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By lifting the left or right side of a mechanical metronome you can alter the ratio of the left-to-right and right-to-left timings. The amount of sideways inclination needed to compensate for the metronome's mistakes, however, may vary with speed, so you you may find that, e.g. by placing a piece of cardboard under the right side of the metronome you can ...


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Mechanical metronomes tend to slow down as the spring runs down and the amplitude of the pendulum swing reduces. This is likely to be more significant at a slow tempo simply because the pendulum is getting fewer "pushes" per minute to keep it going. The clockwork mechanism is usually quite simple and easy to clean, but if you are tempted to try oiling it, ...


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To use an analogy, the reason you can't get from allegro to presto is probably the same reason that you can't "learn to run" by "trying to walk faster". Running and walking are not the same movements. As a kid, you probably learned to run by just "going for it," and falling over a lot until you got the hang of it - not by gradually walking faster and faster. ...


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Thanks all. After listening to the piece again, and following the tempo changes, it seems to me that Rachmaninoff is using "Tempo Precedente" after any variation that has had a change in tempo and then after that he will use "L'istesso tempo" meaning basically to "just keep going as we are". So in the context of this piece...I hear no change in tempo between ...


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...However, I am finding that I seem to be getting an eighth note tactus. Let's work with the assumption that the beat (tactus) is not the quarter note but rather the eighth note which of course will make the tempo feel faster by double. The question would seem to be why and what actually determines the pulse? When the second beat plays the repeated G at ...


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A bit of a short answer, but at the very extremes, Adam Neely has two videos on his exploration of the fastest and slowest tempi possible in music. In his endeavor, he discusses the limits of human perception: As the time between notes in a pattern becomes longer and longer, Neely finds/researches that humans stop feeling it as a pattern at around 33BPM. The ...


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Heart beat, breathing rate. Walking, running, and skipping speeds. You could probably extend that with other rates that are more physics based. The time to jump up and land, waves hitting the shore, the spring of a tree branch. Common things that oscillate in nature. IMO and experience 60-160 bpm is sort of a range of normal extremes, and I can notice a ...


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Short answer: yes, there are common metronome markings. This has to do with the tempo numbers that are usually printed on an actual physical metronome. As you progress upward in bpm, the number markings on the metronome jump, first by 2, then by 3, 4, 6, etc. My guess is that this is because proportionally, the higher on the metronome you go, the greater a ...


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Not sure that this is universal, but my go-to (Dolmetsch online) says Tempo precedente (Italian m.) previous tempo l'istesso tempo (Italian) or dasselbe Zeitmaß (German), the same time, i.e. the beat remains constant when the meter changes, so that, in the case of 2/4 to 6/8, the meter is still counted with two beats per bar (measure) but ...


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Go as fast as you like IF you're sure your playing is clean and accurate. The technique will transfer to scales etc.


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