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29

It would be more accurate to say that cut time "will sound twice as fast as the same notes played in 4/4 at the same tempo". That's essentially what they're trying to get across. But even that wouldn't really be accurate. Cut time is a duple meter, 4/4 is a quadruple meter. The difference is subtle, but it's still a difference.


21

This line refers to the I, not to the "Allegro". As OP mentioned in the comments, the I stands for the first position, i. e. the first fret on the guitar. So the line means, that all notes under it have to be played in the first position.


21

I think it depends very much on the genre, style, and period of the music. For some styles, heavy use of rubato is normal and suits the way the music is written, while for others it would spoil the piece.  (Think how bad a rock song would sound if the drummer kept varying the tempo!)  Even within Western classical music, rubato is much more common (and ...


20

That sentence "Played twice as fast as written" indicates that someone must have a misunderstanding. Someone who probably thinks that quarter notes are supposed to be played at a certain speed. That person would need more knowledge and experience with both tempo markings and different kinds of time signatures. I suppose you could say that in the beginning ...


16

Of course, playing only one of them with no other context wouldn't sound like triplets, no matter what the note lengths were. As already mentioned, playing the 1st & 3rd triplet gives you a swing beat. Playing or even just emphasising only the 2nd triplet is more rare. I can think of no finer example than this.. Tears for Fears - Everybody Wants to ...


16

It's not bad per se, but it's dangerous. Making this a habit will impair your ability to play with others. As an expressive device, varying the tempo can be distracting. (That's why it's notated more rarely than varying the dynamics.) The exception that proves the rule here is instruments that can't vary dynamics. When one famous harpsichordist "held on ...


13

Depends. Some people use 'expressive rubato' as an excuse for bad time-keeping. In particular an excuse for playing the tricky bits slower than the easy bits! Flexible time is probably a bad idea in a rhythmic groove-based song. It's almost required in an operatic aria though. The fact that sometimes a metronome isn't appropriate doesn't make ...


11

As Lawrence said, you are describing "Rubato". My professor in college recommended playing the piece first at a more "rigid" tempo and then using your own discretion. You want rubato to feel tasteful enough so that a professional listening in the audience could dictate the rhythm you played without seeing it. In general, a solo will have more rubato and ...


10

Not associated with the time change, just coincidental. On guitar music, there's often a Roman numeral printed to suggest a good position on the neck to play that section. Here, it's the scale of the F Mixolydian mode, starting from 1st fret bottom string. So a sensible position to play all the notes would be starting o that very fret. Although, promoting an ...


9

Word by word: con - with più - more fuoco - fire possibile - possible In Italian, "possibile" stuck on the end of a phrase means "as much [preceding thing] as possible". So translated as a phrase: "With as much fire as possible"


9

That looks like guitar music (single staff, G clef, Arabic numbers that make sense for guitar fingerings). If so... It gives you the position that passage is to be played in The Bb note in the preceding measure can't be played on any of the five lowest frets. Given the fingering for that note and the ones that follow, the music is indicating third ...


9

What would this be in bpm? It would be 72 bpm. The fact that the metronome setting is given for the dotted quarter note indicates that each dotted quarter note is one beat. Besides, 216 bpm is far too fast to be practical. And does 6/8 change anything? Aside from the meter, no. For example, if the metronome mark were the same in a 3/8 or 9/8 or 12/8 ...


8

It may be that the e-book used the same notation example written in 4/4 earlier, and is indicating to play this version faster? You are correct that the time signature is not the indicator for tempo. There is an old tradition of using Alla Breve to indicate the piece is a faster tempo, but current practice is to use tempo markings. The cut time choice ...


7

There is the concept (not specific to music) of Speech Tempo. As you will see from the article, there is some degree of discussion about how this should be measured - for example, words per minute, syllables per second, or sounds per second. One could imagine even deeper levels of granularity - such as the inclusion of changes in pitch or timbre as sound '...


6

First is to record what you all do when playing together. It could be any one of you that's throwing timing out. Listen back, and you'll have a far better idea. In one band I played bass, and the drummer and I couldn't gel. He insisted his timing was spot on, until we listened to a few recordings, when even one of the guitarists told him he was fluctuating ...


6

It's a tempo marking. There's no strict definition, but a medium tempo is often in the range of ~100-150 bpm. The marking Med. Bossa Nova means to play a bossa nova groove/style at a medium tempo. The Bossa Nova groove doesn't always have to be played at medium tempo. For example, check out this fast version of Girl From Ipanema, which is usually played at ...


5

We may miss some details depending on the particular musical example, but in general these indications are telling you two things: the meter and the tempo. In 4 quarter = 126 This is saying that the meter is "in 4"; in other words, you should conceptualize each measure as having four beats. Furthermore, the quarter note will appear at a tempo of 126 ...


5

What I do in these cases is to listen to the drums. Listen to what the drummer is playing and you can easily deduct the tempo. In this song, the Kick Drum and the Snare Drum are being played on the beats 1,3 and 2,4 respectively and they are quarter notes. These quarter notes are on 125bpm, no matter how fast the flute is playing. This is really common for ...


5

This question is often subjective, but there are some objective rationalizations that make things easier. I would strongly recommend transcribing this in a way that doesn't use so many small note values. Not only does this match the feel of the music better, it will also be easier for a performer to read; those 64th notes in the 125bpm transcription are ...


5

Metronone markings can be very specific. For example "Play this at 100 crotchets (quarter notes) a minute". Does that mean that if you play it at 90 or play it at 110 you are getting it wrong? Some people might think so. So often you can relax it a bit and say "Play this at something between 90 and 110 crotchets a minute". Now you have suggested that ...


5

The answer is "harmonic rhythm". Your piece has one chord change per bar throughout (except for bar 16). That makes it sound like it's really an adagio at 48 BPM, except there are a lot of fast notes not going anywhere in particular. In the Mozart, the longest chord changes are every half note, and in many places the harmony is changing every quarter or ...


5

The "in due" here means to conduct it in two. This edition is written in common (4/4) time, which is often conducted in four. But the directions here state that the piece is slow, but conducted in two. Otherwise, if someone were to conduct it slowly in four, it may actually end up being twice as slow as intended (hence the "ma in due": but in two). And the ...


4

It's worth realising that the bass guitar is part of the rhythm section. It is vital that the bass and drums are together. They lay down a clear framework over which the lead instruments can deliberately play ahead or behind the beat. It is worth just you and the drummer practising together before anyone else joins in (even arrange a separate session). The ...


4

No, it's not current... and it doesn't really make much sense. (How fast is it "written"?) Your assertion that time signatures do not dictate tempo is correct. Certain meters might imply faster tempi (6/4 is probably going to be used for slower pieces, and 12/16 is usually seen in fast pieces like gigues) but those are general usages, not requirements.


4

In a simple sense, it is correct. "Whatever tempo you have in mind, this is twice as fast as that". This works on the assumption that most people are used to the quarter note being the beat, which happens to be true. But it basically means that the pulse of the song will be on the half-notes. If someone was standing there waving a baton in front of you, ...


4

The tempo marking for the first movement of the Hammerklavier sonata is quite famous. Beethoven writes that it should be played at 138 half notes per minute. Almost no one plays it that fast. Why? Beethoven wrote for a piano with a much lighter, shallower, faster action, a much sharper attack, and a much faster decay. In addition, his piano was softer, ...


4

If you are interested in more information on this, check out Charles Rosen's book, "Piano Notes". In short, in conjunction with a local provider, concert pianists pick a piano to play at the venue where they will be performing and the piano technician adjusts the piano to the liking of the performer. I have played pianos that are generally "in good ...


4

Some metric flexibility in certain pieces can make them heartstoppingly effective. The best way for you to convince yourself of this is to listen to some recordings. I will suggest two: Brahms Sonata for Cello and Piano in E minor, 2nd Movement. Contrast the Rostropovich & Serkin recording, which has quite has a quite subtle give and take with the ...


4

The time signature 6/8 is compound duple. There are 2 beats in a bar, and these are dotted crotchets (dotted quarter notes). These beats are subdivided into three pulses that are quavers (eighth notes). So if the tempo is given as a dotted crotchet = 72, this means there are 72 beats per minute, and (3x72=) 216 pulses per minute. You would set a ...


3

3/2 time gives the impression of a slower piece. 3/4 is 'normal' (whatever that is!) and 3/8 gives the impression that the piece is quicker. Only because three minims, being 'longer' notes, take twice as long to play as three crotchets. Obviously at the same bpm/tempo. But - play 3/2 at 150bpm, and it's the same end product as playing 3/4 at 75bpm. So, ...


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