New answers tagged

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With tempered instruments came Bach’s music, it unleashed a ton of creativity. But it caused a lot of resistance; most thought it sounded out of tune, they were used to just intonation. It can be shown both mathematically and in practice that tempered intervals cause a beating or ringing effect, independently of the instrument’s overtones. This is ...


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It’s an IAC simply because the dominant function chord isn’t V. The PAC is the most strictly defined cadence, and I agree with the definition you’ve quoted. It explicitly defines a PAC as being from V to I. It’s pretty common to define at least three different flavors of IAC: root-position IAC. The first two conditions of your definition are met, but the ...


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Yes, vii°7-I is as functionally close to V7(♭9)-I as makes no difference. It deserves to be classed as what I've always known as a Perfect Cadence, but I see is now sometimes labelled an Authentic Cadence. But if you're going to define different flavours of Authentic Cadence, and if the definition of a Perfect Authentic Cadence is one with 5-1 in the ...


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The E# is rather odd and skews everything - diatonically, it immediately puts you into the key of F#, in which case B would be P4th and G would be m2nd - a very unusual sort of chord or chord fragment. Consider the E# an F and you have a G7 chord without the 5th - G-B-F - a partial. It's not unusual for a pianist or guitarist to drop the 5th for expediency'...


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In orchestral scores connected barlines (sometimes - though not in this example - along with brackets at the start of a group of staves) are used to denote instrument families. In choral works we don't connect barlines, for the simple practical reason that they'd get in the way of the lyrics. For the same reason, dynamics go ABOVE the stave in vocal music. ...


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...I know the types of Augmented 6th chords ...if I'm given a G-B-E# ...what kind of chord it is When you say types of augmented sixth chords, I think German, French, and Italian and that you are thinking of classical harmony. (This needs to be clarified, because augmented sixth chord look similar to tritone substitution chords in jazz. But, the two resolve ...


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According to this resource with lists of scale/mode names, some terms for this scale (with semitone groupings 2 1 3 1 2 1 2) include: Mela Hemavati, Raga Desisimharavam, Maqam Nakriz, Tunisian, Dorian sharp 4, Misheberekh: Jewish, Nigriz, Pimenikos, Souzinak (Peiraiotikos Minor): Greece, Ukrainian Minor, Kaffa, Gnossiennes This page suggests the name ...


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you ever consider getting better at the basics of music before delving into this stuff that can only serve to distract you from the real, long-forgotten purpose of music which is to heal ours and other beings souls?


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this scale would work over Minor 7th #11 chords, lets call it Dorian(#4)


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Tenor parts are often written in the treble clef. But that means they are then one octave higher than they should be. So a little '8' is written under the clef sign, telling that all the notes are to be sung an octave lower than written. Where there is no '8', you'll notice the notes are written lower on the clef, and are reachable as they are.


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Bar lines don’t connect in vocal music. This avoids bar line-lyric collisions. I notice that both appear to be vocal pieces, but I see no lyrics on the one with connecting bar lines. As a general rule, don’t connect bar lines in vocal music; do connect them in piano music.


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In isolation, you have to rely on the spelling. And this might not be a terribly accurate guide as, even when the 'correct' spelling might be E♯, composers and copyists have a sneaky habit of writing F :-) Not sure how you'd confuse an Augmented 6th with a Diminished 3rd? Maybe with a Minor 7th? The good news is that we don't have to bother much ...


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You seem insistent that "YOUR CODE IS CORRECT" but looking at the wave forms in your links, I can't see anything that corresponds to what you say you are doing. For example both files are actually stereo even though you say one is mono, but both have almost the audio in one channel. Your "stereo" version does NOT "play the second tone on a different channel"...


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Most probably the problem is that your pure sine waves don't have any harmonics, and that's why the beating is so extreme. Any real instrument will have some harmonics, and when you play a sine wave out of a physical loudspeaker, it adds harmonics as well, in the form of distortion. This should be evident on your recording (made with a smartphone mic?), ...


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What you need to understand the step progression is to identify the motif, its repetitions and then you recognize the progression. (This happens sometimes rather by singing or listening than looking at the sheet music!) Often you can divide one part in two voices. when you let turn a passage in your head suddenly your mind identifies the steps “...


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From what you wrote, I would suggest practicing scales and arpeggios. This might sound to you dauntingly tedious, but it's actually for a different reason than those professional (classical) pianists who devote hours into practicing them. Since it seem that you can recognize the patterns on the score conceptually but find it a bit hard to realize it on ...


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It is the chord that's being played at that point, by the person playing the song or in the backing track/other band members (in the occasion of playing in a band)


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The basic things you are ignoring are (1) rhythm, and (2) this type of analysis is only interesting if you can hear it, not just see it looking at the notes. Which of these is going to be most obvious to a listener? Especially considering that the augmented second A flat to B natural is only "just" a step wise progression, compared with a melodic minor ...


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Well, the first thing to note is that many types of music analysis attempt to create "reductions" of music that privilege certain notes over others. Whether you find those analyses compelling is to some extent up to your own judgment and ear, as well as whether you find them useful for understanding the music. We do know from historical treatises in the ...


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I have very basic knowledge about music theory ...looking for books that explains music theory Some theory topics like rhythm and intervals have direct mathematical aspects but aren't much more than definitions: hemiola is a 3:2 relationship, or octaves have 1:2 frequency relationship, tuning systems, things like that. And some musical styles, like serial ...


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This is a good selection of books about music and math with helpful resumes: https://guides.tricolib.brynmawr.edu/music-math the last recommended book: Music and Mathematics: From Pythagoras to fractals John Fauvel (Editor); Raymond Flood (Editor); Robin Wilson (Editor). "From Ancient Greek times, music has been seen as a mathematical art, and the ...


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Since this has come up in comments, I feel like maybe it's different enough information to write a separate answer for those interested in the history of the actual term "perfect" consonance. While SyntonicC's answer rightly points out the root of this distinction arising partly from Pythagorean theory, the history is a little more complicated. To the ...


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I would start with piano. There are tons of free apps or free "Online Piano"-websites. And piano combines so much of music! Another idea would be the drums to learn rhythm. Just listen to music you like and try to play along the basics like the bass drum and the snare. You need a little bit of theory and praxis background, but there are tons of websites or ...


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There are many books about "music theory", but you're going to have a hard time reading them if you really "don't know anything about music". Now, the question is: do you really know nothing? My take is, you actually do know quite a bit. You know at least implicitly about rhythm and pitch, you can feel variations between instruments and so on. Mathematical ...


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Decide which instrument you want to play and can afford, then understand that it doesn’t happen over night or over a fortnight and requires daily practice. We can not recommend books but I would say finding an instructor who is knowledgeable is 100 times better than a book I tried teaching myself with books and charts for 10 years and learned more in one ...


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You should probably learn music theory first, maybe like a book from your nearest music store? Or maybe a private teacher? Just don’t go on untrusted sites, even YouTube may have some incorrect material. If you practice that then it may be hard to break those bad habits.


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from My non-traditional journey into music. No formal lessons, no music reading, no piano in the house... somehow I got to the point of wanting to produce music. When you learn a song on synthesia... It can help to see the chords. But, if you try to memorize an entire composition just by remembering every single note... this could be seen as trying to ...


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You need to stop caring what other people think and get on with learning and mastering the things you want (in music and in life). Any way or any tool that helps you learn to be a musician and enjoy the craft is fine. Synthesia is another (great and fun) tool to help beginners master many aspects of music, most especially playing music. It is not ...


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Lots of good answers here. For those who are visually inclined, here's an example of why the minor 5th pentatonic sounds so good, especially over a mixolydian scale. Source: https://www.guitarscientist.com/generator/index.php?frb=227yeUThPvNDTt4 (I'm not affiliated with Guitar Scientist in any way, I just like to use them to draw fretboard diagrams.)


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Any answer to the question, "who is the better singer between these two" is going to be extremely subjective at best. Each listener, in a purely sonic (non visual) listening environment, will naturally grade each singer based upon personal preferences of tonality and timbre of voice whether they hit the notes or not how nicely they sustain the notes and, ...


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First, the maxima is extinct and hasn't been part of standard music notation for close to five hundred years. Second, if you go back to the time that the maxima actually was used, you encounter a completely different system of rhythmic notation. Your "whole note" was then referred to as a semibreve, and there could be 2 or 3 semibreves contained in one ...


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The minimum standard is pretty lax, at least in talent competitions and YouTube the virtual open mic session. People can "hit the notes", but some singers will be more off-key than others because they hit more of the notes out of tune of our favourite tuning systems (12TET, just intonation) and/or with larger and/or more erratic discrepancies in cents ...


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Just looking at your examples, some thoughts that may help are as follows: I’m assuming triplets don’t give you too much trouble. They’re pretty straightforward. For the larger groupings, based on your example page, you could think through the following if you get lost: For simple (duple) meter, find the largest number of notes in the grouping divisible ...


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These are the voicings I understand you are using... ...you can call those open voicing as compared to closed voicing where the closed voicing arranges the notes by thirds (or their permutations, ex. GBDF, BDFG, DFGB, etc...) The second chord (F A) doesn't have three tones to make a complete triad. You can call that an implied or incomplete chord. Some ...


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Chord inversion generally refers to changing the bass note of a chord to something other than the root note of the chord. Thus, if you played G minor chord with the notes G-Bb-D but put the Bb in the bass (so, Bb-G-D or Bb-D-G), then it would be called "inverted". Power chords, meanwhile, tend to refer to open fifth chords. That is, you only have the root ...


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A lot of the answers here focus on harmonics, and those are related to this issue. But the main reason why notes that are close together in the bass register can sound "muddy" or even somewhat dissonant within a normally consonant sonority (like a major triad played at the bottom of the piano) is because of psychoacoustical phenomena such as "sensory ...


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Today I found the iii chord in the Beatles' "A Day in the Life." I was looking for rock and classical analogs to the common jazz (swing) progression from the song "All of Me," which begins I III7 VI7 ii. The first near-analog I found was the Beatles' tune, which begins I iii vi and then IV vi(2nd inversion) ii. So there ya go. A iii in a rock tune. My ...


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How good an interval sounds can be predicted based on the ratio between the frequency of the two notes. (Note that this is a very general description of consonance, and other factors such as cultural context and even the context of just the song can play a much larger factor.) In general, a simple ratio is heard as more consonant, such as 2/1 (an octave) or ...


0

They are the relative names of the notes with reference to each other and the tonic note. In indian music its known as(if tonic note is C#) Sa(C),Re(D),Ga(E),Ma(F),Pa(G),Dha(A),Ni(B),Sa(Upper octve C). if the tonic changes then, respectively other notes will be change accordingly. And this name are very sound friendly,when singing user can utter it easily.


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I always thought of them as synonyms, but googling around found that some people see them as different, with the distinctions changing depending on who you ask. Is there a formal distinction between them? If so, what's the difference? Well, people are applying the term "arpeggio" in different ways and that gives food for different thoughts on the ...


2

If you're fairly loose with the terminology, all common rock and pop songs are made up of only rudiments. You could look at practically every simple beat as combinations of unisons and one-handed rolls. Simple fills are often just single stroke rolls incorporating broken sixteenth notes and similar concepts covered by practically every book on rudiments. ...


1

Regardless of how the notes in 5/4 are grouped, I believe 5/4 is a simple meter because its quarter notes are divided into 8th-note duplets. A quintuple-meter respective compound meter is 15/8, with 5 dotted-quarter-note beats made of 8th-note triplets.


1

Maybe George was a better jazz guitarist than mathematician? (Edit) There are other factors that could easily throw such a calculation one way or other by 10 or 20% ... how large are the player's hands? how many frets has the guitar in question, and how many are actually reachable? is any combination of two or more notes considered a "chord"? I wouldn't ...


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Does it need classification? Why does everything have to be pigeon-holed? 5/4 (and 5/8 for that matter) is generally split into a more manageable 2 and 3, or 3 and 2. Not very often is it counted as a simple 5 with no sub pulse. That may be because humans are happier with basic counts of 2s and 3s. After all, most of our (Western) music falls into that ...


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I found a post on a guitar message board that quotes a calculation from the book (Volume 1, page 17, "General Remarks - Selectivity"). The quote describes: The number of permutations of the 6 open strings is 6! = 720. The number of permutations of the 12 chromatic tones is 12! = 479,001,600. Then -- I don't understand why -- these two amounts are ...


3

Honestly, the best way to write this is with your polychord notation. That's unambiguous and easy to read, plus it shows exactly how the chord resolves. What more could you want from a chord symbol? The only other reasonable solution would be to completely reject chord symbols and write out all the notes on a staff, which I assume you've already ruled out. ...


1

The notation for jazz chords is a completely arbitrary system. There is no musical justification for the assumption that all chords are constructed from stacks of thirds. There is no musical justification for the arbitrary assumption that the 7th is part of the basic chord but the 9th, 11th, and 13th are somehow different and should be called "tensions." ...


3

Drum rudiments are really more about the technique of playing. How to stick. Scales can't really be seen in the same way. Rudiments came about as the building blocks of play - mainly if not exclusively on snare. Since drum playing is simpler than piano, for instance, given that with piano it's not only the duration (rhythm) but specific notes at the same ...


4

Rudiments are compared to scales in the way that scales are an exercise for warming up your fingers, working on speed or getting certain motions in to your hands/fingers. They can be used in the same way, as warmups, as speed exercises and to get certain aspects of technique down. Just like you might hear a scale run in a song or a partial scale run in a ...


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