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2

I think one of the classic sources for the sound is the B section of Cherokee.. C#m7 F#7 BΔ7 BΔ7 Bm7 E7 AΔ7 AΔ7 Am7 D7 GΔ7 GΔ7 Gm7 C7 Cm7 F7 Each of the four bar lines is a basic ii V I pattern, but it is sequenced down a full step four times. The transition between each sequence is where the major to minor change happens. Like: ....


1

This is, I fear largely an opinion question, so here goes: I would start out by pointing out that the definition of "rubato," at least at Dolmetsch, is (Italian, literally 'robbed') abbreviated from tempo rubato (Italian: robbed time), a limited freedom of rhythm and tempo when performing a piece of music where the time extension applied to one note ...


2

Tempo giusto. Or Non rubato.


0

Synthesia is a good way to learn songs on the piano if you know enough music theory to understand the bigger picture of what's going on in the song. If you are familiar with all the concepts, you can basically watch the synthesia video a couple of times, and be able to play it without having to learn every single note from the video. If you're only able to ...


2

One place I've seen this done a lot in jazz harmony is in a pair of descending ii-V progressions (often in the bridge). As an example, E♭m7 A♭7 D♭maj7 D♭m7 G♭7 C♭maj7. There's a lot of ways to explain why this 'works', but the key is that the shift is primarily created to get from the first key, D♭ major, to the second, C♭ major. You could also call the ...


2

If you don't know more than basic majors and minors you're going to struggle. Theory wise, the need to know what it is that makes a chord that chord is pretty important. being ablee to play in every key , so knowing what that entails, is paramount, as is knowing your instrument really well, and being able to hear something and repeat it, pretty well note ...


3

Don't worry about 'theory', unless by that you mean basic musical literacy - reading notes and rhythms. That always comes in useful! And beware. There's a lot of half-assed 'theory' in the jazz guitar world. Listen, read, copy. Look at WHAT various books and other forms of instruction tell you to play. Don't get too hung up on their WHY explanations ...


12

You should not master anything as a prerequisite for learning Jazz guitar. There is no hierarchy of styles. If you like Jazz start with Jazz. I would say the only real prerequisite is that you actually like Jazz as a style of music. If you don't you will never enjoy learning it and never play it well. Start by LISTENING. That is what music is, ...


0

The keyboard is tuned based on equal temperament which means that the octave has 12 half steps. The natural major scale (key of C) has a specific sequence of steps from the first note, Do, to its ovtave. This sequence is {w, w, h, w, w, w, h}. You see that there are two half steps in the major scale, again I am assuming equal temperament to avoid issues ...


4

This is not a chord substitution but could be a cadence or a key change. As mentioned in other answers a very common device (found in other forms of music not just Jazz) is IV --> iv --> I (example in the key of C, F --> F min --> C) The Maj 3rd of the IV chord is the 6th degree of the Key and the movement is chromatic walking down to the 5th degree of ...


1

You can use the same technique hymnals use where there are different numbers of syllables in different verses (example A). You can use an ossia stave (example B). You can use inline 1x and 2x brackets (example C). Non-standard notation, but quite often found in published song copies where it would save pages! This sort of shortcut is permissable in ...


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This is a recurring problem, and various solutions have been used depending on the exact purpose of the variations. If you want to support different lyrics in different stanzas of the same piece, write grace notes and or dotted slurs or flags. If repeated sections should play specific things differently, either introduce instructions such as "2a volta: f", ...


0

I though the reason was because of frequencies. The two options of one major "wolf" or two minor "wolves" when it was settled in favour of the second meant we were left with the two sequential positions of BC and EF. Other than that as a Guitar player not a keyboard player imagine how difficult it would be for me to find all the C notes if the keys were not ...


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When I learned harmony (in the UK), there were 4 types of cadence. Perfect was V-I. Imperfect rested on V. Plagal was IV-I, the 'Amen' cadence. And Interrupted was a frustrated Perfect, typically V-vi. 'Perfect' seems to have been re-named as 'Authentic'. Fair enough. And Authentic has two variants, 'Perfect Authentic' where the bass goes 5-1 and ...


1

The Abm7 chord is just doing the old jazz harmony trick, a temporary change between parallel minor and major tonalities. It can also be called a tonic shift of three semitones. Matt L. already gave an introduction to the subject of modal interchange, but to give a different perspective, I'll add a demonstration of what I feel the Abm7 chord is doing: ...


0

"If you go through each note of a key, and create a triad with a root from each note. Are all the triads composed of notes exclusive to that original key?" Yes, there is a set of chords - you'll see them listed in every theory book, probably near the 'circle of 5ths' diagram - that can be made using just the diatonic notes - the 'notes in the scale'. ...


0

If you go through each note of a key, and create a triad with a root from each note. Are all the triads composed of notes exclusive to that original key? Yes. Your question implies that the scale is built like F major, resp. C-major (wwhwwwh). In this case it doesn’t matter how many sharp or flats this key contains. The structure is always the same: the ...


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Short answer: in the case of C-F# both can be thought of as tonics, because the interval is symmetrical. The figure you quote shows that each sound of the scale CAN be interpreted as having tonic C, not MUST. Note that it's impossible to do the same for C-F, their only possible relation is with F as the tonic (in Russel's theory, of course). Long answer: "...


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I have never heard of this notion of the topmost note of a fourth being the tonic of the interval, much less intervals having tonicity whatsoever (that only applies to scales). However, I can try to break down why you may think this way, or why you were taught this. I think the confusion lies in the understanding of tonic. The reason that you may consider ...


4

Yes it does. In any key you have a "natural" set of chords. You are pointing out the triads but in fact you have an entire 7 note 13th chord, just the mode of that degree played in thirds. Your formula can be extended to read. I - I-Major Triad: 1 - 3 - 5 ii - ii-minor Triad: 2 - 4 - 6 iii - iii-minor Triad: 3 - 5 - 7 IV - IV-Major Triad: 4 - 6 - 8 V ...


-1

For major keys, yes. All the chords belonging to the key consist of "notes in the key" or "notes of the key". These notes are often called the notes that are diatonic to the key, and the chords are often called the diatonic chords of the key. (The major scale is the diatonic scale starting from a certain point, so by sticking to the notes of the major scale,...


-1

Intervals are always calculated from the lower note.So if an interval has C ♮ as its lower note, so e it. The interval is worked out from C>F♯. It doesn't matter a jot if 'C Lydian' is involved. If someone is calling it 'C Lydian' (mode), then the root will be C. It certainly is the lower note. F♯ is the other note - certainly not the ...


2

They can be, they don't have to be especially as you dive deeper in harmony. In an intro to harmony, you'll build chords based off the notes in a major key, but then when you get into a minor key the harmony becomes more diverse. In a slightly more advanced harmony class you will get into the concepts of secondary dominants, augmented 6th chords, and ...


3

Yes. The point of diatonic triads is that their notes are all contained within the key - diatonic. There will be of course, other non-diatonic notes (chromatics) that will occur in many pieces, to add colour to the harmonies, but by definition, they will not belong to the key. You ask about any key. That's a little too open. Do you mean any major key? If ...


3

This isn’t something that theory ‘commands’ you to do, in the way that a dominant expects to resolve to a tonic. It's not following some rule. It’s just a thing you CAN do, and not a particularly ‘outside’ one. Same root, different flavour of chord. A unifying factor and a variation. Happens all the time in music. Repetition, imitation, variation. '...


10

This happens very often in a major key with the IV chord, which is altered to the minor chord with the same root (iv), and then resolves to the tonic chord. This works so well because of the voice leading. E.g., in C major you would get F to Fm to C, where the note A (third of F) moves down to the Ab (third of Fm) resolving to G (fifth of C). The iv chord ...


1

Simply put, a mode uses the exact same notes as its parent scale, except it uses a different root, or tonic. There is a false premise in your question - there are modes of any scale. The modes of minor scales use the notes from those minor scales. With different sets of notes for harmonic and melodic minors, there will be different modes that emanate from ...


0

A Mode name describes in a compact, unambiguous form what notes are in a scale. It's unambiguous because it's based on the notes of a major scale and there's only one set of intervals that describes a major scale. So if you're told to play C Dorian you know what notes to play—you'd take the C Major scale and flatten the third and seventh degrees. ...


0

It's not true that there are no modes of minor scales. Of course there are modes of the harmonic and melodic minor scales. And especially the latter are used extensively in jazz. Take a look at this answer for the modes of the harmonic and melodic minor scales.


1

Synthesia is at its most helpful when fingerings are added to the notes. Otherwise, you need to have at least a fairly good sense of which fingers to use on a given piece. Also, many who use Synthesia never learn proper legato playing, nor how to use the pedal. They play like a gamer might play. Leaving the pedal down through the whole piece thinking it ...


1

I hear it as: C F | Am Dm | C/E G7 | C I IV | vi ii | I6 V7 | I But there are other possible interpretations as well.


1

When you write a score in C you do not care about transposing except in special circumstances. As a small note you should probably call the score non-transposing. You write all instruments as of they were non-transposing, a written C sounds C. The transposing part is left for creating the parts. What you need to consider is firstly sounding ranges of the ...


1

The main purpose of "Writing a score in C" is to facilitate the conductor/leader of the ensemble to "appreciate" the melodic/harmonic flow of the piece "at a glance" - It is that much easier for the conductor/leader if they are all in ONE AND THE SAME KEY. The "music mind" works by judging intervals in given/same key and NOT different keys in each stave


1

The only added feature that I can see is the use of color. The colors tend to be organized by proximity around a given key. C major, which is something like pink/red, is thus most closely aligned with G (pink/orange) and F (red/magenta). The further the two keys, the further their colors are. To help visualize this, consult a color wheel: We see that red ...


1

Aside from the misspellings of the modes (they end in “an” not “en”) the information seems pretty accurate. I don’t know your reasoning for the chords on the lower half of each box, some are the 4th, some the 5th, 6th, 2nd, what purpose do they serve? Mkorman mentioned they are characteristic of the modes, maybe that it your reason for including them. My ...


2

Like @filipkv said it is e minor, specifically two e minor chords. It's a chord progression that is missing the progression. In music theory terms it is literally i-i, e-e. If you play it you will get the feeling it isn't doing very much or moving slowly. Also, the term chord progression isn't applied to one chord necessarily, but to the entire set of ...


2

There have been some good answers but since I didn't see it I'll add one more idea. Function. Since the lowest note of ii6 is the root of IV, it functions more like IV-V-I than ii-V-I. Easily the most common progression especially until modern times is IV-V-I. ii-V-I is a very common alternative to that but it sounds different than IV-V-I. Making it ii6-V-...


2

I think that's just E minor. Two different voicings. Technically the first chord is not a chord, but an interval. But it's implied to be E minor.


0

I think it depends on how it's used. Two other answers already point out the 5-6 sequence. It could also be approached with a secondary dominant to make clear it's really rooted on vi and not some embellishment of a I chord... By comparison, if you did this... ...it sounds like it ends on a tonic chord with an added sixth, a C6 with the fifth omitted. ...


5

Interesting chart! Let's see what it shows and what it doesn't. It shows a few characterstics of each mode: The 1st column summarizes specific intervals to each mode (ie: augmented 4th for Lydian, major 6th for Dorian). Each "cell" shows 2 chords/mode (generally the I and IV chord, but it varies according to the mode, showing the most identifying ones) ...


3

I think the confusion is that in English terminology ii6 means e.g. Dm6 (DFAH) while in classic harmony (German terminology) ii6 means FACD (Dm7) 1st. inversion. Edit: ii6 (= 1st inversion of ii) is FAD ... of course! While ii56 = FACD (Dm7 1. Inversion) As you may know this is a substitution of the subdom. and we don’t hear the fifth fall but C F6 G C (I ...


4

It’s not so much that it’s absent, as that it doesn’t really behave so much like a vi chord as like an alteration of the I chord. For example, Schenkerian analysts tend to analyze it entirely as a modification of the I, as can be seen in the recent Burststein/Straus textbook. Whenever they refer to it as a vi chord, they put it in scare quotes, like this: “...


3

The vi6 is reasonably common in Common Practice Period pieces. It occurs in ascending sequences I-vi6-ii-vii06-iii-I6-IV-ii6. (Root position chords are more common when using this sequential technique in four part harmony.) I found this handout on sequences on the web: http://myweb.fsu.edu/nrogers/Handouts/Diatonic_Sequence_Handout.pdf As mentioned in the ...


1

Bad data. Strong root position ii, V, I basslines are very common in many (I'd even say 'all') styles of music. The only grain of truth in your question might be if you're talking exclusively about guitar voicings. But that's a limitation of the instrument, not a musical choice. I bet the bass player is playing those roots for you!


0

Because (using the other system of chord naming) it sounds very like I6 - the tonic chord with an added 6th.


4

Outside of the V -> I cadence and the occasional Plagal motion from IV to I, leaps in the voice leading are generally in only 1 voice. Having a progression that is all root position triads and isn't planing or a simple IV -> V -> I is awkward, especially in the Classical Style that people like Beethoven, Haydn, and Mozart wrote in. Even Chopin has some ...


2

You're correct, many of the commonly used guitar chord voicings aren't like the stereotypical simple stacks-of-thirds you may have learned from music theory. Some voices are doubled, the third, fifth, sixths, sevenths, ninths, ... basically every voice except the bass note can be ordered differently in different chord grips. The bass note is an exception, ...


2

Since the focus of the question seems to be about the G#m7 chord, I would point out that it forms a chromatic mediant relation to the Em7 chord that follows after. Roots G# and E are a third apart and the chord qualities are the same. I think that is better description than calling G#m7 an inverted B6. If the B6 is presumably the dominant of Em then the G# ...


0

Give the standard tuning a guitar has, which is in itself a bit of a compromise, each chord shape is, at a basic level, 'grab what you can where you can'. For the simpler open chords, the premise is often put the root as low as you can, and try to play at least a 3rd and 5th, with any doubling as a bonus. Let's take your A7. A C♯ E and G. True, the A ...


0

It matters what the bottom note is (but it might not be the guitarist's problem if there's also a bass player). If the 3rd is too low in the voicing, the chord will sound muddy. Apart from that, when strumming, the order of the upper notes isn't a deal-breaker. When you get beyond simple strumming, you can start thinking about voice-leading. But there ...


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