New answers tagged

1

There is more than one definition of improvisation, or more than one approach to it. It would be incorrect to assert it is spontaneous composition. After much reflection many people come to realize that what they thought was spontaneous was really the result of years of rethinking some of their favorite lines to tunes. One of my favorite definitions, due ...


0

There are many ways to improvise music and very few hard and fast rules, but depending on which approach you choose to use there are guidelines that can help you achieve the results you are after. I find an understanding of harmony is very important, along with a very pronounced familiarity with my instrument, a well developed muscle memory, and the ability ...


-2

Composition is taking as much time (hours, days, years, ...) as needed to create a piece of music. Improvisation is taking two seconds to creat a piece of music.


4

Improvisation is spontaneous creation and performance. One way to think about it is by analogy. Compare music to language. You can recite a poem, something already composed like a Shakespeare sonnet. But, if you were really good with words, you could spontaneously construct a sonnet. If you were to improvise a sonnet, you don't invent a new language, ...


2

Today, in class, I was part writing ... As Tim’s and other answers say: In music - like in most situations of life - first was practice and then theory! First were the modes, the tetrachords and later the accidentals came up and the theory of lead tones and functions was created or invented. Why do we learn a system only to then change it down the ...


0

The theory term must be modal interchange. Like a borrowed chord is an example of modal interchange we have here the case that the whole scale adapted to the tune is modal changed. https://music.tutsplus.com/tutorials/introduction-to-modal-interchange--audio-14142


1

I'm not sure what the context of your situation is, but if you can make those chords more than a triad (such as adding dominant/minor 7ths, etc.), it could be possible to determine the key. For example, if: Am -> Am7 F -> Fmaj7 G -> G7 C -> Cmaj7 , then it would definitely be in C. The pattern of this in any given major key is: I -> maj7 II -> m7 III ...


1

-> The axis of awesome 4 chords songs Your example starts with Am: so this one i VI III VII and it is modal. Compare it with: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%E2%80%93V%E2%80%93vi%E2%80%93IV_progression


2

...Take the progression Am F C G That list of chords doesn't determine a key. Those chords as a bunch of tones could match the key signatures of A minor or C major... or you could even say it's in F where the G chord is a secondary chord, etc. etc. The real point of putting Roman numerals on the chords it to say what key the chord are in! IMO it's more ...


1

Am F C G - in key Am will make Am i. F is VI, C is III, G is VII. In key C it will make Am vi, F is IV, C is I, G is V. Usually the telling chord in Am is V - E. So if the piece has some E chords, it's more likely to be in key Am. If not, it'll more likely be key C. The last chord is also a good clue to the key. That's what will be the decider as to how ...


1

Depends if you choose to relate it to the key of C major or A minor. If you choose A minor - and if A is established as the tonic you probably should - there's then the additional question of whether to call C III or ♭III. I know which I prefer - after all, if you call C III, what would you call C♯? (It COULD happen!) But some people ...


1

My rule of thumb is: is the tonal centre of the song Am? Stick to i VI III VII. Does the song start in the relative major key for instance (C in this case), then feature this passage? Then stick to vi IV I V. See Hallelujah by Leonard Cohen, the verse is in the major key (starts with the I/vi vamp, then explicitly says it goes like this, the 4th the 5th.....


0

There are number of things that can't be explained with the help of the notations, it just explains only the basic structure of the song or musical composition.Specially if I talk about the indian classical or isntrumental compositions which is totally based on the improvisation of the ragas, or raga based compositions,there are things used like microtones ...


0

If you are able to write lyrics and melody, you have written your song. Harmony (chords) actually fall into the category of arranging the song for performance. If you are not a musician you have the option of studying to become one, or finding another musician who can help you develop your song. Another option is to look for an educated arranger who can ...


0

If it is this passagio, I assume we are in Cm and the 1st chord is Ab (VI), Eb+5 (III+5) D7 (V/vm) For more information: https://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/view?docId=ft7j49p1r5&chunk.id=d0e4424&toc.id=&brand=ucpress


1

Definitions are not always that strictly adhered to, and different authors/sources may use slightly different definitions. It's pretty common usage to define "available tension" just for a certain chord type, without considering a related scale. E.g., a Cmaj7 chord could be used as a I chord in major (where the #11 wouldn't available diatonically), but it ...


-1

I just wanted to chime in and say that Databases are designed for items that are subject to change. Chords, Notes, Keys, etc don't change. So last thing you want in any music application is latency. Computers are built on mathematics, and so is Music Theory, so they get along quite well. Midi Messages are byte arrays.. And computers love bytes, they take ...


1

Probably not yet,but in the future... Problem is, given two or three notes from part of a melody may - or may not - fit to one chord. Often there are several choices, which is one reason most melodies can be, and are, particularly in jazz, re-harmonised. Nothing wrong with that, except the options grow in number as any melody progresses. A programmed app ...


0

Not really. To make a chord you need 3 or more (or at least 2) notes. An app may be able to transcribe the melody you're singing, but it will be up to you to choose the other notes to create a chord. If you learn some basic chords, maybe enough to play a few songs in similar styles to the ones you want to write. then you should be able to make a decent ...


1

I hit an obvious pattern in the first two, so I'll stop with just the first two. Maybe someone else can look at the others. I used some Youtube piano scroll videos as a quick substitute for actual notation. Skipping intros and going to the main tune... No Time to Die basically is Em: i VI iv... V Skyfall basically is Cm: i VI iv... V Both are in minor ...


9

Sometimes you see the hands overlap like this in old keyboards music. In those cases it can be understood the music would have been played on an instrument with two manuals. Harpsichords and organs often have two manuals. In modern times people sometimes stack up two electronic keyboards. You could play overlapping hands that way too. I suspect this is ...


6

You will play the G again in your RH as notated. In this instance, the pedal will sustain the LH G (see the pedal marks below the bass clef). Therefore, you’re good to lift your LH thumb from that G to allow the RH to play it. Note that it is not usually recommended to rely solely on the pedal to sustain notes. Normally, even if there is a pedal marking (...


2

What is a secondary dominant chord? There are two parts to the question: what is a dominant chord? secondary to what? In major/minor tonal system the tonic and dominant chords are the two most important chords which define a key. A tonic chord can be any major or minor triad. The tonic chord is the "home" chord of the key, the principle chord of ...


2

(Bunus video link at the bottom) Q: How accurate are they? A: Some of them (e.g. some MIDI-to-colored-lines) can be pretty accurate in terms of pitch and duration, many others are mostly an artist's impression. (Like the line rider) Q: Couldn't there be completely different pieces of music with rather similar visualizations? A: Yes, if the visualization ...


1

What is a secondary dominant chord? Let's say we are in C: V7-I => G7 = dominant7 of C: G7 - C V7/V => D7 secondary dominant of C: D7 - G (spelling D-seven is five seven of five of C) etc. following the circle of 5ths and "running" counter clockwise back to C Example 1 : V7/V (five seven of five) C => B7-E7-A7-D7-G7-C = I-V7/V7 (B7-E7)-V7/V7 (E7-...


3

I’m not an academic musicologist but I really cannot see this kind of sound-to-light generation being remotely useful in replacing standard notation to transmit, store, or analyse music in the way you suggest. Unless an agreed standard is reached where colours and positions can be agreed to represent notes, durations and rhythms, these will always be an on-...


3

The concept has been used for many centuries - often spuriously in my view - and Bach was probably one of the luckier ones. BACH translates directly into musical notes, as fortuitously the German notation uses 'B' for B♭ and 'H' for B♮. John Cage was also fortunate and wrote Cage Dead as one of his audible pieces. It's akin to 'personalised ...


0

The first one is the trivial modulo cipher but using the H=B rule. ABCDEFGH IJKLMN OPQRSTU VWXYZ ABCDEFGH BCDEFG ABCDEFG ABCDE The second one isn't even the same number of letters so I am suspiscious of it being a mapping. Use the first one for your word.


0

In English, one has two vowels (A,E) and 5 consonants (B,C,D,F,G) so you get what can be spelled with these letters. In German one gets H (and perhaps Es, As, etc.); I don't know other languages that well. (Use the syllabus, do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti, perhaps?) German gets to have BACH and English gets CABBAGE.


0

In a comment of this recording cycle https://utahsymphony.org/explore/2017/10/the-legacy-of-camille-saint-saens/ we can find the following characteristics: the influences of the composers he most admired, the musical idioms of far-flung destinations, French Romanticism was marked by a preoccupation with drama, a heightened interest in national identity, ...


0

That "A# in a C#m chord" would perhaps be better considered an inverted viidim7/V. Then when the A# appears again, it is in a V/V. Both of these uses of secondary dominance in the 2nd ending make for a very dramatic half-cadence in the music. It may even trick the listener into thinking the key has changed. However, going on into the next measure, we are ...


0

There is no need of key change here. This is a half cadence. You’ll find this quite often in the first ending of a repeated phrase. The progression I vi V/V can also be analyzed as I (ii V)/ V and we speak of an extension to to the dominant. The 1st bar after the double barline is still in the dominant and the piece continues in E major.


1

Just on face value, it might actually be a more useful analysis to scrap the idea of two distinct categories and instead conceive a continuum running from nearly diatonic to pure chromaticism. One could then sort of place individual chords somewhere on that scale; As an example, I'd say modal mixture is a lot closer to the "chromaticism" end of the spectrum ...


0

I think you want to look at more than chord names like E, C#m and label your Roman numerals with keys as well as pay attention to phrase endings. It's important that the section you posted has a second ending volta. It looks like you are at the end of a musical period (two-part phrase group) that modulated to the dominant, and after the double bar the B ...


1

We really need to stop considering 'a key' as purely diatonic notes and chords. Straying into harmonies that are on each side of the 'keys'' place on the circle of 4/5s is so commonplace it doesn't raise much of an eyebrow. As in 'key E', there will be places where F♯ harmony or D harmony crops up in many pieces. When they do, it's often in an ...


2

I think you laid out several good categories in your question. You might consider some kind of contrapuntal category. That is what the chromatic augmented sixth chords really are. Chromatically altered subdominant chords to get the characteristic half step contrapuntal movement in contrary motion. Passing motion seems to be another way to introduce ...


4

There is not one absolute standard. But Kostka/Payne's system in Tonal Harmony will allow you to write a unambiguous symbol for any of the four triad types (major, minor, diminished, augmented) on all twelve possible roots within any major or minor key signature. It will also handle diatonic seventh chords and at least a large variety of non-diatonic seventh ...


2

Excellent question! Unfortunately, there does not appear to be a universal standard within the musical community at large. Even looking around this site will give varying systems of notation. However, allow me to provide an argument for the system I prefer: I tend to favor the system labelled above as "traditional" (defining every symbol relative to the ...


2

There isn't a 'general standard'. Hence the confusion. I prefer the system ('traditional' according to Wikipedia) where scale degrees are related to the major scale and minor/major chords are lower/upper-case. Minor or major dominant chords are v or V respectively. (Does a 'natural minor' v deserve the functional label 'dominant' anyway?) But the other ...


6

Regarding your first question, you could use the pentatonic scales corresponding to the diatonic major and minor chords of a key, but you don't need to. As an example, take C major. The major and minor chords in that key are C Dm Em F G Am (note that I ignore the diminished chord on the seventh scale degree, because it doesn't have a related pentatonic ...


3

Of course they are different styles. And as there is a development in classical music from early Renaissance to Baroque, Classic and Romantic eras there is also a development in Jazz styles. So there are not only different styles between the two groups but also different styles within the two groups concerning chordbuilding and voice leading. The difference ...


2

...only allow intervals 1 3 5 6 on accented parts ...parallel 5ths/8ths Those are two separate issues. The fact that species counterpoint wants you to use consonances doesn't prohibit parallel fifths and octaves. The parallel concern is about relative motion and how you get to those consonances. Does jazz care about parallel fifths? There certainly is ...


1

Extraneous modulation is going from one key to an unrelated one. Parallel modulation would be a good term for going into the parallel major/minor.


0

You can consider every sound as being made up of a number of sine waves, each with variable amplitude and frequency. I hope that this ability does not increase only through long periods of practice. Sorry, but there will be a lot of learning to do! You could start with a program that is able to analyse sounds from the point of view i mentioned. One ...


1

This is called Modulating to a parallel key. Reference: https://www.musicnotes.com/now/tips/a-complete-guide-to-musical-modulation/.


4

I think you first want to use the wording change of mode to capture the major to minor change. You often read something like "...a change to the minor mode..." Modulation is not a good choice, because the meaning of that word is very clear, and means only a change of tonic without any indication of what happens in the new tonic. I think the typical usage of ...


1

An instrument sound is made up by different characteristics. One of them is the spectral component (as in harmonics...) but others are related to attack (for instance, a guitar always has a strong attack whereas a violin can be bowed to have a low attack). This has more to do with amplitude as a frequency of time. When it comes to an instrument's tonality, ...


0

The dim vii is also considered as an incomplete V7 (without root tone), it was used before the the dominant7 chord came up (in 1st inversion like in your example). Doubling the 3rd and also the 5th is practical and I can't see anything wrong in your solution. As there is no tension of the 7th (A-G) there is no need to resolve G to F#.


1

The way the E is doubled you do need to move the voices in contrary motion to avoid parallel octaves to D. Considering that it seems OK. Maybe their expectation is to double the tonal degree G so the outer voices are E C# to D D. The doubled G then moves by contrary motion to the inner voices F# A. Like this: When it comes to the question of double ...


3

But is there any place for playing notes not in the chord? Yes. This is a basic part of understanding homophonic music (essentially music that is chords plus melody) called non-chord tones (nct). There are many nct's with standard definitions like: suspension, passing tone, appoggiatura, etc. The principle behind non-chord tones is they are dissonant to ...


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