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4

You would call it a pentatonic scale. You are centering it around G flat, so it's specifically a major pentatonic scale. It depends how you work the melody, but lots of pentatonic melodies "work" because the scale can be thought of as outlining a tonic chord with two auxiliary notes, one a whole step above the tonic and another a whole step above ...


1

Is there a name for this pentatonic scale? Well, the black keys themselves don't necessarily make a unique scale by themselves. To show you what I mean, all of the black keys are in the B major scale. However, the same is also true of the F# Major scale (or the Gb Major scale if you like to use flats instead). So it kind of depends on the context you're ...


3

Is there a name for this pentatonic scale? The black keys can be used to construct several pentatonic scales, depending on which of them you consider the number 1 note. If you start from Gb (or F#), it's called the Gb (or F#) major pentatonic scale. If you start from Eb (or D#), it's called the Eb (or D#) minor pentatonic scale. what's the best term to ...


4

This scale is simply called the major pentatonic scale. It is build using the 1,2,3,5 and 6 of the major scale. For example in C (major) the scale tones are C, D, E, F, G, A, B. If you you take the 1,2,3, 5 and 6 you get C, D, E, G and A. Thats the C major pentatonic When you are only using the black keys you often like to rest on Gb, that's because the ...


7

The black keys on the piano are exactly what you said, pentationic scales. Which scale it is depends on what you use as your tonic or focus note. You mentioned Gb, the black keys are a Gb (or F#) major pentationic scale. Add the white keys Cb (B) and F and you have a full blown Gb major scale. The pentatonic scale removes the 4th and 7th degrees of the major ...


8

I think you're talking about the 'truck driver' modulation. PLay it, then play it again, up one step! A composing/arranging technique more than an orchestration one. https://www.musical-u.com/learn/the-truck-drivers-gear-shift/ Here's a fun take-off of the technique!


4

This is called modulation, and it is a very common technique for changing the feel of a piece. Very loosely speaking, a modulation toward higher pitches adds excitement; a modulation toward lower pitches calms things down. There aren't exactly rules for determining the "next" scale, but there are some common techniques. One of the most common is to ...


3

These are vocal multiphonics. There is an instructional video which describes the technique in very similar terms to the OP. To get that extra bit of overtones going on, you just go to the break point of your falsetto (Glen Soulis, 0:51 in linked video) There is a detailed discussion of a variety of vocal multiphonics ...


-1

Secondary, Borrowed or Altered chords Secondary chords are a type of altered or borrowed chord, chords which are not part of the key the piece is in. They are by far the most common sort of altered chord in tonal music.[2] Secondary chords are referred to by the function they have and the key or chord to which they function. Conventionally, they are written ...


2

Merely wish to point out that the term “idee fixe” is not a strictly musicological term of art but originated in psychology (circa 1812) cf. J. Goldstein, ‘Console and Classify: the French Psychiatric Profession in the 19th Century’ (2002)p. 155... and was subsequently appropriated into music criticism. Since then, the term has had a parallel development in ...


3

See, there are two types of "brief changes in key" that we see in western music. When the harmony "changes key" (usually via secondary dominants), it is called "tonicization". When the scale used in the melody changes, while the harmony remains diatonic (i.e. a piece begins to play notes from the G major scale over a tonic chord ...


10

The most common term is tonicization. For example: Tonicization is the process of making a non-tonic chord temporarily sound like tonic (SOURCE) In music, tonicization is the treatment of a pitch other than the overall tonic (the "home note" of a piece) as a temporary tonic in a composition. (SOURCE) Tonicization occurs when a chord or short ...


12

This is called Tresillo. It's a 3+3+2 rhythm: for example, X: 1 T: Tresillo K: none M: 2/4 L: 1/16 V:V1 staff=perc stafflines=1 B3B- B2B2 :| It originates in sub-Saharan Africa, and is very common in Cuban and Latin American music. Here's the first measure of the song so you can see it in context: X: 1 T: Kamouraska K: none M: 4/4 L: 1/16 %%staves {(RH) (LH)...


-3

I would call that the "Coldplay Flamenco" rhythm myself. But I have been known to be wrong.


1

Symmetry in 8-bar phrases is playing it safe. A 9 bar section is fine too. Asymmetrical is fine. If you want backup, look out the Burt Bacharach songbook. You'd think, to look at it, that 'Say a Little Prayer' would sound disjointed! Well, if you don't know it, dial it up on YouTube and enjoy. Then stop wittering about the necessity of nice neat 8-bar ...


2

Probably one of the commonest counter examples is the song Yesterday by The Beatles. It has phrase lengths of 7 + 8. Apparently, by that books reconning, Yesterday isn't balances. But does the book say that is a flaw to correct? Either way, that seems to be the concern in the question. Without debating the question of whether it truly is a flaw you could ...


5

4/2 is fine. Strictly speaking, it's 8/4 [4/4 + 4/4; or (4+4)/4]. I can't speak to Finale or Sibelius, but it's near trivial to do in MuseScore. See also Dual time signature of Alla Breve x2 in Schubert?, which has an outstanding discussion of the history of this type of time signature. It's worth noting that two modern (Internet) editions use 8/4 and 4/4 (...


1

...that being said, the G, on beat 2.5, is not in a weaker or stronger metric point than the note which follows it... Why does it matter what the following note is? Does Hindemith define accent differently than the standard? The G is off the beat. It's unaccented. You might say two syncopated notes creates a kind of accent, shifting things to the off beat, ...


3

TL;DR In my interpretation, the best fit for the G is neighbor tone both approached and left by skip. I would also say it's part of an incomplete double-neighbor gesture, along with the preceding E. Here is my thinking for each of the options given Preferred answers are in bold; "okay" answer is in italic Repeat tone Obviously not, since the G ...


3

The diagram itself does not directly relate to melody; rather, it's a map of the formal structure of the piece. It shows the major sections, the phrases comprising those sections, their lengths in measures, and how various divisions relate via the Golden Section (GS). Presumably melody will come in later, with Neumeyer showing how Hindemith composed his ...


5

)/2There is really not much relation. The Golden Section stuff came from an article in American Mathematical Monthly where some statistics on Mozart's works were presented. The development+recap was longer than the exposition by something like the Golden Section. The development+recap ratio to the entire length of a movement was much closer. In a later ...


2

The classical term is "mordents" but jazz musicians usually call these embellishments "turns". Often the higher note, is a semitone higher than the main, and the following note one step lower, but there are other possible constellations.


0

Those are called grace notes.


3

I'd say these are mordents, since they start and return to the same note. The audio example is closest to the first group in the picture. However, jazz has so many quick patterns that it might just be better to call them grace notes:


3

One of the terms is "lower neighbor." This is a bit more general than terms as the lower neighbor need not be just an ornament. It's a non-chord tone played (usually a half-step) below the main tone. A mordent is the main note, a neighbor (upper or lower), and the main note again. ("Mordent" is used for one and "inverted mordent"...


2

32-Bar form is a special case of ternary form that is so commonly used that it is deserving (at least in Wikipedia's estimation) of its own discussion Ternary form and song form are essentially two terms for the same thing. This is reflected in the Wikipedia entry: Ternary form, sometimes called song form ... [emphasis original] 32-bar form is also a ...


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