New answers tagged

1

The diatonic scale is one of many scales called rank two temperaments, a very important concept in the way we tune instruments. What this means is that two intervals are used to generate the entire scale, one used as the period, which is the octave. What this means is that a high D and a low D, or any other versions of the same note, will both be included in ...


1

Green Day didn't go in much for mellow baritone singing. Yes, concert pitch. This is the high tenor 'rock screech'. I hope your boys know how to do it, or there'll more sore throats than a 'flu epidemic.


5

There are men and women singing each of these parts. Normally men singing parts in treble clef sound an octave lower than written. In this case all of the parts (men and women) are to sound the written pitches.


7

You made a logical assumption, I can’t imagine what else it could mean other than concert pitch. Sometimes scores for musical theater are reductions and/or are written to be as practical as possible for a conductor or piano/conductor. Ask one of the vocalists if you can have a peek at his book, that should give you a definitive answer.


3

Even though you already accepted an answer I’d like to add there is no right or wrong way to notate this as long as you get the desired result when the music is being read. It is your piece so you decide how you feel it and what the meter should be. I believe you made the right call in writing it in 3/4 time, it seems like a frantic waltz to me and 3/4 time ...


1

In my own compositions, I've used that fact creatively. Sometimes, I want to evoke and blend idioms from different eras into a kind of stylistic metamusical style. I use Alberti bass because I want people to think: "Oh, that little bit sounds like Mozart!" So this is a highly subjective question, but my answer is "no"-- even if a song ...


3

To the "is there a way..." question: yes. In addition to the characteristic Alberti bass, which is common to a very wide swath of classical-era music (Mozart, Clementi, Diabelli, Beethoven, Haydn, Schubert, etc.), there is also the basic musical structure — specifically, tonality. So taking Alberti bass out of tonality will not sound like Mozart. ...


0

For starters, try Beethoven's Piano Sonata Op.13.


1

Use a little less 'dead reckoning' and a little more experience! What instrument is playing that note? What's the range of that instrument? Is it in its 'easy middle' range? What instrument are you transcribing FOR? Maybe the original octave is less important than putting it in the 'sweet range' for THAT instrument. I agree, the further a sound gets ...


2

I just googled it and found 2 unusual scales that fits in that Am Cm Dm structure. Eight Tone Spanish Scale A#/Bb ichikosucho Scale So I've never heard of these scales before but they seem like fitting in that progression, I think that there is no reason to find a perfect scale that fits perfectly or finding a name for that "perfect" scale. They're ...


2

You reference Kirnberger so the following is regarding his era of the early part of common practice. An important concept is the association of scale degrees with certain harmonies. For example the leading tone is associated with dominant chords like V and viio. While the leading tone is in the iii chord, that chord isn't really the strong harmonic identity ...


3

Since this is an existence question, the answer is "yes", and here's an example: Telemann uses 3/32 in the second movement of his Gulliver Suite, "Lilliputsche Chaconne" ("Chaconne of the Lilliputians"). Benjamin Pesetsky, on his website, gives an outstanding explanation of why Telemann did this: Telemann writes the Chaconne ...


3

Preamble Sometimes a piece will be conducted "in 1", the most frequent example being a piece in a fast triple meter. The conductor only indicates one beat per measure, treating what otherwise might be 3/4 as "one beat per measure, and each measure contains a triplet." Examples of 1/1 used in a score Elgar's "Enigma" variations ...


3

JS Bach seemed to do everything under the Sun in his 371 Harmonized Chorales. This opening phrase caught my eyes several months ago, because it appears to me to end with a plagal cadence... If phrases end with cadences, and the fermatas in chorales mark those phrases, is there any reason to not regard that first passage a phrase with an ending cadence? If ...


3

The nineteenth century is very broad; it had some of Haydn, Wagner, and Debussy! But certainly in the first half of that century, the authentic cadence (V to I, both in root position) was supreme and treated as the "true" "form-defining" cadence. Plagal cadences (or "plagal motions," as some call them, to hint that they're not ...


1

I wouldn't say that the dimensions of music are "horizontal" and "vertical". The dimensions of music are in your head, so to speak. If we forget lyrics, the usual dimensions (as defined by me personally) humans consider when perceiving sounds they classify as music are: melody : the most prominent single leading idea that could be "...


0

Yes there is a new method. It is based on a Dissonance Index based on the Modulator-Carrier equation, and the number of peaks and amplitude variations of the chord resulting sound wave (including the Modulation effect) An increase in the number of amplitude peaks and their variations produces more stress and an unpleasant sensation for the ears. The method ...


1

Any accidental — in this case, a natural sign — is only in force until the end of the bar. Given a key signature that includes G♯, all Gs are sharp unless a natural sign appears. All subsequent Gs on the same line or space and within the same measure are G naturals. After the barline, the key signature takes over again.


0

Natural signs, like all accidentals (sharps, flats, naturals) last for a whole bar. So all following G’s in the bar will also be G natural and not G#.


-1

Because the song starts, ends, and continually revisits Bb major, I would analyze it as being in Bb major. The Ab major chord is borrowed from Bb minor. Borrowed chords are not (necessarily) considered to change the key, and here it clearly is just serving to move toward and away from Bb, reinforcing it rather than subverting it. The chordal analysis, ...


1

Rather like when a given phrase can be said, using pauses, inflections, etc., to create a very different meaning, so a given list of pitches will give a very different melody when the same is applied. So, no, a list of pitches played in one order, but with different rhythms, could be used to produce thousands of different melodies. And that's without ...


4

I get that harmony is the vertical dimension of music (thinking in terms of sheet music or a piano roll view in a DAW) and melody is the horizontal dimension. If you're really thinking about sheet music in standard notation, or a DAW piano roll, then the vertical dimension is note selection (which in itself is an abstraction of pitch), and the horizontal ...


1

Melody and rhythm work together. For the purpose of a rigid definition, one could consider "melody" as the ordered pitches and "rhythm" as the duration of each pitch. However, the two must be taken together: a given "melody" with different rhythms will sound very different; so, too, a given rhythm with a different melody. To ...


6

I believe you're missing an important point: melody is not just a succession of notes, it is a timed succession. As you pointed out, with the same "list" of notes you can get drastically different melodies depending on the duration of each note (and rests!) related to the others. The horizontal/vertical orientation that is often used for harmony/...


3

Once you start operating outside of standard major/minor scales all bets are off key-signature-wise. Especially in microtonal music, you can "invent" your own key signature as is most convenient to express your ideas.


-1

Scales and chords are overrated. I taught myself how to write music by listening to a lot of "tracker module" and MIDI music from the 1990s, then imitating the style in a modern digital audio workbench - without going through the standard "music theory" training. I hardly use scales in my compositions. Chords are largely reserved for ...


1

Listening to the recording, I think the analysis on the hook theory site is automated, which means it is good as a guide but it's not the only way to view this progression. What you're hearing is probably the strong ascending bass movement against the static melody note. The melody sits on the root note (B, in B major here) and the bass moves scalewise from ...


1

The key of a piece is a framework, not a restriction. You can stick to diatonic notes, but you don't HAVE to.


2

...I just figured out that sus4 chords don’t exist on any major IV chords. Diatonically speaking That isn't the "answer" as much as the proper way to start the question. Dsus4 is not diatonic to A major, but you could play that non-diatonic chord without necessarily undermining the sense the music is in A major. ...Is Dsus4 not played in the key ...


2

In classical harmony, the sus4 would normally use diatonic pitches. For example, in a | Ⅴ | ⅠⅤ 4-3 | viiº6 | progression in A major, you would prepare the G# in the Ⅴ chord, suspend it in the ⅠⅤ and resolve downward to F# as a Sus4-3. From there, you could voice lead back to G# in the vii°6. Alternatively, it would be also interesting to stick the viiº6 ...


2

The 'rules' in music are not 'rules'. They are in the theory stage, which means a lot of them haven't been 'proved' beyond doubt. Hence - music theory. There is no 'rule' that states 'thou shalt not stray from diatonic notes in a key while performing any music'. Using any of the five remaining notes from the twelve available has been the case since music ...


8

Key means two things what the tonic note is is the tonic chord major or minor "Key = A major" means: (1) A is the tonic note (2) The third above the tonic, when the harmony is at a resting position, is a major third. In other words, the home chord is an A major chord. The key being A major does not mean that a G note must never be played. There ...


5

Dsus4 = D G A regardless what key the surrounding music is in. There are two explanations for a Dsus4 chord occurring in A major: We've left the key of A major, if only for the duration of that single chord. We're playing a genre of music that admits the ♭7 in a major key. For example, blues routinely employ the ♭7 of their native key. The first four ...


4

It's phrasing mark, and it connect the notes of a musical phrase. In this case it's also showing that the final C in the left hand belongs to the right hand melody.


0

The first F occuring against the C bass can also be seen as a chord tone! The F against the C implies F-minor. Although this creates a fourth with the bass C and and is often defined as a dissonance in strict counterpoint, in strict harmony it is a chord change as opposed to a dissonance. After the barline it then becomes a dissonance against the E-flat and ...


4

Another way of looking at it is the distinction between diatonic and chromatic semitones. Obviously 12-EDO* doesn't distinguish between them, but 31-EDO (and 19-EDO) does. A diatonic semitone ("between tones") is between two note names in the standard major scale, represented by B-C and E-F, and also by implication between F♯-G, A-B♭, etc. A ...


2

Un just happens to be French for 'one', but it's doubtful that's a reason it's used. It matters not what gets used. Billy Joel used 'uno dos tres quattro', a band I work with uses 'un deux, trois, quatre'. One band I used to work with simply grunted: 'ugh, ugh, ugh ugh ugh ugh' in place of '1, 2, 1 2 3 4'. As long as everyone knows what the count in ...


1

There's a military tradition of counting beat one, or the lead off step, differently - most people are familiar with "HUP two three four". The difference emphasizes the first beat, and uses a syllable that can easily be said loudly (similar to the way Ten-Hut! has replaced Attention! in the US). The use of drums in popular music derives partly from ...


1

A6 contains all four of the same notes as F♯m7 - A C♯ E F♯. The lowest note of those doesn't necessarily make the name. If A is the lowest, the chord could be A6, root position, could be F♯m7 1st inversion. In your copy, F♯ happens to be the lowest note, so someone decided it must have that name. It could just as easily been named A6, in 3rd inversion. Often ...


4

Errors are hugely common — to the point of being the norm — in "unofficial" scores ("unofficial" meaning, "free, downloadable transcriptions published illegally on the net"). The E in the melody, on the word "Five" is correct. In the first verse, I agree that the chord sounds like A major (the F#, if there, might be in ...


7

Generally, you don't notate for 31-edo. Recall that we don't really notate for 12-edo either, otherwise there would be no such thing as enharmonics. Rather, as long as you intend to use it for tonal 5-limit music, you should mostly notate for meantone tuning, which can apply to both 12-edo and 31-edo. I.e., you notate in diatonic tonality, just as you're ...


0

I think this is one of the places where you could actually argue that music theory is just theory, because you can decide how you choose to analyze it, and there's no way to prove that either method is better. You could look at, "Which chord is the root of the chord progression in this music," but then you might find a song like Viva La Vida, where ...


4

There are various different conventions. One of the more common ones is to incorporate symbols for quarter sharp: quarter flat: three-quarter sharp: three-quarter flat: (Images are screenshots from MuseScore) Of course, to compose in any "style" (using the term loosely here), it's highly instructive to study the scores of existing pieces. ...


8

There are two alternative notations for 31-TET. One of them uses double sharps and double flats: Note name A B♭♭ A♯ B♭ A♯♯ B C♭ B♯ C D♭♭ C♯ D♭ C♯♯ D E♭♭ D♯ E♭ D♯♯ E F♭ E♯ F G♭♭ F♯ G♭ F♯♯ G A♭♭ G♯ A♭ G♯♯ A Note (cents) 0 39 77 116 155 194 232 271 310 348 387 426 465 503 542 581 619 658 697 735 774 813 852 890 929 968 1006 1045 1084 1123 1161 1200 The other ...


3

When playing jazz, I will often count in by calling attention to "the one" with a propulsive or percussive syllable: "mmm", "uhh", "nnn", etc. Sometimes it's to emphasize the one; sometimes it's to communicate the primacy of beats two and four; sometimes it's a concession to being a trumpet player and needing to prep ...


0

I've always believed that the Nashville system was devised to accommodate musicians with little or no ability to read roman numerals or sheet music. Country music has often utilized musicians who can play up a storm, but have little or no formal training and can count from 1 to 10 but had little or no exposure to Roman Numerals. In my own experience both ...


0

Perhaps we could call it an anticipated suspension?


1

the harmony in this bar is Eb (respective to your earlier posting) the note F is an appoggiatura resolving to the 3rd (G) - in common practice it was on the beat but - in pop and jazz it is ahead of the beat: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appoggiatura


1

Fundamentally, it's a passing tone, but with a delayed resolution. There's no "official" music theory term for this.


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