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1

Assume you want to play a D one octave higher than the D-string. That is the 3rd finger on the A-string. So you put a tape there. Now your student puts the 3rd finger down on the tape and play, then lift the finger, put it down again and play. But the second time the finger was off by one milimeter compared with the first time. Therefore the note will be ...


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Because nobody past a year or maybe two (for small kids) is going to use tape markers, and nobody with less than maybe 5 -10 years of playing is going to try to play in JI or any non-ET tuning, just put the tape on ET locations. And as I commented -- playing in tune requires training the fingers & arm to position correctly. Ear training is there to ...


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IOW: since the tapes are just rough guides, it's ok to put them in ET, since eventually each pitch needs to be tuned be ear anyway. Is that right? Yes. I sure love a question with a straightforward answer.


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IAAC (I am a cellist :-) ). While we often check our tuning via this harmonic - to - harmonic method, the preferred final test is to play open double-stops and verify 'true-temperament' fifths by the absence of undertone buzz. This ensures we don't interfere with ourselves when open strings are used. Otherwise, I agree with leftroundabout that ...


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First of all the "harmonics" you generate by attacking the strings properly are a property of the string. In my opinion they are not necessarily "easy" to produce. Also, if you use "harmonics" alone then your equal tempered notes will fall out of alignment so there is a bit of a compromise to make. You excite the harmonic by touching the string at a node ...


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The closer to the bridge you pluck, the better defined will be any harmonic. The smaller the fingerprint on the node, the better defined will be the harmonic. You don't even need to take your finger off immediately after you play the harmonic - which someone will probably tell you. In fact, you can put that finger back touching the string - at the node - ...


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How to get the loudest, most sustained harmonics I've found that the volume and sustain of the harmonics correlates pretty directly with the volume and sustain of the instrument in general. Therefore, if you are looking only to play loud, distinct harmonics, I would recommend an electric guitar. Mix the neck and bridge pickups, with the volume and tone on ...


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Among guitars, I'd say any cheap acoustic guitar with heavy roundwound strings will produce comparatively loud harmonics.


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It can be worse on the guitar. I had a very good guitar player in one of my bands who asked me (I was also a math professor) why tuning his guitar exactly by ear for each string would fail; he had very good pitch discrimination and could hear the problems. What he was doing was tuning fourths perfectly with a 4/3 ratio (by ear); then tuning the third to 5/4 ...


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It does apply to any instrument, but for cello it's perhaps most notable because we so often play with instruments that have E-strings: violins, or else guitars. If you tune a cello in Pythagorean fifths down from an A-reference, and then a violinist tunes her e-string up a fifth from that, what you end up is a Pythagorean major third (plus three octaves) ...


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