New answers tagged

1

In a sense this question rests on the same core set of assumptions as your previous question, which I tried in my answer to address, but it seems that you are essentially viewing your goal through the same framework as before. First let me say, the project of trying to understand music from theoretical, logical (even mathematical) principles is one I admire,...


3

Those intervals [of chords] hold a position in a 12TET interval ranking from most consonant to most dissonant. No. The problem is making a general statement like that and then trying to make it apply to your new composition method. If the premise about chord interval tension where true, then the chords C major and G major would have exactly the same ...


0

The only way to really be clear about what pitch is intended is to use a system that indicates the octave like Helmholtz or Scientific Pitch Notation. 'Names' can be unclear. 'Middle C' has a clear meaning, it's C4. But names like 'high C' aren't clear. For a soprano a high C is C6, but for a tenor it is C5. This wiki chart shows a combination of octave ...


2

I like the suggestions in the other answers so far. Just to also add that in a documentary, consider at what points there's the opportunity to allow the location recordings to take centre stage. For example, nature documentaries often do this when... They feature interesting animal calls The recordists have managed to capture sound as part of the action - e....


3

There may be some hints of cynicism following... For possibly the most extreme opposites, Watch one of those daytime TV sensationalist documentaries, the ones where half the show is spent telling you what's going to be in the other half... with sirens & bits shot on a phone. Then watch Blue Planet. Then decide what your intended audience is & ...


2

Sparingly. The background music in most of the shows on Discovery Investigation channel interferes with the story being shown. We don't need "danger music" every time the cops show up to investigate a crime. The music covers the speaking. It seems as if the producers just added stock music like in the silent movies. (Perhaps they are too cheap to hire a ...


0

The chord is an (incomplete) diminished seventh chord over a pedal point: B°7/C. It comes up on occasion in the classics; most notably, it is the first chord (following the opening unaccompanied melody) in Bach's Toccata in D minor (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toccata_and_Fugue_in_D_minor,_BWV_565). Per classical rules, it resolves to a triad on the same ...


1

See https://www.scales-chords.com/chordid.php for a remarkably thorough and accurate application of chord naming conventions. I think (naively) the problem is comparable to converting values between number systems. The cumbersome example that comes to mind would be developing a systematic conversion between hexadecimal and roman numerals. Fundamentally, the ...


4

The tension from a chord depends on context. The section on Ludmila Uhlela's book at thereelscore.com has a nice outline about the perceived tensions in various styles. Trivial example is the major-minor seventh which is a medium dissonance when used as a dominant seventh: V7-I or G7-C whereas as s German Sixth Ge6-I64-I or Ab7 (with the Gb enharmonically ...


6

Some chords (at least in Common Practice Period harmony) cannot be named out of context. Some trivial examples: F-Ab-Db-F is a Db major chord in and of itself but if resolved to G, it may be a Neapolitan Sixth. The collection: Ab-C-Eb-F# is a German Sixth if resolved to G-C-E-G thence to G-B-D-G(or F). It's a dominant seventh if resolved to Db-F-Ab or ...


1

is there a general reliable algorithm to determine the correct notes (with sharp/flat) No - because there is no absolute, 100% agreed-upon definition of what 'correct' note spellings would be in every situation. Don't get me wrong - there's a large degree of agreement (otherwise standard notation wouldn't be as useful, and usable, as it is). But there is ...


6

This is not an easy problem. Simple methods based on "knowing the key signature" only work for simple music. Even in straightforward common-practice harmony, secondary dominants and chromatic passing notes can quickly introduce more than 12 functionally correct spellings of the 12 notes in the chromatic scale within a single piece of music in a major key. ...


3

In order of building the chord symbol: Letter and accidental for the root. Chord (triad) types or qualities: major, minor, augmented, diminished. No symbol implies major. Power chords are often shown with a 5 like A5 meaning just an A root and a fifth above, no third. I suppose this can be consider as applying at the same level as triadic type. The next ...


1

This is a style question, not really a theory question. Let's skip the discussion about blues scale versus blue notes, blues harmony, and what is rock tonality. The question is... ...how is rock founded from blues The easiest, most direct answer I can think of is: Joe Turner and Bib Mama Thornton. Joe Tuner Shake, Rattle, and Roll Big Mama Thornton ...


0

My take on this question is that it seems to me that the term "Blues" is rather loosely applied to a lot of music that has it's origins further back in history, such as "Negro Spiritual" and even further back than that in "Jungle rhythm". Both of these categories are often found in "Blues" and in early and even current "Rock" music. When I hear someone say ...


1

There are options, but you need a few things first. Any DAW or MIDI editing software You need to be able to edit the MIDI. In my case this is a DAW (Cubase). You need to delete all automations from the MIDI like Modulation, Pitchbend, Expression etc. because this is data the notation software doesn't need. It would receive all the information and would be ...


0

Each key of a keyboard has a pitch number in midi data (1-128). Midi doesn’t know whether sharp or flat.The enharmonic definition has to be defined by the user. But usually a software has a feature or an option to find out the key or to choose the key by the user ( e.g. major minor and sharp or flat priority) for reconstructing the music according the ...


4

'Rock' is an umbrella term referring to an area of music containing many sub-genres that has been evolving for nearly 70 years now. Even at its birth, it evolved from multiple genres such as Country, Blues, and Boogie-Woogie piano music. As time has moved on it has taken in more and more influcences such as folk, classical, jazz... and ultimately, every ...


0

A probable use for this chord for a progression may be D min - C Maj7♯5sus4 - C maj for those who want an example. Just to confirm: C Maj7♯5sus4 would be C F G# B A P4 above the root would normally be an avoid tone, but in a sus4 chord isn't the point to play it? Effectively the P4 becomes a sort of chord tone. I have to say 'sort of' because ...


3

First of all you can play anything, it does not have to follow a set of rules. Music harmony theory expresses a set of guide lines for western multi-voice music. When it comes to a single chord there are no "avoid" notes (I realize I may be contradicting some advanced jazz chord textbook but I stand by the statement as it relates to artistic choices as ...


5

Two things to start off: 1) If you have something over F minor, you've got a polychord. B over F minor is B-D♯-F♯ over F-A♭-C. From your question I'm guessing you meant "F minor over B", which says it's an F minor triad over a B bass note. 2) If the bass note isn't a tone of the chord it's being played under, it's a "non-harmonic tone". ...


4

The chord in the box is a "French" augmented sixth chord (A-C#-D#-F##), which resolves to G# major as V/C#m. The crucial voiceleading is the augmented sixth A-F## resolving to the octave on G#. (This is a good example of why we need double sharps; the interval sounds like A-G, but it is not a seventh! If it were, the "G" would have to fall back to F#.) ...


3

Is it correct that composers of most popular genres use 12 TET based interval consonance and dissonance when building chord progressions and a composition as a whole? Yes, but this just begs the question: how are consonance and dissonance used? Could you provide me with the interval ranking (intervals from most consonant to most dissonant, in that actual ...


0

Well, this exercise is terrible written or explained :P I guess it would make more sense if there is a time signature with it, because you should identify the beats. So if the time signatures would be for example: 2/4 4/4 3/4 3/4 2/4 then the beats you need to identify are: 1st beat 1st & 4th beat 3rd beat none... (or wouldn't make sense?) 2nd beat ...


4

Is it correct that composers of most popular genres use 12 TET based interval consonance and dissonance when building chord progressions and a composition as a whole? No, not really. I mean, it's true that popular songs use mostly 12 TET for their framework (although not strictly, since singers don't stick to religiously to 12TET, not do lead guitarists or ...


0

I don't know if this is the true dissonance ranking but here is my personal ranking: Rank -1 Unison This I don't really consider to be an interval because the 2 notes are exactly identical. So, that is why I gave it the negative rank. Rank 0 Octave and Perfect fifth These are the 2 most open intervals and so it isn't surprising that these intervals ...


3

The ranking of consonance and dissonance of intervals is essentially the same in 12-tet as in "just" tuning. Same for the "mean-tone" tuning. That's why the tempered tunings work well.


0

This is why I asked here because it doesnt make sense to me at all I would say: "Don't worry, it doesn't seem to make sense to us either!" My assumption would normally be that these dots are supposed to represent strengths of simplified versions of well-known "beats", with the large dots being strong beats, and the smaller dots being weak beats, and the ...


2

TL;DR: the bass line implies more chord changes than just the F7 and C7, but whoever wrote the material you're reading forgot to explain it. The bass line F A Ab D can be used for many different things, but the one thing that does not work is playing a simple F7 chord over the whole bar. It just doesn't work. The bass line disagrees with a plain F7. Are ...


0

Occam's Razor take 5: Bb7 substituting for F7, or added to it. C7 | F7 Bb7 | C7...and then on to the rest of the blues...


2

Sort of. We're all familiar with the 'pile of thirds' textbook examples. And a 13th MAY include the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th - but almost certainly not the 11th, unless it's sharpened. But see this quote from Piston. Particularly note his comment that a 13th may often usefully be seen as a suspension (whether resolved or not). And, if tempted to describe ...


2

How do real guitar players approach this problem? Do they analyse every song from the tab version...? As a broad answer, I'd say that yes - musicians who wish to do so tend to be able to translate fairly fast in their head from 'absolute' form in a particular key to 'relative'/'analytical' form when they need to. ...or do they know about a secret ...


2

I've used a similar system for decades, based on the NNS (Nashville Number System). That uses Arabic numbers (1,2,3) whereas mine uses Roman Numerals. Not really seen it in general use, but there probably is stuff in the NNS that would do for you. I tend, for simplicity not to go down the secondary dominant route (V/V), but will use II instead. ii would be ...


2

As a really simplified state, the last number note needs to be there. And, since it's above 7, that needs to be there as well. So a 9th will have 7 and 9; an 11th will have 7 and 11, and a 13th will have 7 and 13. Those last three could also be regarded as 7 and 2, 7 and 4 and 7 and 6 - all happily adding to the appropriate numbers! Of couse, there's the ...


0

As far as I remember, Guitar Techniques used nearly the same notation that you propose when they used to do songs. They had the bar number at start of each row, for example 47 51 55. And then, if the last row had a repeat, next row might start with bar 63 or 61. I wasn't even aware some are numbering the bars as they appear on sheet not as they appear in ...


8

Technically, yes. Extended chords are created by a process of stacking thirds, where you continue to add notes from the scale, proceeding in intervals of a third (of whatever flavour) to the highest note. A 13th chord, therefore, is a seven-note chord that theoretically contains all notes of the diatonic scale. In practice, however, most often used ...


1

I'm offering up a passing motion/non-chord tone type explanation. Chords: C7 | F7 | C7/G ...the /G is my addition to make clear the quoted bass line in fact plays a second inversion chord. Bass: (...nothing quoted for first chord) | F A A♭ D | G B♭ C C The first two tones need no special explanation. They simply arpeggiate the F7 chord. The A flat ...


1

What advice do you have to getting all the pieces(drums, melody, chords, and bass) of my song to sound good together? Some of the comments are telling you to learn music theory. That's good general advice. At the very least it will give you the vocabulary to talk to other musicians and read books about music. My practical advice would be: take a break ...


9

Whilst jdjazz's explanation is way more technically plausible - and correct - assuming the bass is playing roots on each chord (`a not unusual situation); it is based on the circle of fourths, can I offer another solution? There is a set of notes used in blues that is known as the blues scale. In fact, there are two, a minor Blues, and a major Blues. The ...


9

This walking bass line arises by adding V chords and a tritone substitution. Here's how we get there: First add a v chord for C7:        | C7 | F7 | Gmin C7 | Then add V chord for Gmin:        | C7 | F7 D7 | Gmin C7 | Then add a v chord for the ...


3

The harmonic series is not in strict order of pitch consonance with the fundamental. This can be seen from the fact that there are harmonics that are two, three, four.... octaves above the fundamental, all of which would themselves be very consonant with the fundamental, and yet have harmonics either side of them representing pitches that are less consonant. ...


0

But I still find myself confused on those weird out-of-key chords... I'm not sure how helpful it is to think of out-of-key chords as "weird". A key doesn't tell you "You must use only the notes I say, and if you don't, you are weird". A key says "If you build triads within this set of notes, that's a good starting point for creating some harmonious sounds"...


3

It's because the fourth is the inversion of the fifth. E is the third harmonic of A, and C# is the fifth harmonic of A, but A is the third harmonic of D. So the ratio of the ascending fifth (the interval, that is, in this example A to E) is 3:2. The ascending major third (for example A to C#) is a ratio of 5:4, and the ratio of the ascending fourth (A to ...


5

Generally speaking Bach likes to establish the home key chord at the beginning of his pieces, but I did find some exceptions on a cursory look through my scores. For example, in Book II of the keyboard Partitas, the Courante of No. 5 has an upbeat based on the dominant. And the Gigue of the same Partita does something similar, with the home key chord of G ...


4

When I write out the chord on the staff do I note the 5th as Db or a C#? Does it matter? If this is the fifth of the F♯(♭9) chord, then you would want to notate this as a C♯. This is because the fifth of the chord is so named because it is a fifth above the root. Since the root is some kind of F, the fifth must be spelled as some kind of C. ...


1

Since the piece is mainly featuring sharps, anyone who is reading the written version will have their 'sharp hat' on. So it is easier for them to continue thinking in sharps. Why not? And while you're at it, keep it all the same for the tritone. To some, it won't matter, as they are sufficiently good sight-readers to merely read what is presented on the ...


4

First, an anecdote. I was visiting a musician friend, and we were standing at his piano (he also had a harpsichord, of which I was quite jealous) and chatting about music and probably sketching out a few ideas on the keyboard. I happened to play a dominant seventh chord, followed by... nothing.... at which his wife (also a musician) rushed from the next room,...


3

This is a big subject! Actually, your hypothetical C, F, B chord, in a C major context, would probably resolve best to C, E, C. The tension would be in the tritone F, B. The tonic C would remain. In common practice harmony, dissonances and resolutions often involve tritone intervals. Post-tonal harmony uses other methods. I think you'd better start off ...


5

No. A widely cited scholarly paper calls them just what you do, ♭VII-I and ♭III-I. It offers a plethora of adjectives to distinguish different kinds of cadences, but none have the centuries of weight of the terms for the cadences that Mozart used. Edit: One might call them variants of the authentic cadence, but that's an awfully broad name, not the ...


3

This is too long for a comment, so I'll submit it here as an answer. Without hearing how you are actually using these chords, (the rhythm, if you've written a melody then what that sounds like etc.) it's impossible to give an answer to this question. If I heard the context and how you are actually playing the chords, I might suggest some specific changes ...


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