New answers tagged

1

Say I'm playing along to a jam track in C major. From my understanding, this means that C Ionian, D Dorian, E Phrygian etc. would work. Well, no. I mean C Ionian is CDEFGAB, D Dorian is DEFGABC, and so on, so it would be the same notes, but the chords would be different. Cmaj, Fmaj and Gmaj with would be allowable chords in D Dorian, but if they're all the ...


1

My question is: How do I bring out the flavor/characteristic of the specific mode? By emphasizing characteristic notes. For modes of a major scale these are: lydian: #4 and 7 ionian: 4 and 7 (though careful with 4!) mixolydian: 3 and b7 dorian: b3 and 6 aeolian: 2 and b6 phrygian: b2 and 5 locrian: b2 and b5 For example, if I wanna make my solo feel ...


4

A full backing track has SO much more harmonic power, with bass and harmony instruments, it rules and bulldozes over your feeble little solo notes. If the backing track is playing/vamping on C major, there is no way for a soloist to make it sound like D Dorian. BUT if the backing track is playing C major and none of the backing instruments play an F note ...


0

You're correct that a jump of 3 semitones might be a minor 3rd or an augmented second. But this isn't a free alternative choice of spelling. Depending on context, one or the other will be the RIGHT spelling. Let's look at the C harmonic minor scale. I've marked two places where an interval of 3 semitones occurs (no matter that they aren't consecutive ...


0

I dislike most claims of absolutes in music. Virtually anything you can do in or with music can have some sort of justification in it's use. Then even if you can find no theoretical justification for it, you can still use it and possibly make great music with it. There simply is no rules, there are some common practices though. People must understand for ...


2

The chart you show is only telling half the story. Intervals are more than just a certain number of semitones between two notes. But that's all the chart tells. Intervals also need the names of the two notes - or where they're written on the staff. True, each interval will have at least a couple of names - we could even stretch that top one to augmented ...


2

In a non-tempered tuning, the intervals C-G# and C-Ab are not identical. (Voices, and strings, and some other instruments will often produce different sounds for these intervals.) With the interval C-G#, the spelling is that of a fifth and the # indicates that the fifth is augmented (perfect intervals only have augmented and diminished versions). The ...


1

C to G♯ is an augmented fifth. Mostly you'll have C to A♭, though, and it will be a minor sixth. In other words, the spelling matters. The fact that it would be an augmented or diminished interval if it were spelled differently isn't particularly relevant. What matters is whether it's an augmented or diminished interval when it's spelled correctly.


0

Sometimes two chords contain the same notes, but have quite different harmonic functions. Sometimes the 'wrong' chord symbol is used for (probably mistaken) convenience. For instance, take the common progression Bm7(♭5), E7, Am. A standard 'cycle of 5ths' progression. Some publishers seem to think a m7(♭5) chord is 'hard' and prefer to call it Dm6. ...


4

This is a little hard to answer, because Hindemith was (somewhat famously) idiosyncratic, inconsistent, and unclear with his own theories and analyses. But I’ll answer the best I can. Throughout this answer, I’ll reference three texts in addition to Hindemith’s own Craft of Musical Composition (Unterweising im Tonsatz): The Music of Paul Hindemith by David ...


3

This passage is unnecessarily complex in my opinion but he is talking about the natural 6th of F minor, not the diatonic b6th of F# minor. A m7b5 chord can actually be considered a 3rd inversion of a m6 chord, case in point: Fm6 is F Ab C D Fm6 3rd inversion is D F Ab C Dm7b5 is D F Ab C, identical to Fm6/D The chord in your diagram is this chord, but with a ...


1

So the original m7 is F#m7 chord, am I right? You are correct: the original chord is F#m. Then we create F#mb5: F#,A,C,E (C=b7 of F#). (When I read your question I was relating a minor to Am as I recognized the shape of the Am chord 123 on the 2nd,3rd and 4th string.) The minor 6 quality must be referring to Am6, ( A,C,E,F#) and I pretend the author is ...


2

It's unusual, but it's possible. Here's an example of a slur between two notes of the same pitch in the Tenor part of Francis Poulenc's Gloria III:


2

I think the basic theory idea you are looking for is that each tone of a diatonic scale (exluding TI and MI) can be chromatically altered, raised a half step, to become a temporary leading tone to the diatonic tone above. And importantly, only that one altered tone is needed to create the secondary dominants. These alterations can be inserted into ordinary ...


1

To the title- yes. For any given melody, there will usually be several different chords that will sound good under it. If you know F7 (or FMaj7) sounds good under it, then chords that share notes with FMaj7, such as Am, are likely candidates to also sound good under it. To the question in the body, it depends what your goal is. If you want to play the ...


0

Keep the F in the left hand. The melody would generally be moving more than its harmonic counterpart. Many of the right-hand notes would not be F. Something needs to describe FMaj7 (what I believe you really meant) consistently. Otherwise, you would be right in saying that it's A-Minor.


3

The underlying problem that leads to "hidden fifths" (or "hidden octaves") comes from the historical performance practice of diminution — "filling in" the spaces between two notes some interval apart. The idea is explained by Fux: Josephus [the student]. — What kind of mistake have I made?... Aloysius [the teacher]. — ... You ...


3

I think the answer depends on both a) whether you mean a dominant triad, a dominant seventh, or both; and b) the style of the music in question. If you mean a dominant triad only, then you're correct: by calling it a dominant, you are implying that this must be V, and therefore you're implying what tonic (I or i) must be. But as Bennyboy mentions, the ...


1

I think it really depends on how you define "simple" in terms of this inner-voice chromatic line. It sounds as if you're equating simplicity with smoothness—that is, how much a line moves. Since the line consistently moves the smallest interval in common Western music, the half step, the line therefore must be simple. But I would argue the opposite:...


2

You have parallel thirds in the example, which is not verboten. When we say parallel 5th or octaves we mean this. I'm specifically referring to the octaves between the bass and the tenor voices. When you have chord repetition then the repeating of the same octaves or fifths is also not considered parallel. So in other words the first picture is bad, this ...


4

This is a very convoluted rule, and it's tough to explain succinctly. But the notion of "direct" (or "hidden") fifths/octaves is this: If two voices move in similar motion into a perfect fifth or perfect octave, the upper voice must move by step; only the lower voice may leap. In the overwhelming majority of cases, this guideline only ...


2

The dominant chord is so important as a key-defining chord that it's the only 7th chord referred to just like that: V7. It also happens that (something like) the minor 7th is the next overtone in the harmonic series after octave, fifth, and major third. In other words, it works not only as a functional tone, but as an extension of harmonic texture. So yes, ...


1

With just a B♭ ( other notes all naturals), the parent key will be the major one with that one flat. That's key F. Since your scale/mode starts on the second note of the F major scale, and incorporates all the same notes, it is called the G Dorian. Each of the modes has exactly the same note pattern - TTSTTTS, just starting at a different point in that ...


0

That would be the G Dorian Mode, a mode consisting of the steps W H W W W H W.


4

When the motif is sequenced in mm. 3-4 the joinings result in a descent of a fifth between beats... ...one way to explain the countersubject descending a fifth instead of ascending a fourth in m. 5 is it reflects the descending fifths of the preceeding sequential line. For the dotted rhythm you can look at it like this... ...the main motif starts with an ...


2

Basically, you are hinting at a A7sus4 chord, but the method you describe to get there is the issue. I think this description... ...add a 9th to a subdominant IV chord... and this one ...in D major...adding an A to the G chord and losing the 3rd...You would have the notes G A and D. ...are presenting some contradictory ideas that are part of the ...


1

(As mentioned in other answers) the triplet sounds like a smooth 3-beat bar; because it's written as a triplet (rather than as a 3/4 measure with a slightly slower tempo), this structure is useful as a contrast to a piece written in 4/4 with a 4-beat bar (or 2-2 with a 2-beat bar.) The other measure sounds more like a 3+3+2 additive measure than a division ...


12

Beyond the obvious - the two rhythms are different - it helps to have some context on the history and use of the second rhythm. The second rhythm is often known as the tresillo and is historically popular in Latin American (particularly Cuban) music. It is however African in origin, having been bought to the Americas by slaves. More recently the tresillo has ...


8

I don't know why we're getting such complicated answers/comments to this simple question. The triplet is a smooth rhythm with three equal notes. The other is a more jerky, syncopated rhythm. They're not just different 'in theory'. They're similar but different, period. Like apples and oranges are both round fruits, but they're DIFFERENT round fruits. ...


7

I'm confused by some answers. These are different rhythms entirely. Triplets have three evenly-played notes, and two dotted eighths + 1 eigth = 3 + 3 + 2 beats. I'd use the first if I wanted 3 identical notes. I'd use the second if I wanted a more syncopated feeling.


-1

The difference is: they are not the same at all, like you say in the triplets the length values are equal while the dotted example the 2 first notes are longer than the third! When apply the different notations? In my ear I hear two different stiles: The triplets I’d use to indicate for a legato or tenuto interpretation, extending to rubato in a slower ...


16

The following are the exact same rhythms you posted, but each one is divided into smaller values and they are placed on top of each other to make the comparison easier. As you can easily see, the two notes you said don't fall at the same beat. They are slightly off. This is because in the case of the triplets, you divide the beat by 3 (and play the first ...


1

would adding an A to the G chord and losing the 3rd make the chord dominant? You would have the notes G A and D. Not really. The main issue is the note D, which clashes with the leading tone, C#. Presence of notes A and D in the same chord suggests the root isn't A. Some other people suggested it might be interpreted as A7sus4 – yes, maybe, but this doesn't ...


1

No, changing the chord quality via suspending the second of the chord is not going to make it dominant. But with that said, placing that A in the bass would make a strong case for reinterpreting the chord as a different type of dominant chord: [A G D] is nearly [A G B D], which would be G/A or A9sus, a suspended dominant chord. Gsus2 is a fairly ambiguous ...


1

Adding a 9th does nothing but add a new note to an existing chord and that does not make it dominant. You have more than one alteration to your chord not indicated in your title. Namely dropping the 3rd. You can add the 9th to the IV chord and have a G add 9 = (G B D A). If you drop the 3rd you have a suspended 2 chord (G A D). This would most likely ...


0

A dominant chord is generally made from the root of the dominant note in a key. In key D, the dominant note is 5 - A. Just adding A to a chord can't make that chord dominant. The dominant chord there is A C♯ E, with G added to make it a dominant seventh.There are also secondary dominants, but this is unlikely to be one here. And dominant chords do not have ...


4

There are two especially important implications of Bach's choices here: The lower D in the right hand (labeled [1]), serves to provide a continuation of the stepwise motion initiated in the previous measure's left hand. Harmonically, the C is being transferred to the right hand (beat 2) for resolution downward to B (beat 3). The dotted C is because Bach ...


2

Chords are not defined simply by the notes in them; rather, they are defined by their musical role. So adding a 9th to a subdominant chord ... it's still a subdominant chord – subdominant is a role. However, ignoring the original name of the chord, a chord (in the key of D) containing G, A, and D could easily sound like a Dsus (tonic) or an A7sus4 (dominant) ...


2

Can we transform any harmonic music to melody? Most European music that has harmony uses the harmony to accompany a melody, so yes, we can play the melody by itself. In fact, you can find song books of European music that contain only the melody. These often have chord symbols that indicate the harmony without using a grand staff, but that is by no means ...


0

The main criticism against Roman Numeral Analysis (RNA) regards its foundational premise. Although RNA appears to clarify the music by naming each chord within a key by its scale degree value (I, ii, IV, etc.); this does not actually amount to any understanding of how chords are related to each other or what the chords mean within a given key. The lack of ...


4

The last chord of bar 21 is a secondary dominant, leading us to the first chord of bar 22. The second chord of bar 22 is actually an augmented sixth chord. Notice the fact that the C flat is spelled as a B natural, which is in the 1st violins, which then resolves up to the C. On the other hand, the D flat in the cellos and basses resolves down to also a C. ...


1

Some think that C7 (for example) belongs to key C. It doesn't. It belongs to (comes from, is diatonic in) key F It's the dominant chord in that key. As such, by 'stacking thirds', the interval between 1 and 7 (C and B♭) is m7. In actual key C, the 'stacked thirds' give the interval between 1 and 7 (C and B) as M7.


1

By definition. C7, F7, E♭7, etc. are "dominant seventh" chords, which have a minor seventh. A "major seventh" chord is notated differently: CM7, Cmaj7, or CΔ7.


1

Roman numeral analysis (RNA) has a variety of limitations — such as in analyzing non-Tonal music — as outlined in other answers. However, there is a specific and ongoing "controversy" among music theorists with regard to RNA. Beginning in the mid 1980s, a number of influential theorists began constructing what is now known as neo-Riemannian theory, ...


0

What is bad about Roman Numeral Analysis? I don't actually recall hearing criticism of RNA, but there are things I dislike about it. There are several, incompatible notation standards. E.g. wikipedia lists: conventional notation, alternative notation, chord symbols (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_numeral_analysis#Diatonic_scales) and Jazz/pop numerals ...


3

The chord below G is G7 but without the 3rd (B) in it. It hints at the B in the notes running up to it (B-C). Tr is short for Trill the act of playing 2 notes repeatedly and quickly. You're struggling because it calls for the 2 weakest fingers to pull off this particular trill (4,5). Play it slowly and your fingers will eventually obey you :-)


4

'Tr' means 'trill'. Play the note and the diatonic note above it alternately. As in DCDCDCDCD, quite fast, while the lower two notes are held only for the short quaver shown. I'd be playing it with two hands (left hand is doing nothing else), so E and G l.h., trill,r.h., whichever fingers you are better with - the suggestion here is 5434, but there are ...


0

This has been discussed since the 1200s without coming to a unanimous conclusion. In practice, the minimum rather than the breve seems to be the main pulse note. I have read various places that the big revolution (really a 200 year or so evolution) was the improvement in musical notation. As notation became able to show more complex rhythms and pitches, the ...


-1

I recommend looking at music as an alternation between the influences of Apollo and Dionysus (look up this term, it's very important in the arts). Apollo is the sun god, and the god of music. In art, Apollo represents formalism, intellect, and artifice. Apollo represents GREEK ideals. Dionysus is the god of wine, and of nature. In art, Dionysus represents ...


2

Start by copying more than emulating. For example, do a thorough chord analysis of a piece you want to emulate, come up with your own subjects/motives/themes that are the same length and character as the piece you are going to almost-copy, then develop your new material following the exact same chord progression as the original. Make your almost-copy the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included