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Maybe think of it with an analogy. A painter's palette has lots of mixed colors but un-arranged on the palette in no particular order. Put the colors in a specific order on the canvas and you get the gradations of a sunset or a rainbow. When talking about a picture's palette it refers to the un-arranged colors of the palette. Like a monochrome palette. ...


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Tonality is the key of a piece. It has a bit to do with scale notes, but that's all. There are often times in any piece where diatonic notes won't do the job, so talking in terms of a 'scale' is pointless. Saying somethng is in, say, C major, doesn't automatically mean that the only notes in there will be C D E F G A and B. Music doesn't work like that. ...


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Very interesting! As Tim commented, diminished chords are somewhat ambiguous by design: notice that F#°7, A°7, C°7, and D♯°7 are all enharmonic equivalents. I would analyze your chord as vii°7 in the key of C♯ minor, inverted to have A in the bass, and with the note D♯ omitted. D♯ can be considered the least important note in this ...


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Generally speaking any single note (within the range of the instrument) can follow any other single note. If it is an awkward combination it just requires more skill. The problems come with chords. There two notes which have to be played at the same time pretty much have to be playable on adjacent strings. They can't be played on the same string (e.g. G ...


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There are some "rules" or guidelines about this in classical harmony theory. First parallel movement is generally considered less desirable than counterpoint or oblique movement but this is really a matter of preference. However, when it comes to having 5ths and octaves without a note in between one reason to avoid it could be resonance. These are ...


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