9

This technique has a few different names, a pyramid, bell, or cascade chord. It can be considered a classification of arpeggio since sometimes when arpeggios are played the notes are sustained. Here is an excerpt from the “Arpeggio” article in Wikipedia: A bell chord, also known colloquially as "bells", is a musical arrangement technique in which ...


6

I would probably go with the original purpose of chord symbols, which is not theoretical analysis but rather to tell the guitarist and bassist what to play, call it G7sus4/D, and not worry about it any more than that. Harmonic analysis is a subjective topic about which reasonable people can reasonably disagree, and if your main purpose is to prepare ...


6

Naming chords isn’t always an exact science, especially when they are not just a series of stacked thirds. Also, keys and modes are somewhat irrelevant to chord symbols with the exception of correct enharmonic spelling within a key (ex. F#m7 in the key of E instead of Gbm7) As for your choice #1, I understand what you mean that it sounds like a suspension of ...


4

An arpeggio is a chord played with the notes in ascending or descending order. A broken chord is a chord played such that not all pitches are sounded at the same time. In this case, it's both an arpeggio and a broken chord — both terms are appropriate to describe the music — but it also happens that each note is sung by a different voice. The multiple voices ...


4

G7sus/D is probably the most useful description. Why are you using chord symbols? As an attempt at harmonic analysis, or as an aid to sight-reading? When naming a chord results in something as complicated as Dm7(add4)(no5), isn't it simpler to just read the notes? (And anyway, as far as harmonic analysis goes, there IS a 5th, prominently repeated in the ...


3

There is no special name. They're not even inversions - unless you want to call root C6 as an inversion of Am7 1st inversion - which it obviously isn't - it's the same chord with the same voicing. The names may well show what particular function one or the other has, as far as analysis is concerned, but in a piece of musc, particularly pop, there's no ...


3

I head the D-bass and the remaining notes as distinct here. So I'd describe it as stacking an Fsus2 chord on top of D in the first bar. That also takes care for the fact that the G resolves upwards, although when it does resolve the chord is not F anymore but rather F♯o.


2

Functional analysis and voicing rules (G resolves to A) are time bound and not universal. So you are free to name the chord as you like. All we can say is that G is surely not A♭♭! Most logically seems to me to call it a secondary dominant of G e.g. like Dm is ii-V or D is V/G). (Even I know we are in D-Dorian! Thats the way I listen to it in d-Dorian as ...


2

There's two pairs of chords you're likely to come across doing this, exemplified by C6 / Am7 and Em7♭5 / Bbm6. There's no real confusion between the first two. They do different things - C6 is a tonic with a purely decorative added note, Am7 is likely to be part of a 'cycle of 5ths' sequence like Am7 - Dm7 - G7 - C. You will occasionally see a tonic C6 ...


1

I usually see the pentatonic scale degree numbers like 1 2 3 5 6. Obviously, those aren't ordinal numbers. If you want to break away from the notion that those are the numbers of a "gapped" major scale, to dispel the notion that the pentatonic scale was derived from a major scale, just think of the numbers as references to intervals above the tonic....


1

Numbers: 1 2 3 5 6 don't represent pentatonic scale degrees. They list 5 pitches of a major scale used in the specific pentatonic scale – major pentatonic in this case. In jazz/pop nomenclature major (ionian) scale is a typically used reference, so e.g. a scale commonly called minor pentatonic has pitches 1 b3 4 5 b7. There are some other conventions, e.g. ...


1

The term arpeggio gets used in two ways, as a type of embellishment of a chord represented by the ways line... ...and also to mean playing the tones of a chord separately in a line... The second mean is often called arpeggiation - as a process, like in composition - and sometimes it's called broken chord. The embellishment is normally played from bottom up,...


1

Yes there is indeed a term for this. This is a very interesting phenomenon of harmony. You have described it well, the same grouping of tones can be interpreted as two different chords depending on how we organize the tones in our mind. Just to make sure we are on the same page. An example could be the following two chords: F-A-C-D D-F-A-C The first chord ...


1

...Minor 6th chord containing the exact same notes as the Minor 7th Flat 5 AKA Half Diminished 7th chord but are in different root positions... Not different "root positions" I think you're looking for the terms "inversion." A min6 chord and min7b5 chord can be inversions of each other. It's funny you brought up the word "root" ...


1

This is kind of an abstract meta-answer... feel free to downvote. Musical notation is a form of written language about musical ideas from people to people. Who is your target audience? How do they interpret what you're saying with the notation? I understand your question so that you're having problems even yourself - none of the chords symbols you could ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible