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'Direct modulation' is a widely-used term for when you reach a cadence in one key then directly set off in a different one. No pivot chord or modulatory passage. As you have discovered from your lack of search results, 'Melodic modulation' is not a standard term. So its definition is whatever you want it to be! (Where did you encounter the term? If in a ...


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In general, moving the part on the bottom to the top is called inversion. The term is commonly used with intervals and chords, but it also appears in the term invertible counterpoint, where it typically refers to two-voice counterpoint in which the bottom voice may be raised by an octave (or the top voice lowered by an octave) with the resulting ...


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It's a common procedure termed "voice crossing." Melodic lines cross each other.


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"Box" is certainly the common term, and "shape" is self explanatory. "Patterns" is generic, but used a lot in method titles like "patterns for improvisation." Personally I don't really like the term "box" and the idea it conveys. At least to me it seems to promote staying stuck in a box instead of learning ...


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A chord progression is simply the movement of one chord to another chord. The study of chords and chord progressions is called harmony. To some degree harmony analysis focuses on the roots of chord so you also hear the term root progression used in a way more or less synonymous with chord progression. A single chord has expressive potential. In simple, ...


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Position comes to mind. It seems there are five available on guitar. Their numbers are 1-5, but not all seem to align. A 'position' is a place where there are lots of notes from a particular key available across the strings, going from the lowest to highest available without stretching - so a four fret 'box'. Each 'position' overlaps the next. The one you ...


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What comes to mind for me is fingering pattern, and is usually coupled with a qualifier such as chord fingering pattern or scale fingering pattern or melodic fingering pattern, these patterns are movable up and down the fretboard according to the root note of whichever key matches the particular song we are speaking about. The pattern in the picture appears ...


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Your description sounds like a refined example of the Levitin Effect. (Note Dekkadeci's comment on jcarp8's 10 Jan 2020 answer.) For more information, please see Sometimes I naturally sing songs in the right key. Do I have perfect (absolute) pitch?


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