9

As others have mentioned, the word diatonic comes from ancient Greek music theory and literally means "through [whole] tones." Ancient Greek music tuned its scales using intervals of perfect fourths called tetrachords. A diatonic tetrachord was one that was tuned with two whole tones on the top, and the remainder left on the bottom (roughly a semitone), ...


7

According to my trusty 'bible' - aka 'Oxford Companion to Music' - Diatonic scales are the major and minor, made up of tones and semitones, (inc. +2 in the harmonic minor) as distinct from the chromatic scales, made entirely of semitones. Thus the modes are also diatonic. Diatonic passages, intervals, chords and harmonies, all constructed from the notes ...


6

The general way that this is used is "using only notes which can be found in one of the major scales". I think most people would take issue with Brittanica about the pentatonic - the pentatonic scale is a subset of a major scale, and therefore is diatonic, at least in my reasoning. (Whole tone is not though.) A diatonic instrument is only capable of ...


6

The definition that I've seen most often (composition, harmony, analysis, counterpoint, and form books for the most part) relates to the Common Practice Period key structure. Some extension are made to earlier forms. (I don't remember seeing the term used much for post-romantic music.) In major keys, "diatonic" refers to melodies and harmonies using notes ...


4

Diatonic is each scale you can play equal to the scales with the white keys. So any other mode that can be fitted in a same pattern of 5 whole tone steps and 2 half tone steps arranged in the same way as the white keys of a keyboard is diatonic. This means: all scales like wwhwwwh, whwwwhw, hwwwhww, wwwhwwh, wwhwwhw, whwwhww, hwwhwww, will always have a ...


3

I agree with the Encyclopedia Britannica in restricting the definition of diatonic and chromatic to within the Western heptatonic scales. The way the Wikipedia article opposes diatonic and chromatic in different applications also makes sense to me. This distinction evolved at the interface of when melody gave rise to harmony in the Western context, as key-...


3

I think Pensato and Melodic Expectation may indeed be what you're looking for. Maybe also look into Ghost Notes (although they are more muted notes so they are "actually there"). The idea behind the missing notes, I think, is to - after the melody has been established - engage the brain of the listener even more by having it fill in the blanks and maybe ...


2

Historically, the idea to identify pitch with a letter or solfege name is part of an idea called: gamut. But I think that meaning is really a reference to the whole set in connection with diatonic pitches. The modern term for a pitch and it's related higher and lower octaves is: pitch class. D♭ is not a separate tone (it is one of the possible ...


2

I agree that there is a lack of a good term. Note is a poor choice, not only because, as you say, "notes have pitch, not the opposite," but notes also have duration. If asked, "what are the notes?" You could just as easily answer, "whole notes, half notes, quarter notes..." as "A, B, C..." I don't think there is a formal term, though "note letters", "white ...


2

Hi and welcome to the music stack exchange. The term that best describes the phenomenon to which your question refers is misinterpretation. Examining the songs that you reference, both the beat and the tempo are fairly straightforward... There is nothing out of the ordinary as far as how the beat or tempo can be quantified; at least according to music ...


2

Traditionally, the producer is the artist who makes the beat (the instrumental) of a song. The MC is the person who raps over that beat. Wikipedia has it written as: "Hip hop as a general rule consists of two elements: an instrumental track (the "beat") and a vocal track (the "rap"). The artist who crafts the beat is the producer (or beatmaker), and the ...


2

I would say the Wiki definition is incorrect in that it describes the snare position as an "upbeat." It's a downbeat, which means it's on one of the four beats to the bar (in 4/4 time). An upbeat can be anything not on one of the four, but it's subjective: In a 16-division bar, one could say divisions 1, 5, 9 and 13 are "down" and everything else is "up." Or ...


1

Looks like it might be an anacrusis to the chorus that is also part of the verse. There may be no term for it at all, but if there is its probably poetry related.


1

It's kind of like an elision where the end of one phrase is the beginning of the next phrase. The verb is elide. In music elision is specifically about the notes overlapping in phrases. But, there is a general meaning for elision as some kind of overlapping or omission. This may not be the correct usage for elision, but it's the word that came immediately ...


1

The vernacular term is Note. Regardless of technical nuances, all musicians know what "note" means in the context you are referring to. IMO nothing more is necessary. Another term, not particularly technical, that you'll find in the introduction to every theory book, is Musical Alphabet, when referring to the group at large. However Musical Alphabet ...


1

I always thought of them as synonyms, but googling around found that some people see them as different, with the distinctions changing depending on who you ask. Is there a formal distinction between them? If so, what's the difference? Well, people are applying the term "arpeggio" in different ways and that gives food for different thoughts on the ...


1

My first time here, hope I am ok in posting this. Is there a specific name for the kind of broken arpeggio formed when the tones in a chord are played in a regularly alternating pattern, such as an ascending 1538 etc ? This is what is produced by what flat pickers call “crosspicking”. I am also a little puzzled about all the fuss made about whether the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible