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27

No, and for at least three reasons: Assuming "chord" to be a tonal entity, we can explain anything as having alterations, omissions, and extensions. With add11, ♭13, no5, etc., we can make sense of any combination of tones. We can understand harmonies as combinations of chords; such polychords allow any and all possibilities. We have systems of ...


19

The difference, in short, is because one of the ensembles is using historical tuning practices. The modern pitch standard is A440, meaning that A4 (the A above middle C) is 440 Hertz. Not everyone uses this; last I heard, the San Francisco Symphony uses an A a little higher (442, perhaps), and some push it down to, say 438. But A440 is nevertheless the ...


10

To me it just seems that each key just happens to have those sharps due to the pattern of the major scale, That is exactly the reason. When the diatonic scale is transposed to start on tonics other than C (or A for relative minor) you must make adjustments with sharps/flats to maintain the diatonic pattern. ...but I'm wondering what the underlying ...


9

Why is it important to know what key a song is in? Sometimes it is important, and sometimes it isn't! If you're singing along to a song by ear, then it may not be important to know the key, unless you have perfect pitch. (It might be useful to know if a particular song has been transposed, in case that's better - or worse - for your singing range). If you'...


9

This walking bass line arises by adding V chords and a tritone substitution. Here's how we get there: First add a v chord for C7:        | C7 | F7 | Gmin C7 | Then add V chord for Gmin:        | C7 | F7 D7 | Gmin C7 | Then add a v chord for the ...


9

Whilst jdjazz's explanation is way more technically plausible - and correct - assuming the bass is playing roots on each chord (`a not unusual situation); it is based on the circle of fourths, can I offer another solution? There is a set of notes used in blues that is known as the blues scale. In fact, there are two, a minor Blues, and a major Blues. The ...


8

Technically, yes. Extended chords are created by a process of stacking thirds, where you continue to add notes from the scale, proceeding in intervals of a third (of whatever flavour) to the highest note. A 13th chord, therefore, is a seven-note chord that theoretically contains all notes of the diatonic scale. In practice, however, most often used ...


7

Before I answer, we should note that Schenker himself was not the best at expressing his own theories. His treatises are at various times rambling, political, polemical, and utterly contradictory. Furthermore, his theories developed throughout his life, so the theories expressed in a 1910 publication are not the same as those in a 1935 publication. Partly ...


7

...A B C D D# E F G# A Just the list of tones isn't enough to describe in a meaningful way what is happening. It could have various musical meanings. D# could be a chromatic passing or neighbor tone. D# could be the temporary leading tone of E, harmonically V/v A lot depends on the harmonic context. Even if you have playing only a single melodic line ...


6

To me it just seems that each key just happens to have those sharps due to the pattern of the major scale. This is exactly correct, and there's not much more to it. The major scale requires the seventh scale degree to be a half-step below the tonic, as with C major. When you build a major scale on G, you have to raise the seventh scale degree, which is F#....


5

Do different modes have the same cadence structure? No In major and minor keys, the perfect cadence is V to I Correct. For minor keys some write the Roman numerals V i with lower case for the minor tonic. Keep in mind that the dominant triad must be major for a major/minor key perfect cadence. Will this structure remain the same in a different mode? ...


5

A piece in a key will far more often than not use the diatonic notes from that key. Those notes are the ones that constitute the scale that belongs to that key. For example, C major contains the notes C D E F G A and B. There are no ♯ or ♭ involved. Therefore the key signature contains no ♯ and no ♭. Sometimes there are times when one ...


5

Adding the D♯/E♭ into your playing isn't much to do with the harmonic (or any other) minor. It's a flat 5 in blues, or a sharp 4 in jazz. Take your pick - especially if you're a guitarist..! It's a note that's been used and used since the early 1900s, as so out of tune it sounds really good.Works just as well in major keys too.Since it's between ...


5

Beats are grouped in metric units of two or three beats. The general rule for notation is that it should communicate those metric units: with very limited exceptions, primary beams are broken at metric units, and notes or rests that span metric units should be written to make the metric units easy to see (with ties or multiple rests). A septuple meter can ...


5

No. A widely cited scholarly paper calls them just what you do, ♭VII-I and ♭III-I. It offers a plethora of adjectives to distinguish different kinds of cadences, but none have the centuries of weight of the terms for the cadences that Mozart used. Edit: One might call them variants of the authentic cadence, but that's an awfully broad name, not the ...


5

Generally speaking Bach likes to establish the home key chord at the beginning of his pieces, but I did find some exceptions on a cursory look through my scores. For example, in Book II of the keyboard Partitas, the Courante of No. 5 has an upbeat based on the dominant. And the Gigue of the same Partita does something similar, with the home key chord of G ...


4

Depends on your definitions. There are certainly pitch sets that would be difficult (and pointless) to label in the 'C, Gm7, F#m7(b5)(b9)' naming system, or that defy functional analysis in the 'bii7 of iii' way. But some will say that ANY pitch set is, by definition, a chord. And, as @Richard says, any pitch-class set can be labelled.


4

Lets start with the obvious: you will do better with a teacher than without a teacher. This is for many reasons but two of the main ones are that it will bring structure to your learning and development and you will get regular feedback on how you are progressing. If you cannot get a teacher then you are going to have to be very disciplined. If you were ...


4

Most sources that give that kind of order of consonance will have generated it with simultaneously-sounding notes, rather than successive notes. So it's concerned initially with Harmonic dissonance, rather than Melodic dissonance. Its immediate utility would be enabling you to find a way to measure the consonance or dissonance of a chord. But is ...


4

Let's assume a key signature of two sharps. If someone has zero understanding about keys and harmony, the key signature (and accidentals in the score) will simply be mechanically applied. When you see a C or F notated the key signature tells you to play them as sharps. So, you may be thinking 'what else is there to know beside that?' The important thing ...


4

As a beginner, if you're playing a piano piece from sheet music then it's not necessarily important to know what key the piece is in. You can look at the key signature as a shorthand device to help you know which notes to play. As you become more familiar with songs in different keys, however, you'll start thinking about shapes more than notes. For ...


4

As you've said this is for a personal project only, I won't "nit-pick" too much... Consonance is produced when two or more pitches' waves crests and troughs reguarly sync up within a time period, such as in an interval or a chord. Dissonance is produced when crest and troughs of two or more waves have an irregular synchronicity. This mostly sounds ...


4

First, an anecdote. I was visiting a musician friend, and we were standing at his piano (he also had a harpsichord, of which I was quite jealous) and chatting about music and probably sketching out a few ideas on the keyboard. I happened to play a dominant seventh chord, followed by... nothing.... at which his wife (also a musician) rushed from the next room,...


4

When I write out the chord on the staff do I note the 5th as Db or a C#? Does it matter? If this is the fifth of the F♯(♭9) chord, then you would want to notate this as a C♯. This is because the fifth of the chord is so named because it is a fifth above the root. Since the root is some kind of F, the fifth must be spelled as some kind of C. ...


3

I think that you might be approaching this the wrong way. If you are writing a melody then just write it. The "tonal centre", if it has one, should become obvious once you have written it. Taking the approach that you need to know what key contains the notes you intend to use seems to be applying restrictions before you have even started. It might be ...


3

First of all, I recommend not thinking about your age or the "elasticity" of learning now. I got interested in music when I was 14, and in the country where I lived at the time I would not be accepted into anything but percussion, because I was considered too old (and even that came with noticeable displeasure from my teacher). I had played percussion (...


3

There is not just one modal style. Do you mean Medieval modal, modal folk, modal jazz, modal rock? I'll address two. In terms of standards, the clausula vera is the standard cadence in Medieval modal music. I think it is worth noting that even in this early style the mode could be chromatically altered to form a cadence. Your outline of cadences in the ...


3

Is there any combination of up to six chromatic notes that could not be classified and named as a chord? From the point of view of naming and classification, some would consider that groups/sets of 2 notes aren't named 'chords' as such: A chord is three notes? What do you call just two notes?.


3

Yes, popular editions will often write 'Dm6' even when the bass note clearly indicates that it's 'Bm7♭5'. Conversely, you'll sometimes see what is undisputedly 'C6' notated as 'Am7'. Don't waste time looking for a subtle reason. The editor isn't thinking about harmonic analysis but purely about chord shapes for ukulele or guitar. (The 'Am7 for C6' ...


3

You don't have two different chords, you have the same set of notes which is G-A-D. The bass is just descending down from the A to the G. When listening to the song you can even hear the harmony doesn't really change right at the end and has more of a droning effect.


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