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3

Triplet eighths are 2/3 the duration of a real eighth, so if you don't want to put every note in a triplet you can also give all notes a scaled duration. So your music would be \relative c' { gis8*2/3 cis e gis, cis e % etc Remember to remove any other explicit durations so that implicit durations prevail from the first note here.


12

The notes in the upper staff are tuplets. As an aid towards your eventual goal, here is some sample code to create what you're looking for: \version "2.19.82" musicA = \relative c' { \key cis \minor \time 2/2 \omit TupletNumber \override TupletBracket.bracket-visibility = ##f \tuplet 3/2 4 { gis8_\markup { \italic { sempre \dynamic pp e senza ...


8

The notes on the treble clef are triplets. That's all.


1

Better to think larger sometimes. 3.5/4 is like seven beats over two measures. Doesn’t make sense to think in one measure increments if it’s meant to be felt over two. It’s definitely situation specific, but I’d say be on the lookout for the possibility that it makes more sense than it looks like.


1

The modern approach is to use precise tempos in bpm in which case 3/2 and 3/4 can be exactly equal by just changing the bpm and playing 3/2 twice as fast to become the same as 3/4. Traditionally, before metronomes, note values were an indicator of tempo. Rhythms with longer values were performed at slower tempos. So 3/2 would be a slower tempo that 3/4. For ...


3

3/2 time gives the impression of a slower piece. 3/4 is 'normal' (whatever that is!) and 3/8 gives the impression that the piece is quicker. Only because three minims, being 'longer' notes, take twice as long to play as three crotchets. Obviously at the same bpm/tempo. But - play 3/2 at 150bpm, and it's the same end product as playing 3/4 at 75bpm. So, ...


1

To be honest, there's no real difference. I believe old hymn notation used half-notes a lot more than nowadays. Perhaps it was easier to write in the old days of quills, as minims (full notes) are easier to "draw" than the more complicated notes with stems( i.e. crochets/quarter notes, quavers/eigth notes, etc.). Potentially 3/2 gives the reader an ...


1

For the most part: the best way I explain it my lead guitarist; (Who plays as well as Chet Atkins did, but my guy can't read music); is to just think of it as a waltz no matter what and follow my bass guitar. I have only noticed it wrote that way in hymnals usually. They use 6/8, 9/8 and so forth to control the layout of the music to fit one or two pages at ...


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