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5

Songwriting is a lot different from knowing theory. Knowing a lot of theory won't necessarily make you a good (or any sort of) songwriter. There have been many, many people who have little or no theory, but have written some brilliant songs. There have been many, many people who have vast theory knowledge who have written some awful songs. With grade V ...


4

"What would happen if I mixed X and Y when X was supposedly only supposed to go with Z?" Well, that's what you're MEANT to do, mix things up and find YOUR style :-) However: Sounds like you're OK on rudiments. You read the language. Now you look at songs. Study the 'Golden Age' American composers - Kern, Gershwin, Porter, Berlin. You shouldn't have ...


4

In general, when you have two Roman Numerals on top of each other they are known as secondary chords. They are chords that have function outside of the current key. The most common of these are secondary dominants which V7/V correlates to temporarily tonicizing V via raising the 3rd of ii7. To this specific instance of iii/IV, the author is saying that they ...


4

If you were to teach me all the music theory in the world for songwriting then what textbooks would you use? Taking the question literally - all of them! Of course the problem with that is that reading all the books won't leave you any time for writing songs... Even answering your question a bit more sensibly - I'm not aware of any single theory book ...


3

German pianist and composer Victor Alcántara has studied the subject of the keyboard's mirror symmetry in depth; he has published a book ("Palindromorphy") on this.


3

According to Elaine Gould in Behind Bars, which most agree is the definitive text on notation and preparing parts: "Position a mute instruction after player numbers (if these are specified), as the first of any technical instructions, since the player needs time to attach or remove the mute...The instruction *senza sord" goes before the first unmuted notes. ...


2

It doesn‘t make much sense to analyze music like temporary film music that is not written in this spirit or context by Roman numbers. You can compare this minimal music with the chord material of early Renaissance music. We even don‘t know actually the key. Has the key sign f# been set originally by the composer or by the editor? Compare the added sheet ...


2

In the player's part, a long rest is written as a "multibar rest" which only takes up the space of a single bar's rest, even if the actual rest is 10 or 100 bars long. Therefore, except at page turns, there is no real need to warn the player in advance about mute changes, because the information is in front of their eyes anyway. A long rest is a good place ...


1

Possibly ask or find out if your bass guitarist has a five or six string bass (ie one with a low B string). That means you won't necessarily have to write notes below an E one ledger line below bass clef up an octave. As someone who has played a lot as an upright or electric bassist in unison with low brass instruments I personally have to remember to ...


1

Keeping them exactly equal has some pros and cons. For instance, if one of them cannot show up to a gig, it's very good to have redundancy. But if they are not perfectly in tune and tight in rhythm, it sounds a bit muddy. To be sure you will always have the needed part I would print a copy for both of the other part. (but that's not the point you're asking. ...


1

Whatever you say is likely correct, but in a documentary Jeff Beck shows a letter he got from Mingus praising and thanking him for his version. I believe the doc is called ‘Still on the Run’.


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Well if you don't know the key signature (whether it's in the relative major or minor), you could try to see what the scale degree would be in both G major and E minor. In G major, the root would be the sharp fourth, a scale degree only found in Lydian. Also, #iv triad wouldn't really be found often in music, to my knowledge. In E minor, the root would be ...


1

The chord consisting of C♯ E and G♯ is C♯minor. Not diatonic to G major or E minor. C minor would be iv in key G, so it could be assumed that it would be #iv, or iv#. If the key sig. actually meant E minor, then in the melodic minor scale, there is a C♯, but no G♯, so I discount that.


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