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42

Let's start a list! Hip Hop is around 80-115 BPM Triphop / Downtempo around 90-110 BPM Concert marches are typically ~120 BPM. House varies between 118 and 135 BPM UK garage/2-step is usually between 130-135 BPM UK funky is around 130 BPM Techno 120-160 BPM Generally around 120-135 Acid Techno 135-150 Schranz around 150 Dubstep is around 140 BPM 70's to ...


38

First, I think that it would be difficult to read a piece of music with no bar lines. The bar lines help to break longer streams of notes into regularized and easily digestible chunks. But it is also not true that a stream of 16 quarter notes should represent the same thing as four bars of four quarter notes. For example, typically in 4/4 time the One and ...


33

Rubato. This specifically means compensating for each slow-down with a speed-up. If there was a click track, you'd come out on the right beat at the end! 'Rubato' doesn't instruct you to play the slow bits soft, the fast bits loud though. If you want the more common effect of slowing down at the 'expressive' bits but never really making up the time, ...


29

It would be more accurate to say that cut time "will sound twice as fast as the same notes played in 4/4 at the same tempo". That's essentially what they're trying to get across. But even that wouldn't really be accurate. Cut time is a duple meter, 4/4 is a quadruple meter. The difference is subtle, but it's still a difference.


26

The term you are looking for is A piacere (It.). This basically means that the piece should be played at the performers discretion with regard to tempo and rhythm. Literally, "at pleasure".


25

Tempo 1 or Tempo I instructs a performer to return to the first tempo of a movement or piece of music, where there has been a different tempo marking since the first marking. The marking Tempo Primo is also used. It is the equivalent, on a larger scale, of an a tempo marking following a rit. or rall. marking.


23

Tempo primo, or Tempo 1ᵒ means “at the same tempo as the piece started”.


22

The simple answer is no. Think of it this way: Does a composer write pieces only for instruments he can play? No, he does not. He might compose pieces for instruments that he has never touched in his life. You don't have to be a virtuoso pianist to compose fast music. You have to learn how to imagine what you want to compose. If you can imagine your piece ...


21

This line refers to the I, not to the "Allegro". As OP mentioned in the comments, the I stands for the first position, i. e. the first fret on the guitar. So the line means, that all notes under it have to be played in the first position.


20

It sounds to me like you are using the metronome in an effective manner. Your teacher might have been concerned that you, as a young student, would have seen playing in perfect time as an artistic objective. Of course it is rarely such. The musical artist is expressing emotion and other aesthetic insights. Variety of all kinds should be deployed for that ...


20

That sentence "Played twice as fast as written" indicates that someone must have a misunderstanding. Someone who probably thinks that quarter notes are supposed to be played at a certain speed. That person would need more knowledge and experience with both tempo markings and different kinds of time signatures. I suppose you could say that in the beginning ...


19

I'd definitely recommend a metronome, especially when the rythms are trickier. I basically use it for these types of exercises: the ones with difficult rythms, and the ones where the point is to build up velocity. The latter ones, I use a metronome to keep in check, because the main mistake in virtuosity exercises is to want to go too fast too soon and then ...


18

Counting is an absolutely necessary step when learning a new piece.It is the rhythmic framework of any piece. Without it, you may well be playing a different tune. 'All the right notes, but not in the right timing'. You ask 'do they count all the time?' Well there's no need once a piece is well known to the player. We sound out words as kids, but eventually ...


18

Please count 1-2-3-4,1-2-3-4, then at the same tempo (speed/ bpm) count 1-2-3-1-2-3. If you can't feel or tell the difference, then, you're right, there's no need for bars. If you can, then how will someone else know which is which?


17

This is a terrific, and very important, question! Have you ever heard a recording of yourself speaking? Did it come across as odd to you? Did you ever think "that's not how I sound!"? The same is often true when we play an instrument. In fact, playing an instrument is even more complex. In a kind of auditory McGurk Effect, our brain has to distinguish ...


17

There’s not much (if any) difference in the tempo they imply, but there’s a difference in character. Literally, con brio means with spirit, while con fuoco means with fire. Regarding tempo, both are traditionally taken to mean that it should be a little faster than it otherwise would be — allegro con brio/fuoco a bit faster than a typical allegro, and ...


16

YES! Of course. That's the best thing to do. Every time you can't play a song at its normal bpm / speed (tempo), decrease the speed to a point where you feel comfortable with, and practice it there. After some practice, you'll be able to increase the bpm/ speed and after a while, you'll be able to play it at its normal speed. This is good practice for ...


16

The important thing is to feel the pulse of the tempo in your head as you play. Tap your foot if it helps you. When listening to music, tap your foot, clap or drum on your legs, to reinforce that instinct for rhythm. Do, however, bear in mind that when playing unaccompanied, it's not always vital to keep a rigid tempo. Some pieces benefit from expressive ...


16

To find the length in seconds of each beat for any given metronome marking in beats-per-minute (bpm), you would divide 60 (the number of seconds in a minute) by the bpm marking. For instance, if a piece has a metronome marking of crotchet (quarter-note) = 120, each crotchet beat is 0.5 seconds long (60/120). You can follow this simple rule to find the ...


16

No, it is not 150 bpm. A tempo indication is an indication of beats per minutes. A tempo of 100 means 100 beat in a minute. It's how a metronome plays beats. Your watch moves the second at a bpm of 60, because there are 60 seconds in a minute, hence 60 beats. A tempo of 100, be them quarter notes, eight notes, dotted quarter notes, is a tempo of a hundred, ...


16

Of course, playing only one of them with no other context wouldn't sound like triplets, no matter what the note lengths were. As already mentioned, playing the 1st & 3rd triplet gives you a swing beat. Playing or even just emphasising only the 2nd triplet is more rare. I can think of no finer example than this.. Tears for Fears - Everybody Wants to ...


15

The answer here is deceptively simple: Polytempo. There are other names, such as multi-tempo, polytemporal, and others, but they all describe the same phenomena. Here is a link for further reading on Wikipedia. For a list of composers that have used this technique, as well as the pieces in which this technique was used, check out this page and look under "...


14

Agitato is generally understood to be allegro agitato — allegro plus agitation — unless there is something to indicate otherwise. Allegro is generally around 3 times as fast as lento (~144 versus ~50 bpm), so you can get an idea of the tempo change from that. It's quite significant. (So in one sense, I disagree with Mark; the house on fire ...


14

For the most part, the time signature indicates what kind of feel the beat of the piece has. Consider waltzes, usually written in 3/4 – the beat goes ONE two three, ONE two three, ONE two three. Although you could write it as ONE two three, FOUR five six, ONE two three, FOUR five six with a time signature of 6/4, there's no point because the beat still ...


14

Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? No, it is not a device commonly used in popular music. However, this technique is extremely common in other forms of music. There are no good reasons to avoid this technique, band musicians are still ...


14

Just use text. I would put this information with the D.C. (or D.S.) marking and with the original tempo marking. But I would put it inside a bracket. So for instance, at the beginning: "Allegro (faster on D.C.)" or "Allegro (faster 2nd time)" and "D.C. al Coda (faster 2nd time)" You could even write the actual change of tempo. For instance: "Allegro (...


12

How does the genre of music affect the feel of speed? And how does a genre hit upon an inherent range of tempos to use, as in this question? Before I answer your question, it should be clarified that there is a difference between genre and ensemble. Genre concerns identifiable stylistic traits, whereas ensemble concerns instrumentation. In other words, a ...


12

Whilst even time-sigs are far more common that odd ones, once the 'feel' of a tune is running, most people will go with the flow. Even when there is a change of time in the middle of a line, most people don't spot it. Having sung/played 'The 12 Days of Christmas' (topical !) for many years, it took me by surprise when I looked at the music; the time changed ...


12

This means "approximately equal to". I found this with a quick Google search. Here is an example of a webpage confirming the meaning of this symbol. I must confess, I prefer to use "c.", the abbreviation for circa, in metronome markings. Here's an example: I've also seen the "wiggly" equal sign used in metronome marks. It's the top one at this webpage (...


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