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The Real Book is a well-known example of a "fake book". For the history of fake books, see What is a Fake Book?. Secret origin of The Real Book Two (anonymous) Berklee students compiled The Real Book sometime between 1971 and 1975. It quickly became very popular, but, since no copyrights had been secured or royalties paid, also very illegal. For ...


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“The Real Book” is now published by Hal Leonard and yes, the songs in the book are all copyrighted and published. That wasn’t always the case, early editions of The Real Book were bootlegged, the songs were transcribed and books were printed and sold without paying royalties to the publishers and composers of the songs in it. If you plan on recording songs ...


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The chords in The Real Book (or any fake book) only tell you the general outline of the harmony. Playing them as given will not include the melody (except by occasional coincidence). To realize the music means to arrange the notes of the chords and melody so that they can be played together. The chord voicings you choose -- that is, the specific way you play ...


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Real and fake books are skeletons of classic tunes. They're the bare bones - containing minimal information. The basic tune (lead) and the harmonies (chords), sometimes with alternative chords shown. They're really not meant to be any more, any less. They're enough for musicians to have in front of them to play, straight off, any of those tunes. Because it's ...


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what other stuff should I know? You need a general knowledge of harmony. In particular: What notes are in chords What upper structures can you add to a given chord in given context (this is closely related to scales) Which notes of the chords are the most important for their harmonic function (on guitar chords played with 3–4 notes often sound the best, so ...


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The only way to know is to have both books side by side as there is no key list in the table of contents as I recall. A few things to keep in mind are: Are you looking for the true original keys or the keys the songs are mostly played in nowadays? Sometimes you have to go all the way back to an ancient recording or a very old movie or musical to find the ...


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The head being the main theme of the song, it is indeed the A part that has to be played. This can also be confirmed by listening to the original recording.


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Listen to a recording of the piece and see what sections are used as a solo section. It differs from piece to piece, and my guess is that there is some flexibility with it, as long as the chord transitions from the end of the head of the piece back to the beginning of one of the sections is smooth. Say a piece has A, B, and C sections. Some will use all ...


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The usual Real Book's are OK but contain many errors or suspect chords. Better are the "New Real Book" by Sher Music (there are a bunch of them). Also that way you are legal. Worlds Greatest Fake Book is also supposed to be good, but I don't own it. By the way if you play a transposing instrument (Eb/Bb sax etc) here's some advice : just by C copies and ...


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As the other answers point out the Real Book is just a collection of lead sheets. You must be just starting out with jazz so you should look at both: Fake books and lead sheets, and get some books or lessons about how to play from a fake book. There are lots of lessons for that. Jazz transcriptions, which is when someone writes down in notation a recorded ...


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A Real Book chart is often based on the most popular version of the tune, not necessarily the original. For example, Autumn Leaves and Black Orpheus are from the Sinatra versions. And, as stated in other answers, these charts are intended to show the conceptual framework of a tune, rather than capture nuance of a particular version.


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As Heather says, you can use any section you like to solo over. The verse is probably one of the best, as if it's a vocal piece, the singer can pick up straight after the verse you solo over, and into another chorus. But, each piece will have its own geography, and will lend itself better to one particular part. For an inexperienced player, the part with ...


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The first edition of The Real Book dropped in the summer of 1975. It was transcribed and compiled by two Berklee students, with proofreading and guidance from faculty members Steve Swallow, Pat Metheny, Herb Pomeroy and others. The primary objective was not financial but rather to make available a first rate collection of jazz standards and contemporary ...


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General Form When playing jazz standards from the Real Book, the improvisation always occurs over parts or all of the existing form/chord progression. The way these songs generally progress is: play the melody play solos play the melody a final time Improvising Over Faster Songs If a song is faster ("up tempo"), solos typically occur over the ...


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As a woman studying vocal jazz, I have found the Real Book high voice to be too high to allow me to color the sound the way I want. I only recently discovered the Real Book low voice! Works much better for me.


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I know I'm a bit late, but I find the high voice book works better for most men and the low voice book works better for most women. Yes, most vocal books are published in a high edition for sopranos/tenors and a low edition for altos/baritiones, vocal ranges for solo jazz singing tend to be different. In jazz (and many pop styles), women tend to stay in a ...


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