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2 votes

where does the dominant IV7 (ie; F7 in the key of CMaj) come from?

It's a chromatic chord. It comes from the blues. That is good and sufficient reason! It COULD be V7 of ♭VII, but it almost certainly isn't doing that! Yes, its notes occur in the parallel minor ...
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1 vote

What are equivalents to literary theories for music?

Yes. But over the centuries European music theory there are many people and treatises that can be names. Probably one of the biggest names to look into, especially in terms of linking ancient music ...
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3 votes

What are equivalents to literary theories for music?

German philosopher Theodor W. Adorno (1903-1969) wrote extensively about music. He was a member of the Frankfurt School, and heavily influenced by Sigmund Freud, Marxism, and Hegel's dialectic. He was ...
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0 votes

where does the dominant IV7 (ie; F7 in the key of CMaj) come from?

So, I'm learning to get "outside" chords, by borrowing from parallel scales. If you're deliberately borrowing chords, then IV7 could be the subdomiant seventh chord in minor when the ...
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1 vote

where does the dominant IV7 (ie; F7 in the key of CMaj) come from?

There's a daily barrage of questions just like this - or strongly relating to it. Glad you're getting into 'outside' chords, but trying to find their raison d'etre is somewhat unneccessary. However - ...
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0 votes

How do I identify chord scales? (Chord scale theory)

...I just wish there was a chart that has a complete list of all these specific chords because I'm genuinely confused. It's confusing because chord/scale charts - at least all the teaching material I ...
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1 vote

where does the dominant IV7 (ie; F7 in the key of CMaj) come from?

1.In a Blues the minor 7th (Eb) of F is a blue note (minor 3rd of the tonic). Usually it may resolve to the root note C (passing tone D). If this Eb resolves to E we can analyse it as D# - deriving ...
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3 votes

where does the dominant IV7 (ie; F7 in the key of CMaj) come from?

If you are looking for the source of the IV7 you only have to look at the parallel Dorian mode. That is where the IV7 chord exists in its natural habitat. It is also a V/VII (from the parallel minor) ...
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3 votes

where does the dominant IV7 (ie; F7 in the key of CMaj) come from?

Long answer. I guessed and extrapolated what you might mean, so this could be off by a mile. If by "F7 in the key of C major" you mean a style like blues where everything is a dominant-...
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0 votes

where does the dominant IV7 (ie; F7 in the key of CMaj) come from?

Well, the question is how strict you want to take this. The big problem with embedding F7 into the context of C major is that F7 is inherently linked to C minor, as it features a prominent Eb, which ...
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1 vote

How do I identify chord scales? (Chord scale theory)

The other answers have captured the essence of the process very well, so I'll try not to repeat. In the earlier stages you are more likely come come across chords such as you have asked about and they ...
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2 votes

How do I identify chord scales? (Chord scale theory)

I haven't had to study the chord scale theory (for which I am very greatful), but this is how I understand that the concept has to be, in order to make any sense. You don't have to know a proper name ...
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2 votes

How do I identify chord scales? (Chord scale theory)

The idea behind chord-scales is that given a chord there is a scale that contains the chord tones, plus pitches that fill in the "gaps" between chord tones. Given a Cmaj chord, a C major ...
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3 votes
Accepted

Can you use both diatonic major and minor scale with any mode?

'Only supposed to' is the key! So many questions on this site seem to feel that music theory is music law, and to contavene that is bad. Music theory is basically based on what actually has been found ...
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1 vote

Which version of notating dynamics for woodwinds is more clear?

Both versions are problematic. The first version, as you noticed, is imprecise as to the timing of the piano mark. The second version could be interpreted as asking for a rearticulation on the ...
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0 votes

Why Seven Principal Tones?

Here is a conjecture: It's about what is considered the smallest useful interval. In Pythagorean tuning, intervals are built up from octaves and fifths. Suppose we start from C 256 (and C 512) and go ...
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11 votes

Which version of notating dynamics for woodwinds is more clear?

No.2 if you want the 'p' to start exactly on the third beat.
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1 vote

The relation between making a note from "pitch & duration" and "name & octave"

Just to state the absolutely obvious. Pitch: The frequency of the sound wave. Same letter pitches imply a power of 2 relation between them. So to compute the physical frequency f you'd calculate: f = ...
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1 vote

The relation between making a note from "pitch & duration" and "name & octave"

As far as I understand this Mingus does identify a note with the pitch, but not with the duration. You can then add notes, rests and chords along with some duration at some time to a bar, as given in ...
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2 votes

The relation between making a note from "pitch & duration" and "name & octave"

Mingus must have a way of indicating duration. Note name and octave are a way of specifying pitch. JythonMusic specifies pitch as a numeric quantity corresponding to a MIDI key identifier. Tables ...
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1 vote

The relation between making a note from "pitch & duration" and "name & octave"

In music theory terms, pitch and duration are independent elements. Knowing one gives no information about the other. In Mingus, note names and octaves are considered as separate elements defining a ...
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0 votes

Borrowed Chords?

With questions like this, we have to decide whether to answer the question literally, as if it could be taken literally and as if it was written by a professional (who wouldn't actually even need to ...
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1 vote

Is it really necessary to learn the Number System in Music?

You use the numbering for two main reasons: To show the relative relationship of chords, because those relationships function the same regardless of what key you are in. ii V I is basically doing the ...
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1 vote

Borrowed Chords?

