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1

Are you getting your tempo value from a DAW tempo display or from a piece of sheet music? DAW tempo In most DAW software, the tempo is always in quarter notes per minute. Although DAW software and DAW users might refer to the DAW tempo values as being in BPM (beats per minute), when using a DAW like this, you have to understand that the tempo is really in ...


2

Tempo Usually the tempo is given as BPM — beats per minute. Where the tempo indication is shown as: "a note symbol that has the length of a beat, equal-sign, number (BMP)" By definition the BPM is the number of beats per minute. Putting this into an equation: "BPM" = "beats" / "time in minutes" Rearranging the ...


1

Msec = BeatsInBar * 60000 / BPM Where BeatsInBar, is, well, the number of beats in a bar, regardless of how the beat is divided: 4/4 -> BeatsInBar = 4 3/4 -> BeatsInBar = 3 9/8 -> BeatsInBar = 3 6/8 -> BeatsInBar = 2 etc.


2

In 4/16 time, the 4 is still the number of beats contained in the measure. The 16 designated the notation used to indicate one beat. In 4/4 time, "quarter notes" are used to indicate single beats; in 4/16 time, "sixteenth notes" are used to designate a single beat. The general formula would be: (60/X) * Y Z does not play a role in ...


2

As long as your playing is completely clean I'd keep on going until you reach your limit. Exercises like Hanon will help your overall dexterity especially in classical pieces. But the main thing is to make sure that you are playing extremely and completely clean. No overlapping notes, no wrong notes at all. Otherwise this will not help at all.


2

To determine if you have reasons to practice your Hanon exercises faster than the recommended tempo markings, it is helpful to consider your individual goals, and which aspects of your skills that you're trying to improve during a given practice session. Depending on your skill level, you might find that you could even double the recommended tempo, although ...


7

Generally, the bottom note (of simple time such as 3/2, 2/4, 3/4, 2/2, or 4/4), the bottom note is used to represent the beat. Compound time may be a bit more complex (but the composer ought to indicate what's wanted); times like 6/4 or 6/8 or 12/8 may indicate grouping by triplets. Sometimes the actual notes are used as in "quarter note = 120." ...


3

The most usual case is to give the tempo in the units of the bottom of the key signature. For fast tempi it might be given in multiples of that, and for very slow tempi it might be given in a subdivision. For example in 4/4: quarter=120 works well quarter=200 might be better expressed as half=100 quarter=50 might look better as eighth=100 The tempo of a ...


5

BPM stands for Beats Per Minute, so the note used in the tempo indication should have the duration of one beat. In a simple time signature like 2/4, 3/4, or 4/4, you should use a crotchet note (quarter note), because this is the duration of one beat. But in a compound time signature such as 6/8, or 9/8, or 12/8, a quaver (eight note) is the duration of a ...


7

A metronome mark doesn’t always match the bottom of a time signature, but neither should it be whatever you want. A metronome mark is most properly a number of beats per minute. So the note value used for a metronome mark should be the value taken by a beat, not an arbitrary note value. Normally the bottom of a time signature indicates the beat directly, as ...


-1

Since the lower number is supposed to denote what a 'beat' is, that should be the beat that is shown in 'bpm'. Otherwise, nothing would make sense. So your crotchet=120bpm should be ?=40bpm, in 3/4 time, I guess. Although only the composer knows what '?' represents.


2

Ableton Live records tempo changes on an automation track, but only if you have some to begin with. So first you have to create some tempo automation. Double-click on the tempo automation line to add an automation point. The line becomes a solid line, indicating that there is automation for that parameter. And there's a red dot on the project's tempo ...


1

Some composers consider Andante a 'slow' tempo and others consider it a 'fast' tempo with regard to how adverbs on it behave. A composer who regards Andante as a 'fast' tempo writes Andantino or Un poco andante to mean a tempo on the slow side of Andante, whereas a composer who regards Andante as a 'slow' tempo would write Andantino or Un poco andante to ...


1

You could write quite a long article on what different tempi (and dynamics, articulation etc.) mean to different composers. Many of our tempo indications were originally about mood or general feeling as much as about speed. "Allegro" means "happy." "Andante" means "walking." "Largo" means "wide" or &...


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