., grace notes) Roll the chord Leave out one or more notes Re-voice the chord ...


15

Theoretically yes. Most probably, no. As with many other things, a teacher is not absolutely fundamental, but a professional guidance ensures that: you follow an appropriate didactic path tailored on you, your needs and capabilities, focusing on improving your gaps and enhancing your strengths; you don't lose time with unnecessary or even wrong suggestions ...


15

In relation to the violin (or other string instrument) the specific technique described — using the tuning peg to detune and retune a pitch — is called peg scordatura (also peg glissando and glissando scordatura). A very clear example of this occurs in Alfred Schnittke's Stille Nacht (1978) for violin and piano. At the end of the piece, the violin detunes ...


15

The particular vibrato that Eric is using is fairly specific to electric guitar playing. Its side to side motion changes the pitch of the fretted note and can be miminal, so very subtle, to more than a tone up and down. Whilst adding character to the note played (the speed of the vibrato will not always be the same), it also rubs the string across the ...


14

I agree with the other two answers, knocking that corner down a bit with either sandpaper or a fine file will help but I would like to also offer two tips on your technique. There isn’t a reason for your hand to make contact with the neck in that spot. It looks like your thumb is in a pretty good spot but try placing it just a hair lower, more towards the ...


14

In order to go faster, you need to practice a lot slower. Yes, I know exactly how counter-intuitive that sounds. Bass/guitar player here, in a thrash metal band, playing at way too many BPM. The problem you're encountering is not that you're physically incapable of playing fast, it's that you're not accurate doing so. In order to break that wall, you need to ...


13

The technique you describe is called étouffée. It is indeed less frequently used. I would say the main reason is that you can mute strings stronger with palm muting, which produces a more distinct effect. Also placing fingers on top of the frets requires some more precision in the fretting hand. However, if you find an application for this technique, go ...


13

I think you might be exaggerating a bit. For example, flat picking and finger picking I think are both learned by any competent player. I think a lot of guitar players at least try to develop familiarity with a lot of techniques and types of guitars. But I agree there is sure to be genre specialization. If you don't like metal, it's hard to imagine someone ...


13

I'm not a harp player, but it appears that this is done with the harp equivalent of prepared piano on a few strings. About four or five strings of the harp appear to have some kind of putty attached to them: At least one of the strings in the higher range is "prepared" in the same way. This would certainly affect the timbre and resonance of the ...


13

The movements are similar, the effects are similar, but the causes are different. Vibrato on a violin string is due to the length of the string changing. The player's finger rolls up and down the length of the string, which changes its pitch. On classical guitar (electric and acoustic players also use it) the action of rolling the finger, within the confines ...


13

Let me answer another question: « Is it ok to play everything with the thumb, except parts that absolutely need a plectrum? » Now, we could start with the usual platitude that everything is “ok” in music. Yeah, you can play with the thumb if you're satisfied with that. But I will say that playing with the thumb alone is extremely limiting. Anything you can ...


12

Yes. The word "stop" refers to where the string is stopped, meaning where it ends. So, first think of the nut as the stop for an open string. When you finger the strings on the neck you are making a new stop. And, of course, double stop just means you are doing that on two strings. It doesn't matter what the interval is. The point is how many ...


11

Sandpaper. It sounds like a joke, but the nut is there to hold the string, and the sharp edges are not necessary. Round it down for comfort.


11

That is vibrato, which is a common technique with most stringed instruments. a slightly tremulous effect imparted to vocal or instrumental tone for added warmth and expressiveness by slight and rapid variations in pitch (SOURCE: Merriam-Webster) Various finger techniques to produce vibrato are used for stringed instruments, but many other instruments (can) ...


10

Ievan Polkka There are two things happening here: In the preceding section, the left hand is playing pairs of notes simultaneously. However, beginning at 2:03, the left hand plays broken chords. Broken chords, also called arpeggios, are when notes forming a single unit (a chord) are played individually. The right hand plays the melody with ornamentation, ...


10

The existing answers are all good - to add something else to the mix though: For a particularly extreme example, Michael Manring the experimental bass guitarist enjoyed the expressive possibilities of retuning mid performance so much that he had an instrument purpose built to allow him to retune quickly on the fly. This eventually has extended to whole ...


10

Banjo is commonly played in several different tunings. Some banjos are fitted with cam tuners (known as D tuners, Scruggs tuners or Keith tuners) which facilitate fast, accurate retuning between two fixed notes, and which are also used to good effect during playing. Here's an except from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beacon_Banjo_Company explaining the ...


10

There's a practice technique called "building a bridge". I bet you can play m7 on its own just fine. The challenge is to bridge over that measure: to get from m6 to m8 without falling in a hole. What you need is secure foundations on either side. The problem isn't m7 itself, it's something in your state of mind as you approach it. Try this: ...


10

The notation shown in the video — the standard tremolo notation — is the correct way to indicate a flutter. In can (should) be supplemented with "f.t" (flutter tongue) for clarity. As long as a note has no tremolo, it will be played normally. For an extended passage, you can write "flutter" at the beginning and either use a dotted line (...


9

It should be attacked three times. The melody and chords are clearly two distinct voices. Actually, I can't think of a context in piano music where you wouldn't attack a harmonic unison on two different beats as notated (unless there was a tie written in, of course). In contrast to some of the other answers, I don't consider this to be sloppy notation. If ...


9

Providing the two pianos are pretty well identical in sound, there will be little if no difference. The problem that arises is pedalling. Generally it's down to the secundo player to operate the sustain pedal - it's slightly easier to stretch out one's right leg than to cross over the legs for the player on the right - even worse to get used to operating the ...


9

Answer is - it depends!. Since our fingers aren't all the same length, each will press down its individual note at a different point anyway. Thumb, being a couple of inches less reach than the middle finger, will usually press near the end of the key nearest to the player, while middle will generally press close to the black keys' ends. But - there are going ...


9

Premise: I'm italian, and I am really fanatic about our language pronunciation and writing, including their meaning, context and history, especially when related to music. Now, the keyword here is elision, even if this often happens as a similar aspect, apocope. The elision is when an unstressed vowel (or syllable) is omitted at the end of a word when the ...


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