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4

The trio in a march is a second contrasting section, often more lyrical in character and usually in the subdominant. Very often the first part consists of two sections or "strains", both repeated. The trio is the third strain. Some marches end on the trio, some return to the first section. A classic example of a march that ends on the trio is Sousa's "The ...


10

In musical theater this is often called a "button" (particularly if it's a low note).


2

A more general classical term for this is a Cadence. Although not all cadences are at the end of the piece, and a cadence need not be a short accented note, though they often are. The sense of finality or closure is definitely implied in this definition though. Sometimes it just closes a phrase and not the whole piece, but there is always some sort of ...


0

"Bumper" I've only heard used to refer to audio clips used to segue between sections of a show, or in/out of commercial breaks. I was surprised to see those other answers mentioning they've heard "stinger" used for that purpose, I haven't. These wikipedia pages have more info for the usage of "bumper" that I'm familiar with: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


0

Indeed the sounder seems to be something quite different than a stinger: It says they endure about 4-8 seconds. I recognized now that it must be the feature to announce a radio or tv- emission like e.g. the news:


8

Stinger: A chord at the end of a march that is used to punctuate the ending of the composition. The stinger is typically played by the entire ensemble on the last beat of the last measure of the composition and contains an accent. - https://musicterms.artopium.com/s/Stinger.htm


30

Within the context of a march, this final pitch/chord is often called a stinger; it's used to punctuate the end of the entire piece. According to this Wikipedia entry: The last measure of the march sometimes contains a stinger, a I chord played in unison on the upbeat after a quarter rest. Most, but not all, marches carry a stinger. "Semper Fidelis" is a ...


3

I was wondering too, when I read this term in the other question about the Bossa Nova. Then I've found this link (s.below) that confirms what Tim explains. It says: Rhythm is also defined by chords and where they fall, a little earlier or later - I would say similar or the same as off-beat: I thought, the push chord must be what I know from the big band ...


5

It's not the chord so much as the rhythm that gets pushed. Nothing much to do with bossa, but it happens all the time in a lot of pieces, The emphasis is expected to come on the 1st beat of the next bar, but instead, comes a little earlier, usually on the & of 4 of the bar before (in 4/4). It effectively puts the emphasis where the next heavy beat ...


1

This is the German translation by google of my question: Ich frage mich, wann und von wem figurierter Bass als Synonym für durchgehenden Bass im Basso continuo eingeführt wurde. Meiner Meinung nach muss dies irgendwie ein Irrtum oder ein Missverständnis des figurierten Basses auf Deutsch sein. (I sometimes translate my text here into German to see ...


2

I don't think it is a "misunderstanding" at all. It is just the fact that the English word "thorough" has changed its meaning over time. The original meaning only survives in a few compound words like "thoroughfare." In Old English there were two alternative spellings of the modern adjective through, i.e. thurh and thuruh. The spelling "thorough" dates ...


0

I have found this differentiation: Choralbuch Style (homophonic) and Choralgesang Style. This shows that embellished or varied - like Michael Curtis has proposed - would explain it fine. Actually I’d prefer the term figured bass, descant or chorale, if it figured was’t occupied (erroneously?) by thorough bass.


3

The generic English term variation can be used. It would include variations where figuration is applied to both the melody and the bass. Just to confirm what we are talking about with music examples, Mozart K 265: http://imslp.eu/files/imglnks/euimg/9/96/IMSLP188992-PMLP55775-Mozart,_Wofgang_Amadeus-NMA_09_26_06_KV_265_scan.pdf Theme in mostly simple ...


0

That's called a "vocalise" (pronounced "vocal-ease") Vocalise dates back to the mid-18th century. Jean-Antoine Bérard's 1755 compilation L'art du chant includes a selection of songs (sans paroles) by composers such as Lully (1632–1687) and Rameau (1683–1764), chosen for their value as exercises in vocal technique. Accompanying the exercises were ...


4

When has it first appeared in [Western] music? "Portamento [has been] considered an essential aspect of good singing for hundreds of years..." -- J. Potter, 2006, "The rise and fall of portamento in singing", Music & Letters 87(4), p. 523


46

Is it possible there is a "dim" around m. 25 or so? Often a composer (or in this case, an editor) will request that an expression marking takes place over a span of time instead of instantaneously. One such standard marking is "diminuendo," which instructs the performer to gradually get softer. It sounds like the "inuendo" is simply the latter portion of a ...


8

Sliding between two notes, up or down, and including the notes 'in the cracks' at the same time, is called portamento. It's been around for as long as the particular instruments it's possible to play it on. As you say, trombones, unfretted stringed instruments. It's possible also on trumpets and clarinets, easier to play in the upper registers.Slide guitar ...


4

Glissando, "glide from one pitch to another", or portamento, "pitch sliding from one note to another". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glissando https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portamento


0

The “central tone” of your examples is either the root tone of the key tonic or the dominant: For example, in a piece I am playing, the melody is: F C G C Ab C Bb C. This is the scale of f-minor (F,G,Ab,Bb,C) and it’s always turning to the 5th as changing tone, very usual in Baroque era, but also known in Classic music as Alberti Basses. Eb C F C ...


4

In the cantata form as used by JS Bach, these "chorale fantasias" often have an elaborate orchestral introduction. The opening of BWV 244 (the St Matthew Passion) has often been described as such, and both the opening movement and the final movement of BWV 147 Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben fit this pattern. However, the structure of the chorale fantasia ...


1

As far as a "common, global, inclusive term for something as sensory and subjective as "the center tone of a song", I think the question is too vague as presented. Most questions appealing to esthetic judgment cannot be answered in any absolute sense. If rephrased more operationally, it might ask, "What tone or frequency would be the least dissonent ...


5

I’ve always heard it referred to as the tonic. A lot of the (traditional-based) music I play is centred on drones and/or modes, and tonic is the easiest way of expressing the ‘note that the melody centres around’.


8

In my answers here I tend to use home note if I want to avoid any implications as to what kind of music I'm talking about. It sounds a bit childish and not very technical, but perhaps that is why it doesn't seem to have any unwanted implications about the type of music. I don't personally assume much about the type of music if I read 'tonic' or 'tonal ...


6

I've heard "tonal center". I know you said you've heard that that's only for tonal music, but I'd argue that it's fine to say a modal piece has a tonal center. Tonic is a term that I hear more often in tonal music. As long as there is a discernable center, I think it's perfectly acceptable to say "tonal center", even when the piece has more of a mode-based ...


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