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1 vote

Is there a term for chords like F/G and C/D?

We used to abbreviate them as ‘sus’ chords. F/G = Gsus
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2 votes

The nature of rhyme in _Surrender_?

There is this common misconception that anything poetic and lyric must rhyme. Consider this: The whole corpora of latin ecclesiastic music does not use any end rhyme. In fact end rhyme as stylistic ...
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3 votes
Accepted

Is there proper terminology for the fundamental elements / layers of a drum beat?

The backbeat is the only widely used term for a layer of (or role within) a drum groove that I'm aware of. In most popular music, this role is filled by the snare drum. In jazz, it's filled by the ...
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0 votes

Term for music evoking nature – not pastorale?

There's an entire field of musical study called ecomusicology. It's mainly about the outlook of the scholar, examining the relationship between musical phenomena and the environment, but it would ...
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1 vote

What is it called when a song starts sounding like the beat is in one place, but is actually somewhere else?

The Gestalt concept comes to mind - although that generally deals with visual ideas, such as the well-known 'Rubin's vase'. That's as close as we can get with the brain being fooled into thinking ...
  • 178k
12 votes
Accepted

What is it called when a song starts sounding like the beat is in one place, but is actually somewhere else?

There is an idea called "turning the beat around", which involves establishing a sense of meter but then "revealing (or changing) the real meter" later on. This is not uncommon in ...
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1 vote

What is the difference between an auxiliary chord and a chromatic chord?

Auxiliary chords don't exist as such. There are auxiliary notes, but they don't constitute chords. Auxiliary notes are non-chord notes, in between chord tones - as in chord C major - CEG, the aux. ...
  • 178k
3 votes

What is the difference between an auxiliary chord and a chromatic chord?

Auxiliary chord An auxiliary chord is a chord formed by the presence of one or more auxiliary notes. An auxiliary note is a note that is not part of the primary harmony, but which connects notes ...
  • 62.5k
0 votes

What is the term for swapping parts in a harmony?

Are you talking about this sort of thing? Repeating the same notes, but adding some movement? Not uncommon in instrumental writing, but singers could do it. It's not really 'hocketing'. In ...
  • 81.3k
5 votes

What is the term for swapping parts in a harmony?

You may be looking for the term voice exchange. A voice exchange occurs when the pitches being sung or played by two parts are switched. For example, if a bass is singing a C while a soprano sings an ...
  • 80.3k
1 vote

What are 'modal rhythm' and 'mensural rhythm'?

Modal rhythm used note linkage to indicate length. Various patterns of notes indicated how to play the following notes. Mensural rhythm used note forms (minim, breve, semibreve, etc.); using like 2 ...
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5 votes
Accepted

Would anyone be able to help name this progression?

There's no name for this progression, but there is a name for the harmonic concept that it demonstrates. These three chords point towards G major. And in G major, the seventh chord built on C is Cmaj7....
  • 80.3k
4 votes

Would anyone be able to help name this progression?

It's a variation of the stock ii-V-I progression that underpins so much popular music. If it ends a phrase, the last two chords form a perfect cadence (or whatever people call a V-I cadence in your ...
  • 81.3k
3 votes
Accepted

What is the term for when a song switches to a wall of sound, often with a rising chromatic scale, and often found at the end of a song?

These could be in line with what Brad Osborn coined "terminally climactic forms" in this article. He states that a TCF is not a chorus but a single, thematically independent section placed ...
  • 80.3k
0 votes

What is the term for when a song switches to a wall of sound, often with a rising chromatic scale, and often found at the end of a song?

No, there isn't an accepted term. You could call it a 'Rock-out' perhaps? As distinct from a 'Fade-out'. (Though a recording might do both at once!'.
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