33

... part of the violin family... Actually, as baroque violists love to point out, during the early evolution of these instruments, both violin and cello were part of the viola family. The viola was the default instrument, the violino was the "little" version (adding the diminutive suffix -ino), and the violone was the "big" version. ...


28

That's weird... apparently there's no English term for this exact phenomenon, but there is one in German: Einschwingvorgang (pronounced eyn-shving-fore-gung). Wikipedia wants to have it translated with transient, but I disagree. A literal translation would be “oscillation start process”, i.e. it describes the start of an oscillation which then just goes on, ...


19

tl;dr It's violoncello. Language considerations Lots of classical music words usually have a specific language as their origins (mostly Italian), so, unless an extended literature can confirm standard spelling practice that altered the original word in other languages (that's how languages evolve), the original spelling is to be considered as the proper one: ...


18

Certainly, electronic instruments have timbre. Every audible sound does! The aspects of timbre that are measurable and quantifiable can be measured and quantified for all sounds. One of the most common ways of looking at timbre quantifiably is by doing a Fourier analysis, creating a chart of energy at different frequencies and how that changes over time. ...


14

I’m not sure if there a conventional term for it but from a waveform standpoint the term would be that it has a slow attack and low transient. Another instrument with a similar characteristic would be a cello when bowed. As opposed to instruments with a fast attack (I.e. guitar, piano, drum) Transient sometimes referring to the initial burst of energy from ...


13

Is it accurate to say synths have timbre? Yes. an identical note played on piano versus a cello can epitomize timbre whereby the material and playing method of the instruments can be heard to be distinct. We do not hear the material or the playing method of an instrument directly. We hear vibrations in the air that are set in motion by the instrument. ...


12

This is called Tresillo. It's a 3+3+2 rhythm: for example, X: 1 T: Tresillo K: none M: 2/4 L: 1/16 V:V1 staff=perc stafflines=1 B3B- B2B2 :| It originates in sub-Saharan Africa, and is very common in Cuban and Latin American music. Here's the first measure of the song so you can see it in context: X: 1 T: Kamouraska K: none M: 4/4 L: 1/16 %%staves {(RH) (LH)...


12

The diatonic modes — ionian, dorian, ..., locrian — don't apply to octatonic scales. So for any given octatonic scale, the first mode, for example, is not "ionian" (unless you develop your own naming system, in which case you could call the remaining modes whatever you like). Generally, the first mode is just "the first mode", and so ...


11

The black keys on the piano are exactly what you said, pentatonic scales. Which scale it is depends on what you use as your tonic or focus note. You mentioned G♭, the black keys are a G♭ (or F♯) major pentatonic scale. Add the white keys C♭ (B) and F and you have a full blown G♭ major scale. The pentatonic scale removes the 4th and 7th degrees of the major ...


10

Because this song has simple rhythms and there are only two eighth notes in the entire song there is no need to count the “and” for the entire song but there is nothing wrong with counting all the “ands” if it makes you more comfortable and helps you play the song correctly. Your idea of just counting the “and” for bar 13 is a good one. The rhythm in that ...


10

The term "accidental" comes from the (probably Medieval) Latin "accidentem" meaning "outside the usual state of affairs" or "by chance" and appeared in music in the 1400s. from "Online Etymological Dictionary" The term "accidental" often indicates that a property is not essential to the discussion....


10

The most common term is tonicization. For example: Tonicization is the process of making a non-tonic chord temporarily sound like tonic (SOURCE) In music, tonicization is the treatment of a pitch other than the overall tonic (the "home note" of a piece) as a temporary tonic in a composition. (SOURCE) Tonicization occurs when a chord or short ...


10

However, if the assumption above is correct, the octavi toni would end up in Ionian mode. As you've probably deduced, the assumption is incorrect. In fact, this question is based on a couple of incorrect assumptions. The first is the identity of the first mode, which is Dorian, not Ionian. Ionian didn't even exist when the modes were initially numbered ...


9

This is called 'imitation'. Imitation is the repetition of a melody in a polyphonic texture shortly after its first appearance in a different voice. The melody may vary through transposition, inversion, or otherwise, but retain its original character. The intervals and rhythms of an imitation may be exact or modified. [Wikipedia] In a Jazz context a ...


9

This technique has a few different names, a pyramid, bell, or cascade chord. It can be considered a classification of arpeggio since sometimes when arpeggios are played the notes are sustained. Here is an excerpt from the “Arpeggio” article in Wikipedia: A bell chord, also known colloquially as "bells", is a musical arrangement technique in which ...


8

Samuel Adler's – The Study of Orchestration describes this as a "Cutout Score", providing the example below [p. 761] :


8

@Timinycricket has it right: slow attack / fast attack. The terms are relative, not exact. Here is some supplementary information. To describe a gong, or other instrument's sound, the closest musical term is timbre, and the acoustical term is sound envelope. There are (were) at least two timbre-based taxonomies of musical instruments: The eight-fold ...


8

I think you're talking about the 'truck driver' modulation. PLay it, then play it again, up one step! A composing/arranging technique more than an orchestration one. https://www.musical-u.com/learn/the-truck-drivers-gear-shift/ Here's a fun take-off of the technique!


8

**Intervals have two parts to them. One part is how many semitones there are between the two notes in question, the other is what note names they have been given. That sounds a little strange to most, on first being told, but it's a necessity. Scales have little or nothing to do with naming intervals. But read on... Your minor second: C>D is a major ...


8

Keep in mind: I am not a vocal coach. Although I believe strongly that what I have written is true, I don't have references for this. This may not all be technically, historically, or anatomically accurate, so take what I say with a grain of salt - especially if you're trying to learn this. Get an instructor or risk permanently damaging your voice. After ...


7

Interesting. I think the problem lies in a pretty poor definition. As you've said, there are all kinds of ways to understand "intensity," so it's not hard to come up with examples that seem to defy the definition. It seems that they mean "intensity" as something like "tendency to resolve towards tonic," but presumably the tonic ...


7

Call and response or antiphony means some kind of trading of musical statements back and forth between players or ensembles. But when you mention repetition of lyrics you probably should also know the term refrain which is a stanza or line of poetry (lyrics) repeated, like the title in the song The Times They Are A-Changin. Call and response in most cases ...


7

In synthesis, the magic letters ADSR get bandied around a lot. They represent a sound envelope, which every sound, particularly musical instruments, have. They're the basic breakdown of a sound. Every sound will start somewhere! That's the Attack part. It may be immediate, as in a snare drum, or stridently played violin note, or slow, as in a swelled note on ...


7

You would call it a pentatonic scale. You are centering it around G flat, so it's specifically a major pentatonic scale. It depends how you work the melody, but lots of pentatonic melodies "work" because the scale can be thought of as outlining a tonic chord with two auxiliary notes, one a whole step above the tonic and another a whole step above ...


7

They are called voices, and according to the Finale web site, Finale Notepad has a "layer" system for writing multiple voices. https://usermanuals.finalemusic.com/NotePad2012Win/Content/NotePad/Multiple_Voices.htm Here's an example picture from some other answer The red circle highlights how notes overlap.


7

If you consult a monolingual Italian dictionary (e.g. Devoto-Oli), you'll find that violoncello derives from viola plus an augmentative suffix (accrescitivo in Italian, abbreviated acc.) (i.e., a "big viola"). Treccani online will confirm: violoncèllo s. m. [der. di viola2]. (Derivation of viola2) (Note: the è does not appear in the written word--...


6

What Zarlino (by way of the Greeks) is talking about is proportions of small integers. The octave, for example, has a ratio of 2:1; the fifth 3:2. Zarlino is arguing that since the fourth has a ratio of 4:3, it, too, like the fifth and octave, should be considered a consonance. So even though other intervals are "rational" in the modern ...


6

In this song, counting 1 2 3 4 in each bar will work just fine. You will reach a stage when you won't even need to count that, you'll just feel it. On the bar in question, most would count 1 2 3 4&, obviously the 1 2 3 4 will remain at the same pulse as they did in all the other bars. Don't see the need for all the & counts, but if it helps, there's ...


6

I personally call rhythmic patterns like that systematically according to the number of rhythmic pulses in each note. This one would be 3-3-3-3-4. Other examples are 3-3-2 and 3-1, which are common bass and kick drum patterns for faking many sorts of Latin-American and African rhythms. If the pattern starts with a rest, I write it in parentheses, but I don't ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible