Hot answers tagged

19

You've expressed an accurate sense of why there is a theory advantage with the piano, but since you also very clearly are drawn to the bass, a couple of comments: Particularly if you play jazz or popular music, you will by necessity learn a huge amount about chords and scales and how they relate, because this is the essence of bass's harmonic role in a band....


17

In many cases, these key characteristics were the byproduct of various historical tuning systems. Many of these systems were out of date by the time the Romantic era rolled around, and in that sense these characteristics were no longer still the same. Especially with the advent of equal temperament, C major sounds just like B major, only one half step ...


13

It means they expect the musical choices to display different aspects of piano technique. For example, the Level 3 list (page 35) contains "Arabesque" by Johann Burgmüller (SCORE) "Allegro in A Major" by Johann Hässler (SCORE) "Morning Prayer" by Cornelius Gurlitt (SCORE) "Arabesque" and "Allegro" are ...


12

Different time signatures can be used to simplify the notation, but I would argue that that's not the case in this example, which strikes me as a pretty clear 4/4 assuming an average tempo. Rather, I think it's just that the notation of this example isn't ideal. While it may be exact in terms of note lengths, a more standard notation would be something like: ...


12

This resolution is called a backdoor cadence, which part of another common progression referred to as the backdoor ii-V, and it is used often in jazz standards. This article from educator Anton Schwartz includes a list of jazz standards that utilize it: https://antonjazz.com/2012/01/backdoor-ii-v-progression/ It also includes some information on the theory ...


10

From what I've read on the history of western harmony (there's a good Cambridge Press book about the subject), these were viewed as temporary key changes. These modulations were driven by chromatic voice leading. Lester's book, "Compositional Theory in the Eighteenth Century" had some examples of such progressions being termed (very short) key ...


9

Chord-naming generally serves two purposes: To indicate the pitches to play, and To indicate the function of those pitches. Allowing in this case that the goal is to get the chord-player to play B-C-F specifically, and in that voicing, then the most likely chord name would be something like Bdim[sus(b2)] or maybe B[sus(b2)][#4], which would sound the same ...


9

In the common 12-edo tuning, the octave is divided in 12 equally-spaced steps (hence equal divisions of the octave). What's meant my “equal” is that the frequency ratio between subsequent notes is always the same, or equivalently the logarithm of the frequencies of neighbouring notes always have the same difference. The other way around, it means that the ...


8

There are several arguments against individual keys having particular emotional meanings (called "affects" which leads to the question of effecting an affect...} One good argument against is that various lists of emotional affects of keys is that different authors had different lists. Another is that Bach (among others) transposed works freely. The ...


7

Gregorian chant has six solfège syllables, though the first is ut, not do, and eight pitch classes, to borrow a term from modern theory, namely A, B-flat, B, C, D, E, F, and G. These apparently contradictory facts are reconciled by the fact that each solfège syllable is not associated with only one note letter. Rather, ut can fall on F, C, or G. The ...


6

As Tim already mentioned in the comments, it could generally be called accompaniment. You can categorize these in different types like: Baselines Chords Arpeggios Melodies Ostinati mixtures of multiples ... Each of these can be categorized further like for example a baseline could be: walking baseline alberti bass ... I think how these are typically ...


6

I think they'd have a pretty good idea of the leading-note function of that F♯, and would therefore not have voiced the progression the way you did! Remember, NOTES have tendencies. Not chords. Musicians knew 5 wanted to fall to 1, 4 to 3 etc. long before anyone felt it necessary to codify combinations of such active notes as named chords. And remember, '...


6

Secondary dominants were common in Baroque music, since early days. There was also a different notion of leading tone: they could lead towards a tone by the common leading tone (raising the pitch) or by the supertonic (lowering the pitch). Check out partimento materials and regole to gain insight of this thinking and how harmony/counterpoint were taught ...


6

Well, a rule of thumb is that a resolution is nice (and sounds as such) if you can go from the first chord to the second just by moving each tone up or down by at most a tone. (So, if you put a bit of thought into it, you will see that it's actually not entirely easy to write two chords so that the first does not resolve into the second!) So for instance, A7 ...


5

Very seriously, but not as scientifically as some papers and books imply. There was a huge tradition of music ethos and rhetoric, even aroused in 19th century by nationalism and idealism, and there were archetypes for feelings and contexts (as, for example, E-flat being always used in context of royalty, kingship, noble et cetera since early baroque until ...


5

Well spotted! The chords shown in the dots aren't exactly the same as those in the guitar chord windows. B7sus4 shouldn't have a D♮, there should be an E note instead. That's a mistake. (By the way, that's not tab!). There is no obligation for either the guitar chord window or the music stave to show all the notes from a chord. But the chord name should be ...


5

Seems a reasonable comment. One modification is decoration. Modify EVERY time and it becomes 'baked in'. I don't think there's any deep musical insight required here. It's just a description in plain English.


5

A rhythm, by definition, is a pattern. If that pattern includes regular rubato, then that becomes part of that pattern. So yes, it turns into a feature of that rhythm. Could depend, of course, on how regularly it features.


4

Modern modes (Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian) are simply scales using the major scale notes, but rooted in different places. Players using them prefer the changed flavour they bring. Lydian gives the sharpened fourth when compared with the standard major (or Ionian). Anything which is presented in a rising and falling order ...


4

The question is a good example of form being a matter of interpretation. For me, though, Mozart K502 is sonata form. Sonata-form analysis Measure references are to the Breitkopf Mozarts Werke, Serie XVII edition, and time references are to the Anne-Sophie Mutter/André Previn/Daniel Müller-Schott YouTube video (below). Exposition Presentation of first key ...


4

The basic triad generally contains a root, a third and a fifth. Hence your C major chord - C E G, C- root, E -M3, G - P5. Minor chords simply change the M3 to a m3. Sus chords usually replace the 3 with a P4. Assuming the B in your chord is root, the 3 is missing, and not relaced by a diatonic 2, but a m2, and the P5 has become D5. No 'ordinary' chord ! And, ...


4

Chords are named after the intervals they contain. A sus2 chord has a major second and a perfect fifth. If you start with a B chord (B, D#, F#) and replace the third with a second, you end up with B, C#, F#, a Bsus2 chord. Your chord, B,C,F with a B root, has a minor second and a diminished fifth so it's not a sus2 chord. In fact it has no name, but that ...


4

In modal terminology you could call it the locrian chord as it contains the characteristic tones of the locrian mode: flat 2 and a tritone. Lydian also prominently features a tritone with the root, but lacks the equally prominent flat 2 of locrian. Similarly, phrygian shares the prominent flat 2, but has both a perfect 4 and 5. Trying to squeeze these notes ...


4

In the scenario described, it would be harmony. In essence, it's just two chords that happen to be broken up rather than played as a single block. However, the broader question depends on context. Often arpeggios are used as a decorative form of harmony, but they can serve as counterpoint, which is a technique Bach uses quite frequently. That is, the ...


3

Basically, a chord is comprised of 3 or more notes. Some disagree and say a chord can be made up using only 2, although that's usually called a dyad. Anyone marking this answer down due to that statement has a perfect right to explain why. Those 3 notes together get called a triad, and can be any 3 notes at all. Obviously, some combinatios won't sound so ...


3

Etudes or pieces focusing different technical difficulties. For example, a etude of scales in octaves and other for staccato left hand.


3

you have to look up under accompaniment styles: google search accompaniment styles The software Band-in-a-Box offers hundreds of styles which include the rhythm section too - of course. https://www.pgmusic.com/tutorial_realtrackslist.htm Biab styles In this song I have written the melody and the counterpoint, all the rest is Band in a box accompaniment (...


3

There is nothing theory-related that you cannot learn on the bass. Also the bass is really far away from being a monophonic instrument! However, like you have noticed already, piano makes visualizing things easier SOME TIMES (I find it MUCH easier to visualize diminished chords on a guitar instrument than on the piano for example, either on bass or guitar; I ...


3

I see a couple of mistakes here, compared to the cantus firmi taught by Fux. Is your teacher using the Fux? Observations below: 2nd species counterpoint typically given the unit pulse so much counterpoint is written in cut time. The range of your treble cantus firmus exceeds a perfect fifth. Both of your examples have spots where there are two skips (“skip” ...


3

It's hard to believe you would be given an assignment to write a cantus firmus but not have a text book or syllabus for procedures. The whole point of species counterpoint is to learn about rigorous compositional procedures. How can you do that without the procedures? If you did get that, ask for it. Here is an example syllabus for a counterpoint class and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible