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5

First, there are not the rules of classical music. Different people have put forth different rules. I would also rather think of these rules as strong suggestions instead of invariable laws. Therefore, if you would use formal language theory to create a classical music parser, you will most likely fail to apply that parser to all but a tiny fraction of ...


4

Not being familiar with Chomsky's work I cannot directly answer this but I would point out that in the case of Language the example sentence you wrote does not invoke any coherent ideas in the mind of the reader or listener. I do not know if Chomsky's rules predict this and never lead to an ambiguity but it would seem that this mapping of words to ideas in ...


2

Well, when you get into fugues and symphonies and operas you are definitely beyond a context-free grammar. In a computer language like Java, the meaning of a + b depends on the declarations of a and b; i.e. integer addition or floating-point addition? Making sense of a Beethoven symphony or Wagner opera requires noticing the declaration of the motif, like ...


2

I like the analysis in the other answers here, but considering the concepts of key and modulation in a classical context I think chord progressions must be at most Type 2 (Context-Free Grammar) or lower. A Context-Free Grammar is more powerful than a Regular Grammar which can only encode sequences and repetitions since it can encode local context or ...


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