I can see you sort of duplicated an earlier question, but you asked it a bit differently here, so I'll give an additional answer. Example (C major scale) but i choose to play D major and F minor ...
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2 votes

Music theory? Parallel chords

I think you may be mixing up the terminology of English and German music theory along with confusing borrowed chords and parallel keys. If you are in the key C# minor, the tonic chord will be a C# ...
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0 votes

Music theory? Parallel chords

The 'home chord'? A is the home chord in key A, C♯ is the home chord in key C♯ - majors or minors. It appears you're trying to follow some sort of 'rule', but which one isn't clear. And what has the ...
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1 vote

Borrowed Chords?

Borrowing means using chords from the same root, using the scale notes' letters. So while the root notes of chords from C major go C D E F G A B, using the letter names, the chords from parallel C ...
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1 vote

Is it really necessary to learn the Number System in Music?

I play bass in worship team of our church for several years. I have to say it is necessary. I was learning modern piano when I was 8, it was a quick lesson that teach you only in number system, no ...
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1 vote

Is it really necessary to learn the Number System in Music?

It's very useful to know, and if you have good relative pitch, it's a no-brainer - it's just understanding how to verbalize and write down the relationships between pitches that you already understand....
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1 vote

Is it really necessary to learn the Number System in Music?

From a jazz perspective - although a lot of pop musos benefit from it - it just makes life a lot more simple. You probably are half way there already. Knowing I (1), IV (4) and V (5) of most keys. ...
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6 votes

Unconventional key signature: sharps on F & G only?

Normally you might expect a C# along with the F# and G# in the key signature. But there's no C# in the key signature because there's no C# in the (student's part of the) piece! The only F#s and G#s in ...
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2 votes

Writing Key Signatures for Polytonality/Frequent Key Modulation

Frequent Key Modulation Whether you use one key signature or many key signatures for a passage that frequently changes keys often depends on genre. I've read at least one Music Stack Exchange answer ...
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13 votes
Accepted

Is it really necessary to learn the Number System in Music?

As a bassist who has played predominantly jazz for decades I can say understanding and being comfortable with the number system is necessary if you want to progress to be an advanced player. Here are ...
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6 votes

Is it really necessary to learn the Number System in Music?

Necessary, no, but the number system has become the de facto common language for jazz players. It's convenient, because it describes sounds regardless of the key. Naming the chords/notes themselves is ...
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3 votes
Accepted

Writing Key Signatures for Polytonality/Frequent Key Modulation

Polytonality with a single key signature In a truly polytonal piece — meaning a piece in two or more keys simultaneously — it's really the composer's choice. For example, in George Gershwin's "...
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0 votes

Should I continue my classical study (avoiding parallel 5ths and octaves)

My answer is a counter-question: Why do you want avoid parallels? Make your music sound interesting by using both effects! Before this rule in western music came up we had only voices in unison and ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Should I continue my classical study (avoiding parallel 5ths and octaves)

The "classical" voice leading stuff you are thinking of - avoiding parallel fifths and octaves, etc. - is classical music's link to the old Church style and counterpoint. When that historic ...
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1 vote

How do you write a chord that has add#9, add-9 at the same time?

You ask what the notes are. F (root), A (3rd), C♯(aug5), G♯ (♯9) and G♭ (♭9).
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2 votes

Should I continue my classical study (avoiding parallel 5ths and octaves)

Should I continue my classical study (avoiding parallel 5ths and octaves) Avoiding parallel 5ths and octaves is useful for keeping the number of apparent independent voices constant. It is a genre-...
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2 votes

Should I continue my classical study (avoiding parallel 5ths and octaves)

Yes, keep up your studies. While you may not use some things directly, the principles can be useful. As mentioned in Dom's comments, parallel fifths and octaves are avoided in order to keep musical ...
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0 votes

Should I continue my classical study (avoiding parallel 5ths and octaves)

Pop music does not adhere strictly to the common practice era rules of voice leading. A very clear example is power chords, which are exactly parallel fifths. Having a solid knowledge of classical ...
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0 votes

katapayadi sutra - some melakarta raagas' numberings that I can't understand

When I pronounced them aloud I realised that the choice of consonant when two are involved in a single syllable is made according to the following rule: The pronunciation involves a halved consonant (...
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1 vote

What is the music theoretical basis for this chord transition?

It's an A maj aug 5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minor_sixth That part is just bouncing between a Dm and A maj. The F is just carrying over to the the Dm7.
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2 votes

What is the music theoretical basis for this chord transition?

It's Dm A/C# Dm7/C with the F5 held during the change through A/C#. With C# and E in the outer voices and an A included it has all the tones and movement of Dm: i V6, and I think that progression ...
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3 votes
Accepted

What is the music theoretical basis for this chord transition?

Your chord is a combination of an A/C# and a Dm chord. I wouldn't give it a name. The composer wants the whole passage to sound like it continues to hammer out Dm chords, but they also want the ...
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0 votes

Chord progression question

I have a slightly different way to look at this. It's D - E - F#, with F# being the tonal center, and the relevant trick that makes this interesting is alternating between F# major and F# minor sounds....
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5 votes

Chord progression question

Call that F♯maj7 rather than G♭maj7 and it starts to make more sense! I'm hearing F♯ as the tonal centre. It's not a functional progression. Just F♯maj7 approached by a couple of similar-shaped ...
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0 votes

3part counterpoint 4th species fusion resolving note appearing in other parts

As I see it, your bass in fourth species is suspended and only reaches its C on the second half of the bar. The restriction about having the note appear in another part is also sometimes waived if ...
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