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How to execute an accent is the question? It is quite common to say 'hit it hard' but the result is a hard articulation which transfers from tongue to throat resulting in a distorted and brittle sound. A good analogy is making a fast descrescendo using the wind, wind being the focus of the articulation. This will result in a clearer non-distorted accent, ...


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Just in addition to Richard's and Aaron's answers I'd like to propose to read the 2 wiki articles about the sonata form and the history of the sonata form and the added links (references). Both articles confirm the elements of contrast like feminin/masculin and the aspect of dramatic. Thus, it was thought by Marx that the first theme should be "...


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I just found this in The Definitive Guide To Music Notation (2016) p.190, which is quite specific about a difference: As I imagined, working backwards from a multi-measure G.P. as logically indicating a precise total time, a G.P. with a single measure would also be one exactly measure. With reference to the Italian alternative, vuota, the Riccordi ...


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TL;DR G.P. = "Be very, very quiet. Nobody else is playing here either." But says nothing about the duration of the rest, which is as notated. Fermata = Extend the rest beyond its notated value. Some definitions from authoritative sources: caesura A term sometimes used interchangeably with 'pause' to indicate a note that is held for longer than ...


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G.P. and a fermata have entirely different meanings. OnMusic Dictionary is wrong. G.P. (or the Italian "vuota") is a courtesy indication that nobody is playing. In the absence of any indication to the contrary the tempo continues. G.P. is mostly only marked in the orchestra parts, the conductor can see from the score that everybody has rests. A ...


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Given only the isolated quotation, there is another interpretation that complements @Richard's. By "merely lyrical", I understand Cohrs to be saying that themes can be both lyrical (i.e., melodic) and ... have other additional qualities that serve as compositional material. In the Bruckner case, the themes are "merely" (i.e., "only&...


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There isn't such a generalized term in music. If you don't want to use one of the common expression or instruction phrases just write what you want in English. For example: "dampen the string gradually." Personally, I would not be too specific unless it really, really mattered. For example: "gradually dampen string over whole note until barely ...


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As other answers have pointed out the etymology of the instrument's name shows that "violoncello" is correct, not violincello, and the "o" spelling is correct in English, Italian, French and German. There are a number of references to "violincello", but most can be explained as spelling or typographical errors. The Bartleby ...


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In company with my two comments, I'd suggest there is one typographical convention that can clearly convey an ongoing, progressive change: a series of dashes or underscores. This can help clarify intentions: Imagine, printing "cresc." in measure 5 and "dim." in measure 10. Should we continue growing louder and louder through those 5 ...


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I'm under the impression that you're looking for consistent, absolute and specific indications of possible ranges. Well, that is mostly pointless in the common sense of music: while mostly based on math and logic, we all know that music is way beyond all of that. Remember that music is not what is written on a score, but what is played by performers (just ...


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tl;dr It's violoncello. Language considerations Lots of classical music words usually have a specific language as their origins (mostly italian), so, unless an extended literature can confirm standard spelling practice that altered the original word in other languages (that's how languages evolve), the original spelling is to be considered as the proper one: ...


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If you consult a monolingual Italian dictionary (e.g. Devoto-Oli), you'll find that violoncello derives from viola plus an augmentative suffix (accrescitivo in Italian, abbreviated acc.) (i.e., a "big viola"). Treccani online will confirm: violoncèllo s. m. [der. di viola2]. (Derivation of viola2) (Note: the è does not appear in the written word--...


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... part of the violin family... Actually, as baroque violists love to point out, during the early evolution of these instruments, both violin and cello were part of the viola family. The viola was the default instrument, the violino was the "little" version (adding the diminutive suffix -ino), and the violone was the "big" version. ...


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The phrase "sheet music" is fine for what you want. What you're calling "sheet music" is stave notation. The term "sheet music" encompasses tab as well as stave notation.


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There is no rigid rule that a time signature must get a particular tempo. Tempo of your song comes along with your inspiration. Tempo speaks more of how you want to convey the message in your music. So consider the following tips when choosing tempo of songs: Assess the initial tempo that came with your song when you were inspired. Assess the message your ...


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An excerpt from the wikipedia page on the Traveling Wilburys, a rock "supergroup" of sorts: The term "Wilbury" also originated during the Cloud Nine sessions. Referring to recording errors created by faulty equipment, Harrison jokingly remarked to Lynne, "We'll bury 'em in the mix." Thereafter, they used the term for any small ...


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Perhaps 'happy accident' is the term you're looking for. But sometimes just 'accident' that it wasn't feasible (or wasn't considered worth the effort) to fix. I imagine most click-track leakage falls into this category.


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Not limited specifically to music or recording, a happy accident might be called serendipity. Several things that end up as effects in recording started out as epiphenomena, e.g., a lot of what we have come to expect in guitar tone came about because the process of sensing and amplifying the sound was imperfect. But those are not "mistakes" exactly....


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Hemi, Demi and Semi are all synonyms, they all mean half. Semi-Quaver being half a quaver. A hemisphere being half a sphere. A hemi, Demi or semi being added to each division of two. I guess a semi-semi-quaver just sounds like you have a stutter. The archiac meaning of the word crotchet is that it was a surgical device with a hook this makes sense as the ...


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