Skip to main content
17 votes
Accepted

Is "secco" really used in piano music?

I. Examples of secco meaning "dry" or with no (or very little) pedal in piano music: Last measure of Gottschalk's Le bananier, Op.5 Piano part (m.18 and m.91) in the 4th movement (Tocata)...
DjinTonic's user avatar
  • 1,529
16 votes
Accepted

What does this “Imo” sign mean?

The first character is upper-case I, or in fact Roman numeral "one." (I see that this is the character you used in asking the question, but on my device/browser it is virtually ...
phoog's user avatar
  • 23.5k
9 votes

Is "secco" really used in piano music?

Secco does mean 'dry', so can be used just to indicate that - 'play in a dry fashion'. This could mean staccato, but generally that would be indicated using actual staccato (either the word, or the ...
James Uffindell-Birt's user avatar
4 votes

What does this “Imo” sign mean?

Yes, it is primo, made up from I and mo. In this case, the part is to be played by the 1st instrument, the 2nd has a rest. The 1st usually plays the higher notes, as indicated by the tail direction (...
Tim's user avatar
  • 195k
5 votes

Why is this image from pianochord.org for A11 labeled as an inversion, when its lowest pitch note is an A?

I'm tempted to close this question because it's simply caused by a confusing website design, but the confusion itself can be addressed: However under inversions, it shows this image I see a button ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 18.1k
4 votes

Why is this image from pianochord.org for A11 labeled as an inversion, when its lowest pitch note is an A?

Out of context, it's not possible to know the appropriate label. It could be any of the following: A7sus2sus4, A9sus4, A11(no3), E-7/A, G6/A, D6sus2sus4/A, D6-9sus4/A, D11(no3, add6)/A, D13(no3) ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 91.1k
4 votes

Inversion naming conventions

Inversions are named for their lowest-sounding notes - in other words, the answer to your first question is "a specific interval". Also, inversion naming is part of common practice music ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
  • 57.3k
2 votes

Inversion naming conventions

I think @ToddWilcox has answered your question as well as it can be answered from a technical standpoint. I however suggest you rethink the way you look at and label inversions. You seem to be ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
2 votes

What's the difference between "con brio" and "con fuoco"?

Con fuoco is literally "with fire", which I think let's you work out the feeling for yourself. "Passionately" might be a way to look at it. Con brio is "with panache" or ...
Edmund Shaw's user avatar
2 votes

Is "secco" really used in piano music?

Francis Poulenc used the corresponding French term sec very frequently in his piano writing. Here are a couple of examples - the opening of the first Improvisation FP 63: and bars 13-18 of the 7th ...
James Martin's user avatar
1 vote

Why is this image from pianochord.org for A11 labeled as an inversion, when its lowest pitch note is an A?

It looks like the confusion was caused by bad website design, having a button "show/hide inversions" which shows inversions AND VOICINGS which is a separate concept. But I'll add this anyway,...
piiperi Reinstate Monica's user avatar
1 vote

Is "secco" really used in piano music?

I believe I first came across this term in this sense in Aaron Copland's Appalachian Spring. I thought that it was applied to the piano part in one of the sections that was cut from the ballet to ...
phoog's user avatar
  • 23.5k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible