30

It doesn't seem... that "music theory predicts what is good music" I agree. And why would it? That's not what theories are there for at all. Like, the theory of Newtonian mechanics isn't there for judging what kind of behaviour of stuff in the real world is good behaviour or bad behaviour – that's not for physicists to judge, the world is just as ...


28

That's weird... apparently there's no English term for this exact phenomenon, but there is one in German: Einschwingvorgang (pronounced eyn-shving-fore-gung). Wikipedia wants to have it translated with transient, but I disagree. A literal translation would be “oscillation start process”, i.e. it describes the start of an oscillation which then just goes on, ...


14

You seem to take it for granted that we use twelve half-tones per octave, construct scales from seven of these half-tones, stack thirds into chords, arrange these chords into progressions, etc... and that all seems trivial to you. It is not. (Western) music theory describes how to pick a very small subset of all the frequencies you could generate on musical ...


14

I’m not sure if there a conventional term for it but from a waveform standpoint the term would be that it has a slow attack and low transient. Another instrument with a similar characteristic would be a cello when bowed. As opposed to instruments with a fast attack (I.e. guitar, piano, drum) Transient sometimes referring to the initial burst of energy from ...


13

It means they expect the musical choices to display different aspects of piano technique. For example, the Level 3 list (page 35) contains "Arabesque" by Johann Burgmüller (SCORE) "Allegro in A Major" by Johann Hässler (SCORE) "Morning Prayer" by Cornelius Gurlitt (SCORE) "Arabesque" and "Allegro" are ...


13

Yes and no. It mostly depends on the age in which the genre was born, but it should be noted that some labels often used as "genres" are more vague "instrumentation-based" (and, technically, not actual genres): it's pretty obvious that "Opera" requires singers, "Symphonic" can't be played by a percussion duo, and "...


12

Transcription: Is the process of listening to a piece of music and "reverse engineering" it. It can also mean just the process of writing down a piece of music. You'll find a number of questions on this site related to transcription. As a starting point, just search for the word "transcribe" or for the transcription tag. EDIT: ...


12

I would argue that this E7 is still a secondary dominant, just one that resolves deceptively. This E7 is V7/vi in the key of C, and it resolves to F, thus VI/vi. In other words, we have a V–VI progression in the temporary key of A minor (vi of C major). If we're in C major and we have a G7 that resolves to A minor, do we still call this G7 a dominant? I ...


12

KV is an abbreviation for Köchel-Verzeichnis, which translates to "Köchel catalogue." It is the commonly accepted listing of Mozart's works, originally developed by Ludwig von Köchel in 1862. Its goal is to list all of Mozart's compositions in chronological order. A complete listing can be found on Wikipedia. One can find similar abbreviations for ...


12

This is called Tresillo. It's a 3+3+2 rhythm: for example, X: 1 T: Tresillo K: none M: 2/4 L: 1/16 V:V1 staff=perc stafflines=1 B3B- B2B2 :| It originates in sub-Saharan Africa, and is very common in Cuban and Latin American music. Here's the first measure of the song so you can see it in context: X: 1 T: Kamouraska K: none M: 4/4 L: 1/16 %%staves {(RH) (LH)...


11

It's a broad generalization that discussion of "music theory" usually refers to Common Practice Tonality, or related ideas of scales, chords, modes, and so forth. These ideas are primarily descriptive and often subjective in their application. However, there are music theories currently being studied and developed that attempt more objective/...


11

I would argue that it's a question of levels. In other words, the confusion is caused due to the different hierarchical levels of the meter (the eighth-note level and the measure level). You're correct that the 2+2+3 pattern, when we focus on that eighth-note level of a 7/8 measure, doesn't necessarily suggest any "normal accents [that] reoccur ...


11

This is a little complex to answer, because "dominant" has been used to mean different things over time. In the (late) Middle Ages, "dominant" actually just meant "reciting tone," which would be a fifth above the final of authentic modes and a fourth above the final for plagal modes. The first appearance of "mediant" ...


11

The black keys on the piano are exactly what you said, pentatonic scales. Which scale it is depends on what you use as your tonic or focus note. You mentioned G♭, the black keys are a G♭ (or F♯) major pentatonic scale. Add the white keys C♭ (B) and F and you have a full blown G♭ major scale. The pentatonic scale removes the 4th and 7th degrees of the major ...


10

Ievan Polkka There are two things happening here: In the preceding section, the left hand is playing pairs of notes simultaneously. However, beginning at 2:03, the left hand plays broken chords. Broken chords, also called arpeggios, are when notes forming a single unit (a chord) are played individually. The right hand plays the melody with ornamentation, ...


10

What you're hearing I would consider as added beats rather than missing ones. The general term for how beats are grouped is meter. Meter is the pattern of strong and weak pulses that underlie the music -- the places where you might clap along. All genres of Western music tend to have a regular meter throughout the piece; however, in more contemporary music (&...


10

The general term for a repeating bass figure is ostinato. It is rare to see a bass line moving in steady sixteenth notes, but it is very common to see bass lines moving at steady pulses in other notes values: wholes notes, half notes, quarter notes, and eighth notes. You mention that the notes are played quickly, so I'll focus on the last two notes values. A ...


10

Because this song has simple rhythms and there are only two eighth notes in the entire song there is no need to count the “and” for the entire song but there is nothing wrong with counting all the “ands” if it makes you more comfortable and helps you play the song correctly. Your idea of just counting the “and” for bar 13 is a good one. The rhythm in that ...


10

The term "accidental" comes from the (probably Medieval) Latin "accidentem" meaning "outside the usual state of affairs" or "by chance" and appeared in music in the 1400s. from "Online Etymological Dictionary" The term "accidental" often indicates that a property is not essential to the discussion....


10

The most common term is tonicization. For example: Tonicization is the process of making a non-tonic chord temporarily sound like tonic (SOURCE) In music, tonicization is the treatment of a pitch other than the overall tonic (the "home note" of a piece) as a temporary tonic in a composition. (SOURCE) Tonicization occurs when a chord or short ...


10

However, if the assumption above is correct, the octavi toni would end up in Ionian mode. As you've probably deduced, the assumption is incorrect. In fact, this question is based on a couple of incorrect assumptions. The first is the identity of the first mode, which is Dorian, not Ionian. Ionian didn't even exist when the modes were initially numbered ...


9

The leitmotif (or Leitmotiv in German) is a tremendously misunderstood concept. I risk adding just another answer, but I wanted to clear up some common confusions: The term leitmotif was in use during Wagner's lifetime; von Wolzogen's first "guide" was published in 1878, two years after the first Bayreuth Festival (and first performance of the full ...


9

This is called 'imitation'. Imitation is the repetition of a melody in a polyphonic texture shortly after its first appearance in a different voice. The melody may vary through transposition, inversion, or otherwise, but retain its original character. The intervals and rhythms of an imitation may be exact or modified. [Wikipedia] In a Jazz context a ...


8

Instead of looking at it as a flat root note, you can think of it as a major seventh, which is present in the harmonic minor scale. In your first example, that would be E F♯ G A B C D♯ E You can see that notes of both the B major and E minor chords are present. With a sharp 6th, it can also be a melodic minor scale: E F♯ G A B C♯ D♯ E Both scales do miss ...


8

@Timinycricket has it right: slow attack / fast attack. The terms are relative, not exact. Here is some supplementary information. To describe a gong, or other instrument's sound, the closest musical term is timbre, and the acoustical term is sound envelope. There are (were) at least two timbre-based taxonomies of musical instruments: The eight-fold ...


8

I think you're talking about the 'truck driver' modulation. PLay it, then play it again, up one step! A composing/arranging technique more than an orchestration one. https://www.musical-u.com/learn/the-truck-drivers-gear-shift/ Here's a fun take-off of the technique!


7

We typically classify these chords by what their bass notes do. Thus a passing six-four is so named because the bass functions as a passing note; the same is true for the arpeggiating six-four. Your auxiliary six-four is also often called a "pedal" six-four, and once again that term describes the bass. The cadential six-four, a subset of this pedal ...


7

Yes, you could take a bar of 3/4 (a time signature that implies Simple Triple meter) and divide each quarter note into triplets. If you did this consistently there would be a good argument for calling the meter 'Compound Triple' - and for re-writing it as 9/8. If you're going to sub-divide in 2, choose 3/4. If you're going to sub-divide in 3, choose 9/8. ...


7

The use of the terms pitched and unpitched is perfectly adequate to distinguish between these types of material.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible