New answers tagged

1

I have an even faster way to do that, which doesn't even require a Circle of Fifths on hand: Find the half-steps! Simply put: Take your chords, set of chords, or scales, and line up all of the notes into one big combined "scale". In this case, enharmonic spelling doesn't matter. Look for any notes that are right next to each other. Each half-step ...


0

Yes, I think you understand it. The "flat" would be lowering a major to a minor interval. A bit more detail follows. Dorian mode has a minor third and minor seventh above the tonic. Whether sharps and flats are involved depends on the key signature and which tone is the tonic. If you were in D dorian with a key signature of no sharps and flats, you ...


1

"Flattening" a note refers to lowering that note by a half step; the term isn't key-dependent. For example, E->Eb, F->E, F#->F, and F##->F# (though I can't think of a practical example); when flattening (also Eb->Ebb). There is a bit of subtlety in this. Flattening or sharpening a note does not change the note name. (Notational ...


1

The basic major scale is the datum point. Changes which make modes and minors are notated from those major notes. So, saying C Dorian has a ♭3 it says E♭ rather than E♮, and ♭7 of B♭ instead of the 'standard' B. Both notes, as it happens are majors changed to minors - M3>m3, M7>m7. Moving any note down one fret on guitar essentially flattens it - ...


0

An ideal vibrating string (for example) vibrates not only at its full length but also half its length, 1/3 its length, 1/4 its length, etc. This produces what is called the harmonic series -- the same series one learns about in math or physics classes. In the OP example, an ideal guitar string vibrating at 130.815Hz would also be vibrating at 261.63Hz. Thus, ...


0

The frequency of C4 is (or should be) exactly twice that of C3. We call both of them C, as they do sound similar. The simple fact is that contained in most sounds are harmonics. That is, other pitches which are related to the original pitch. The first harmonic, moving up to higher notes, is the octave (which for C3 is C4). The next is an octave and a fifth, ...


0

Time signatures generally accomplish two things: they suggest a pattern of strong and weak pulses (and relative strong and weak pulses), and they define the notation for those pulses. Each "measure" contains one sequence of the pulse-emphasis pattern. Simple meter The most basic patterns are two-time (strong weak | strong weak) and three-time (...


0

By asking what key includes a pair of chords, the answers are as previously given. However, there is more flexibility if you ask what scale contains a pair of chords. In that case, 02fentym's answer provides the mechanism. Lay out the notes of your chords in alphabetical order, as indicated. A B C E G# Now you can construct a scale that suits your purposes. ...


1

This is a genre-specific question, depending a lot on how deep into harmony the music we're talking about is. With pop/rock music, in general, the song is in a key, and the chords and notes are derived from that. As an example, Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama" is arguably in G, and the chords are D, C and G, and the notes you can reach for are ...


1

Now when the song changes chords(from D to F let's say), does the notes adjust themselves(from the D maj scale to the F maj) according to what scale the current chord uses? So after changing chords to F, rather than using the 3rd note in the D scale(which is F) do we use the 3rd note in F(so we play A)? Or do we stick to the D scale and play the F note again?...


0

"Now when the song changes chords(from D to F let's say), does the notes adjust themselves(from the D maj scale to the F maj) according to what scale the current chord uses?” Simple answer: yes. Chords are built according to the scale of the root note, regardless of the key in which the chord is utilized. So an F Major chord is always F, A, C (1, 3, 5 ...


1

I can't open your link, but the notation is wrong, as you suspect! It would most commonly be written in one of these ways: (The fifth note in the third line should of course be an A!) There's another - simpler - way to notate it if the style of the piece is jazz-influenced, but it looks more slip-jiggy to me.


1

As it stands, the question is a little confused, but here goes. Generally speaking, notes in a bar with one chord will reflect the make up of that chord. If they don't, either they or the chord is in the wrong place. Using diatonic notes and diatonic chords - all of which will be made up from purely the notes belonging to that key, there are so many notes ...


2

Conventionally, a triplet is played so that its three consituent beats take the time of two "normal" beats. So as notated, you're right; each of those "triplets" consisting of an eighth and a sixteenth note would be played in the same amount of time as two sixteenth notes. Which means that all of your bars, as notated, are three eighth ...


2

C or D I suppose. But, particularly if this is on piano, it might actually be HARDER to play in a different key. The 'all the black notes' keys can fall very nicely under the fingers, just as well as an 'all the white notes' one. Self-taught pianists often 'busk' in G♭ and D♭ majors. Maybe you're more scared of D♭ major than the students would be!


1

'To preserve the original feeling' - any key. As, on piano, all notes are part of 12tet, and to most people, a transposed piece will sound the same in any key. Most will not include those with absolute pitch, or those who would be aware that it's been transposed by something like half an octave. My suggestion would be to transpose to key D major. In fact, ...


1

What instruments? C major is close and has the simplest key signature. D major is also close, and is easy for beginners on stringed instruments because there'll be plenty of opportunities to play notes on open strings (G, D, A, E).


1

Far and away the best way to start is to find a good local piano or keyboard teacher who can guide and instruct you. They can give you far better guidance and instruction than anything you can get from this forum, YouTube videos or books.


7

The key signature for the first five bars of the clarinet part is wrong, although the notes are correct for A clarinets (they are playing in E major). The clarinets change to B-flat from the 11th bar, and there the key signature of three flats is correct. It looks like the composer, or a copyist, or the publisher found it easier to put the three flats in ...


0

Following Brian's answer - muta means change instrument for one that transposes differently - change the crook on a horn; put down the A clarinet, and use the B♭ one instead. B is actually what most of the world calls B♭.


0

The answer to the question needn't involve creating a new type of articulation. Perhaps the tempo change actually occurs earlier, and your bar 100 should look more like your bar 105, using 16th notes rather than triplet 8th notes? Or instead, if you look at bar 99, are you certain that the rest at the end of the bar is precisely a quarter note? Perhaps you ...


5

The score I found says muta in B after the clarinet entry at the start of the second movement. Clarinet in A would perform the written G sounding as a concert E which fits nicely in the opening E major chord. On the second page of that movement the clarinet parts are now marked for Bb clarinet, and the key signature is still three flats. The key signature ...


0

This was common in the 16th century, especially among English composers, although the "minor scale" had not yet been developed as a theoretical concept. The usual pattern was for the flat seventh to be the upper neighbor of the sharp sixth, however, not of the flat sixth. For example, in D minor, one voice would have B-C-B against another voice's ...


0

First and foremost - any music theory is just that - theory. It is certainly not a set of rules to be followed faithfully. It's a selection of ideas that have been found to work fairly consistently over many centuries. Guidelines, if you like. Brief potted history: the natural minor scale notes match the relative major notes - every single one. That left a ...


2

A bit more information would be needed in this case. If the melody is descending, the question of mutated sixth or seventh steps generally doesn't arise. If descending to step 1, a melody generally goes through step 2 (from 3) so the raised 7 will go well with step 2. (One reason that a ii065-i64-V7-i sounds so good.) If the melody descends through lowered ...


1

You don't HAVE to use the Melodic Minor scale coming down You don't HAVE to write a descending melody using the 6th and 7th degrees of the scale over a dominant chord. If you dislike the sounds these choices make, there are other choices! You could channel your inner Gershwin (or Hendrix) and do this of course:


2

The ascending melodic minor in C has A & B natural. Descending it has Bb & Ab. But these rules are needed when you're learning scales, not when you're writing something. How does it sound to you? It can sound very expressive. It looks like you've come across what are called false relations. The Wikipedia article may help. Generally false relations ...


3

You are correct that the flat 7 against the natural 7 would create a dissonance. For that reason, composers would generally avoid the situation. The purpose of the leading tone is to draw the ear toward the tonic. That is why the seventh is generally raised in minor -- to create a strong pull back to the tonic. But when descending, that pull toward the tonic ...


1

Pinpointing a specific emotion in music is a fraught endeavor. Maybe it's "sad"... or maybe it's "ennui"... or a hundred other shades of grey on a spectrum of emotions. I think it's simple enough to say generically it's emotional. It is expressive. Both in the vocal part and the guitar part. It's also in a slow tempo. Slow tempo and ...


-2

'Keys' are a very basic concept, suitable for getting your bearings and knowing which notes you should be sharpening/flattening. But to say that a song is in a particular 'key' is often quite a simplified description of its tonality, and not necessarily a good guide to how something is going to 'feel'. If you are familiar with classical music, you may see a ...


2

I will venture a mix of reasons, which I won't claim to be scientifically justified but I think substantially account for this experience. The two-step 19edo semitone (~126cents) is closer to the familiar 12edo semitone (100cents) than the one-step 19edo semitone(~63cents), although both are quite far off. However the two-step semitone is considerably closer ...


0

What’s the difference between a G7 and a G major seven chord? You have made an error which may be adding to your confusion. You should write and say G major seventh. The word major does not apply to the G, it applies to the seventh. You may be thinking G major (seventh). Instead you should think G (major seventh). In other words it is an ordinary G chord ...


1

The difference is in the size of the seventh either major or minor. A major seventh chord has a major seventh above the root. A dominant seventh chord has a minor seventh above the root. The exact spelling of the tone of the seventh above the root using sharps/flats will depend on the placement of the chord in the key. The seventh chord built on the tonic is ...


1

Harmony: G maj7 (GBDF#) is a stable chord and can be used as a tonic or subdominant. (In classical music it is very seldom as tonic, but as IV7 in the key of D it is quite usual). G7 (GBDF) has a tension for resolving to C (CEGC) - (because of the tritone F-B) and has a dominant function, this means it is functional quite different from G maj7. This theory ...


1

G7 is shorthand for G dominant 7 chord. GM7 would be for your G major 7. Gm7 for G minor 7. Most chord labels are shorter if the chord is more widely used. There's only a general preference for major. You can see most here on my site: https://pianocheetah.app/practice/chords.html (if a mod wants to copy that directly onto stackexchange, I'm cool with that)


4

There is a naming convention for chords. G = G major, or X = X major where X = any note, the triad is (1, 3, 5) G- = G minor, or X- = X minor for any note X, triad = (1, b3, 5) When it comes to 7ths just a '7' indicates a dominant 7th chord and that has a flat 7th. G7 = G dominant 7th = (1, 3, 5, b7) = (G, B, D, F), this is the V ("five") chord in ...


8

The difference is the kind of 7 you use. A "regular" G7 (also called a "dominant seventh" chord) is a G-major chord with the minor seventh added, so it's G B D F. A "Gmaj7" or "GM7" is a G-major chord with the major seventh added, so it's G B D F#. (For the sake of completeness, Gm7, or "G minor seventh", is ...


2

Both have the basic G major triad as a base. G, B and D. Since G7 (G dominant seventh) is the most commonly used 7th chord, it is called by its friends simply G7. It's diatonic in key C major, and has the addition of F♮. GM7 (G major seventh) has the addition of F♯ instead of F - the major seventh note in key G major. Thus it's a G major triad with the major ...


0

Beside scales what have you been playing for 3 years? You should try to have a mix of drills, memorizing pieces, sight reading... and IMO improvisation. All of which can be geared to the beginner level. The reason for the question has to do with application of scale studies... What I need to do with the major scale? In most real music full or multi octave ...


0

Here's a video that gives you something to do with the major scale in all 12 keys.


5

One thing is to take a simple tune in a major key, and sticking initially to one key, try to play it all over the neck, using the shapes and positions you say you've learned. Then play it in different keys, all over the neck again. Not from the dots - which will only be in one key, but using your fretboard knowledge. Another is to use 1,3,5 (and maybe 7), to ...


2

With some very esoteric exceptions, songs are not generally written in a particular tuning system. It's very common for sheet music of popular songs to be simplified (or for performances of popular songs to be embellished, depending on which came first in a particular case). Therefore, it's quite likely that "the singer adds to the song a little ...


1

There are already some short answers, I'll try a longer one. You'd like to understand what happened. If you can do the following: (1) deal with or operate in the situation adequately (2) locate or recreate the situation at will (3) identify similar situations in other contexts (4) maybe even communicate and describe the situation to others ... then you &...


-3

The theory that the Minor Scale starts with the letter A is plausible. However, has anyone thought of the fact that on a piano C is just the middle key (which we refer to as "Middle C") on the keyboard--half the notes are above it and half are below. It has nothing to do with Major or Minor key signatures.


2

The chorus starts on a major chord. The root of that chord then drops a half step to create the mediant minor. Then the major chord returns before finally landing on the dominant. So Ab → Cm → Ab → Eb The core of the progression is the alternation across chords between the scalar root (Ab) and leading tone (G). X:0 T:Overwhelmed T:Chorus harmonic analysis C:...


3

...Some kind of chromatic walk-down? I think so. Depends on the voicings and what you're reacting to that sounds "good." I played... xx0222 320002 2x2220 1x2210 020000 ...to get a lot of half step movement. In some cases you might call Fmaj in the key of D major borrowed or even a chromatic mediant depending on how it is used. Alternating D ...


2

Yes, a chromatic walk-down. And that's a full and sufficient justification. Always remember, the diatonic notes are a framework, not a restriction. And not every chord demands a scale.


2

Yes, it's a chromatic walkdown, and F major 7 is ♭III7, borrowed from the parallel minor. It's difficult to stick a functional label on that chord, but it's certainly valid to view the flattened third scale degree as leading to the second.


2

An interval is the distance between any two named pitches, regardless of context. So, F and G are a major second apart from each other no matter what context they appear in. In a melodic interval the notes sound consecutively. In a harmonic interval the notes sound simultaneously. In terms of their relationship to a tonic pitch, that is thought of less in ...


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