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0

I'm fairly certain it started with an "S" as well. Now I realize that you subsequently realized that the word didn't start with S, but I would add this to Todd Wilcox's answer suggesting bridge: According to Wikipedia's article on Bar form, the beginning of the Abgesang was known by the Meistersinger as the Steg, which in modern German denotes a ...


0

Transposing is moving whole passages up a certain interval. The singer cannot sing the passage in E Major so you transpose it a diminished fifth up to the key of Bb. Transcribing is related to Transposing. Here you find a violin piece written in the treble clef, but you want to play it on your Viola, but you don't auctually want to change the pitches. So you ...


0

The word "modulation" isn't so much the problem (see my comment to another answer) as that there are degrees of tonal change. A simple II7-V7-I probably didn't really modulate to the dominant key. Tovey discusses the difference between cadencing "in" a key and cadencing "on" a note. A chord pattern like I-IV-I-I7-iv-II7-V ...


2

The main issue which I think people have missed here is two-fold. Firstly was it a mistake? And secondly; is it indicative of a lack of musical notation and/or theoretical knowledge? Let me explain what I think the two possibilities are as I see them: Firstly, the contributor may be auto-didactorily taught! So many learn from YouTube these days; notation isn'...


5

The simplest way to describe it would be to use its bar number. As for an actual name of this kind of incomplete bar; I don’t know of one. Incidentally, a pickup bar at the beginning of a piece is bar 0.


1

The general term seems to be "mouth resonator instruments", but this is an informal rather than a taxonomic term. In addition to the Jew's harp and nose whistle, there are various mouth-resonated string bows (Britannica: Mouth Bow; SoundsOfAngkor: Mouth Resonator Fiddle)) It should be mentioned that the oral cavity is not the primary resonator for ...


-1

Yes, this is 'recitative'. A very common device in through-composed opera. Some styles of Musical Theatre are plays with songs - in-between the musical 'numbers' the story is told in normal spoken dialogue. Opera prefers to set the dialogue to music too! But a lyrical aria is better suited to illustrating an emotion than to progressing the plot! You ...


1

I try a more didactic approach to answer the questions: An "open string" vibrates over its full length. The string is shortened by stopping it, meaning to press it down with a finger at a given place. Then only the part between the finger and the bow will vibrate. Between A and C# are 4 semitones; this is already stated in your quote. Musicians ...


1

I assumed the OP's question could be reworded as "what timbre will I get if my score calls for a synthesizer?" Pianos and human voices are predictable; organs (pipe / tonewheel / subtractive / clonewheel) are less so; and with a synthesizer, the sky's the limit. There have been efforts in the past to come up with a "standard" voice ...


3

The "unstopped" length means the longest vibrating length of the string, known as the "open" string. Other pitches are produced by pressing ("stopping") the string at various points along its length. The number of notes between A and C# (inclusive) is 5: A A# B C C#. 2^(-1/12) approx. equals 0.944. The real question is: why is ...


13

Is it accurate to say synths have timbre? Yes. an identical note played on piano versus a cello can epitomize timbre whereby the material and playing method of the instruments can be heard to be distinct. We do not hear the material or the playing method of an instrument directly. We hear vibrations in the air that are set in motion by the instrument. ...


18

Certainly, electronic instruments have timbre. Every audible sound does! The aspects of timbre that are measurable and quantifiable can be measured and quantified for all sounds. One of the most common ways of looking at timbre quantifiably is by doing a Fourier analysis, creating a chart of energy at different frequencies and how that changes over time. ...


1

"Reggae" was suggested in comments. I think that would be the reggae "skank" rhythm of staccato, repeated eighth notes, or staccato quarter notes on beats 2 and 4. But, reggae isn't just a rhythm pattern. Harmonically this example is nothing like reggae. I think this pattern could be found in too many contexts to give it a clear label. ...


3

A temperament is what you get when you compromise the tuning of a keyboard or fretted string instrument to "fix" the out of tune intervals that result from tuning other intervals "purely" or "justly," that is, tuning the two pitches so a harmonic of one coincides with a harmonic of the other. A temperament is a kind of tuning ...


1

They are often used interchangeably, but they are technically different. Tuning system is a broad term meaning any system of tuning an instrument. Temperament is a set of adjustments (temperaments) to a tuning system to meet specific musical requirements. For example, "just intonation" is a tuning system involving "pure" intervals. &...


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