7

They are called voices, and according to the Finale web site, Finale Notepad has a "layer" system for writing multiple voices. https://usermanuals.finalemusic.com/NotePad2012Win/Content/NotePad/Multiple_Voices.htm Here's an example picture from some other answer The red circle highlights how notes overlap.


6

I personally call rhythmic patterns like that systematically according to the number of rhythmic pulses in each note. This one would be 3-3-3-3-4. Other examples are 3-3-2 and 3-1, which are common bass and kick drum patterns for faking many sorts of Latin-American and African rhythms. If the pattern starts with a rest, I write it in parentheses, but I don't ...


3

I’d like to add that if you are notating this rhythm it should be done this way for clarity and ease of sight reading. Here are 16th and 8th note versions: This is a fairly common rhythm. The most prominent use of it is in this recording by Sammy Davis Jr. although it is played staccato on that recording. It is also used in ...


3

Keep a practice book. In it goes: A log of your practice sessions, with what you practiced, where you think you did well, and where you need more work. Example: "20 minutes of major scales, by 4ths, at 120 BPM. Needs more work at this speed before going faster. Notes about where you left off in an instructional book: "Up to page 22 of the intro ...


2

There are several terms that I've heard: Modal mixture is a term used in jazz to describe borrowing chords from a different mode of the same tonic. Modal interchange is another term for it Parallel scales can be used for any scales that share the same tonic. Pitch axis is used by some guitarists, particularly in metal/shred. In my opinion this is a ...


2

“Es” is definitely “la” (B) the relative minor of “do” (D) and is also the tonic since this is all in B minor. However, that syllable is used only for marking the beginning of phrases on downbeats with a bass note. When he plays his final “la” notes in the melody they are an octave higher and one or two are harmonized with a lower octave and/or a 5th. It’s ...


1

The marking simile or sim. instructs the performer to continue to play something in the same way (in a similar way, I guess is the easiest way to remember this translation from Italian). For instance, a bar or passage of music may have staccato markings over each note; a marking of simile over the following notes would tell you to continue to play staccato. ...


1

There is no special name given to this 4:3 relationship. It is an example of cross rhythm. Cross-rhythm refers to systemic polyrhythm. The New Harvard Dictionary of Music states that cross-rhythm is: "A rhythm in which the regular pattern of accents of the prevailing meter is contradicted by a conflicting pattern and not merely a momentary displacement ...


1

the harmony in this bar is Eb (respective to your earlier posting) the note F is an appoggiatura resolving to the 3rd (G) - in common practice it was on the beat but - in pop and jazz it is ahead of the beat: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appoggiatura


1

Fundamentally, it's a passing tone, but with a delayed resolution. There's no "official" music theory term for this.


1

Melodic density, while not a "term of art", would be generally understood to mean as you intend. In 1962, Milton Babbitt coined the term time-point interval, which can be used to describe the linear density of pitch onsets. A time point is the instantaneous moment at which a note begins (its onset). The time-point interval is the distance between ...


1

I don't know of a specific term for this, but I think your recommendation of "modal shift" is a pretty good one. In any event, I would recommend against using the term "modulation," since it really necessitates a change of tonic pitch. And since your piece is explicitly monotonal (that is, "having a single tonic pitch"), ...


1

Berklee College of Music uses the term "Extended Dominants" in their harmony curriculum. Extended Dominants: A series of dominants without a direct key relationship, each one resolving down a fifth to the next. source: https://college.berklee.edu/core/glossary.html


1

The "trio" which is common in marches (and polkas) is generally a final section in a contrasting key. In major keys, it's usually in the subdominant of the opening key (not always.) It's called a trio for historical reasons. In many baroque (and maybe earlier) suites, some dances had a part traditionally played by three instruments. The polacca ...


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