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7

According to this Reddit post, the numbers are roughly as follows: Men: 20% Bass / 45% Baritone / 35% Tenor Women: 15% Contralto / 35% Mezzo / 50% Soprano For males, the ordering implied by these numbers agree with this statement in Merriam-Webster, which is listed under the entry for "baritone": baritone In vocal music, the voice or register ...


6

As Tim commented, warm water may loosen the grease, but for stuck woodwind joints we usually use a refrigerator or freezer. Chilling the plastic and/or grease can both shrink the joint and make the grease less adhesive. Recorders that don't have cork or thread wrapping in the joints shouldn't be greased to try to make tight joints fit. Greasing the plastic ...


6

Men's voices continue to change well into their twenties. I started off as a bass (solid E2) and ended up as a mid-high bari. There's not much point in worrying about vocal classification right now. Anyway, something's off with your octave numbers, or your labeling of vocal registers. C6 is soprano high C. There's no way you're singing that in modal ...


4

One of the beginner issues with clarinet is covering the 7 main tone holes cleanly. If your finger isn't covering it fully, the gap will act like a leaky pad. I think this is the most likely source of your problem. It could also just be a leaky pad somewhere. The side keys (especially the top two) and the G#/A keys are very common culprits. The tech ...


4

1) You will have more than one passaggi. The orientation of those passaggi will determine your fach, ultimately. 2) Physically speaking, you're still not 100% developed. If you're serious about becoming a classically trained, bel canto singer, you should be concentrating on developing your technique. I recommend reading a bit of Richard Miller ($20 tops), ...


3

When you practice you could try a focus rotation. When practicing said scale or lick, stick your metronome on and for a minute (or a fixed number of repetitions - your choice), focus on your fretting fingers, after another minute focus on your picking fingers, after another minute focus on the synchronisation between both hands, after another minute focus ...


3

I guess you'd call this style 'Contemporary Music Theatre'. Free from opera's requirement to match orchestral volume unamplified, singers often manage to integrate chest, head and falsetto into one 'voice'. Good, isn't he!


3

I’ve got a few thoughts here and will try to address everything: 1.) It is very common for men and women to speak in a different tessitura than they sing. I know men that speak high and sing low and vice versa. 2.) Typical tenor and baritone range differ by about a perfect forth, so the trouble you’re likely to have will be connecting the low end of the ...


3

Firstly, I don't know why you are experiencing "inflammation" but all I can say is stop! Anything that is causing you pain is usually bad. It sounds like you're really anxious to start singing again and are pushing too hard. If you keep pushing hard you risk damaging your voice. Realize that when you're out of practice your range shrinks and your technique ...


3

It's pretty straightforward that no-one will be able to sing all the notes found on a piano. So, one finds one's own range, and uses that.Might be an idea in the initial stages to mark a comfortable range. No trouble using chest or head voice - and even falsetto won't go amiss. Since part of the quest is recognising intervals, the octave will be a useful ...


2

'King' is a brand of saxophone made by (or imported by) the American H. N. White company. http://www.saxgourmet.com/king-saxophone-history-great-americans/ In the 1920s they were manufacturing in America. But apparently they imported a French-made model from 1960-80. I know the dates don't agree, but maybe this is what you or your teacher have partially ...


2

The range for male falsetto tends to be that of alto. A few soloists might dip into mezzosoprano ranges, but alto is quite more common. One reason is that for a usable falsetto range, you are better off with a deeper chest voice and that limits the higher range. If you want your singer to stay solidly in falsetto, you'll still want to avoid low alto range ...


2

New and Asian. Basically if you have a few design ideas and a checkbook, you can get an Asian manufacturer to make their standard issue horn with your personal modifications and your brand name. And, yes, they make some good ones. Could be something like a music shop owner in Smalltown, USA who hoped to hit the big time.


2

Assuming the instrument is in good repair, and you're covering the holes properly with your fingers, I think you just have to adjust your playing technique down to clarinet size. Speaking very broadly, you blow a sax harder than a clarinet.


2

With no keys pressed you should be producing a C#2. A C#3 should only come out if you are pressing the octave key. If the note is jumping between C#2 and C#3 you are you are biting too hard or doing something else wrong, or your instrument is leaking. It's impossible to tell without seeing you play. Here's a link to a good introduction to the saxophone ...


1

The first example uses 'tenor clef'. Still in everyday use by orchestral trombonists and cellists. Look at it as an ornate letter C, wrapped round the 4th line - it indicates that line is middle C. So the note is G above middle C. I guess I don't have to explain the bass clef? The note is A above middle C (count up the 'ladder' of ledger lines). The ...


1

The soprano recorder plays quite high notes, so the music is written an octave lower than it sounds. For tenor, it plays exactly the pitch which is shown on the music. Since the notes it plays are from middle C at the lowest, the music fits nicely on the treble clef. You can always play any treble clef soprano music - it will come out an octave lower than ...


1

It depends on the music. Normally, in sheet music intended for recorder, you play the line that has the recorder's name. For instance, many quartets are for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass recorders, and of course the tenor plays the tenor line. But if you are playing a duet that's marked soprano and alto, the tenor might well play the alto line, if it ...


1

There's generally a clear cut-off point regarding how HIGH a singer can go in chest voice. The lower limit is less well defined. I'd be surprised if a tenor COULDN'T sing in the baritione range even if he didn't feel that was where he made his best sound. But this isn't opera. There's no accepted sound that you're aiming for. Men croon, belt, scream, ...


1

First of all, let me point out that overblowing without using an octave hole or octave key Can be achieved with any wind instrument. It was actually a practice technique my clarinet teacher suggested. However, in general use of the octave key to stifle the fundamental allows you to produce the overtone (octave, 9th, whatever) with less effort and much ...


1

E5 is usually fingered with the thumbhole half opened because it speaks at lower air pressure than if you use the fingering for E4, with the thumbhole closed. The ease of playing E5 with the thumbhole closed also varies from instrument to instrument, and is perhaps especially easy on your Aulos 511. In any case, the notes above E become increasingly ...


1

It's probably more a question of a singer's range. The term bass refers roughly to a range of D above middle C down two octaves, while tenor refers to a range about a fifth higher. There's baritone between them, as well. It's not etched in stone, and some will only just fit into a particular category - we just love pigeon-holing - as the quality may waver on ...


1

Lowering the larynx is actually better as it allows for more resonance in your voice. Further, raising the larynx engages the digastric muscles (swallowing muscles), which should never be used for singing. Not only that, raising the larynx puts more strain on the throat and makes it actually harder to sing. Yes; I realize there are people that can sing ...


1

Turn away from your 'diagnosis'. It isn't any use to you. Your instrument and audience (if any) can't give you any special consideration because of it. Do you HAVE to play? Do you make your living from playing? Maybe leave it for a time and get on with other areas of your life. If playing IS your money-earner, I suggest you practice the stuff you DO ...


1

I have never had this problem with playing music, perhaps because I don't play enough, or fast enough, for it to surface. But - I am a programmer by trade and I type a great deal and very fast, with a lot of keyboard shutcuts, etc - quite similar to playing an instrument, really. I learned touch typing years ago and worked on it until I acquired the skill ...


1

I am not a voice teacher, however I do know it is not very often for a voice type to deviate by much. From what you describe, it sounds like you are likely a baritono lirico(lyric baritone) or tenore robusto(dramatic tenor). One way you may determine your passaggi(every singer has two) is to sing one note at a time, first playing the note on a piano, then ...


1

The best is and always will be conversation with a professional tutor. I can offer one bit of advice though: sirens. Starting on a note you can sing comfortably and taking up slowly until it becomes difficult is a safe way to see where you're at. But don't... force anything. If your voice has been through the wars you should stay to your comfort zone until ...


1

The previous two answers cover it. I'll just add that the curved windway has nothing to do with the difficulty of playing the bottom C. The main reason the bottom note is hard to play on Baroque recorders (assuming the factors the previous answers mention are controlled) is the strong conical bore, which favors the higher registers. A good medieval tenor ...


1

That model is a workhorse and should be capable of a decent, if not over-loud bottom note. The most common problem is the right-hand. You have to cover all the holes completely, and press the key with the little finger (finger 7) correctly also so that all holes are covered. Finger 6 - the D/d# hole, is particularly sensitive for a leak. The left-hand ...


1

It's hard to diagnose instrument playing problems over the internet. The easiest way to tell if the problem is with you or the instrument is to see if you can find a a somewhat moderately talented recorder player (one who has experience playing something other than a soprano) and ask them to play it. The lowest notes on recorders, especially larger ones, ...


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