6 votes

Why is it called Camelot wheel? Why Camelot?

The round table of Camelot is often illustrated as divided into segments: (Source: Wikimedia Commons) As such, it does look superficially like the circle of fifths.
Simon B's user avatar
  • 1,881
5 votes

New tongue drum - no musical experience whatsoever - notes map?

It appears to have 15 tongues,(you reckon 14?) with numbers ranging from 1-7. That presumes there are two octaves, with say, 1 and 1, 2 and 2 being octave copies of each other, and the notes belonging ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 193k
5 votes

New tongue drum - no musical experience whatsoever - notes map?

I have a very similar (but smaller) tongue drum in C. The numbers on yours go from 1 to 7, so I'd expect a diatonic scale like mine. That's the "white keys," not a pentatonic scale, which is ...
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
3 votes

Fuzzy notes or some clearer, well-known term out there for what I mean?

EDIT for use case: When I use it later or when I change the scale that "reigns" the first occurrence of the motif, which may be its naming definition together, it cannot normaly adapt to ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
3 votes

Fuzzy notes or some clearer, well-known term out there for what I mean?

A subset of notes is a 'scale'. The notes within that scale are 'diatonic' to that scale. But, beware. Scales, modes etc. are a framework but not a restriction. Music departs from them ALL the time,...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 93k
2 votes

Fuzzy notes or some clearer, well-known term out there for what I mean?

I tried my best to understand your question, but as others have noted it's not immediately clear what you want. One way of notating things would be to first create the mapping like this, which ...
cuppajoeman's user avatar
2 votes

Multiple Notes Sung for A Single Word

It's a melisma, I'm guessing you've already found out though. I'd like to know if that's what you were talking about.
yayo's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
Accepted

What are the most elementary techniques one can implement in a motif?

I would say the elementary techniques, stated in the most generic terms, would be: repeat change In music theory that concept is often expressed as: repetition with variation If you make that a bit ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Fuzzy notes or some clearer, well-known term out there for what I mean?

If you want a term that musicians understand, then I would use "chromatic alteration." And "alteration" might hold the key to a better understanding of what's going on. Instead of ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 17.1k
1 vote

What are the most elementary techniques one can implement in a motif?

It seems to me that the phenomenon you are talking about can be described as the contrasting content of the motif. A musical motif may be characterised by a high or low contrasting content (while you ...
Michel's user avatar
  • 144

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