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The easiest way to do this would to write "Play twice" at the top.


2

As so often, there's no tidy yes/no answer to your question, but it's interesting to consider the various ways a musician might use the term 'noise'. 'Noise' might mean random sound. Or a definitely UN-random mix of frequencies such White Noise or Pink Noise. Or a randomisation of digital values applied as 'dithering'. Or simply unwanted sound. There's ...


9

I think when an instrument doesn't have a clear pitch, the musician's go-to word is 'unpitched', rather than 'noise'. Noise in a musical context often refers to something extraneous or unwanted - e.g. when talking about fret noise, or a noisy amp. However, you are quite right that the sound of many drums is essentially very like 'enveloped noise' - and from ...


3

Typically sympathetic resonance generates more copies of the same harmonics or fundamental tones, not new tones in between as your post suggests. I can think of one or two phenomenon that would describe this but I'd surprised if you can hear these if the notes are not close together (e.g. maj or min 2nd). When two harmonic waves (i.e. notes) are played ...


2

This sounds like an instance of sympathetic resonance (also call sympathetic vibrations), but in my experience the extra frequency we hear tends to be above the two that you are playing, not in between them. In short, each given pitch has its own harmonic series; think of these as additional pitches that you can't really actively hear. (Beware: this is a ...


3

In Italy we usually refer to the names of the notes using the solmisation Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si (the Ti name as a variant for Si is very uncommon in Italy). Jazz musicians probably are more accustomed to the letter names for notes than, say, folk singers or classical musicians, and may use both standards. When it comes to violin and you want to refer to the ...


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I kind of have the same thing! Except I don't fumble and I don't need to have heard the song recently, I can sing a song I heard like 5+ years ago in the correct key without skipping a beat. But I can't name the pitch, so I feel like it's not perfect pitch. For instance, if someone played me an A on a piano I almost always would guess the note wrong. If i ...


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The Main Characteristics of Romantic Music https://www.rpfuller.com/gcse/music/romantic.html Freedom of form and design. It was more personal and emotional. Song-like melodies (lyrical), as well as many chromatic harmonies and discords. Dramatic contrasts of dynamics and pitch. Big orchestras, due mainly to brass and the invention of the valve. Wide ...


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Let me try to unpack the quotation a bit. Romantic characteristics: "Chromatic expansion": more possibilities for use of chromaticism, in context, I think this refers mostly to harmonic patterns (like chromatic chord progressions you wouldn't generally find in Bach or Mozart, for example) "Development of striking elaborations of linear tonal syntax": "...


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Authentic cadence is always from V -> I. Imperfect cadence is one that inverts the V or I in some way. So for example vi -> II is an imperfect cadence since vi is the inversion of V and II is the inversion of I. Reference: https://www.solfej.io/blog/cadences/


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