New answers tagged

1

In 6/8 the beat is a dotted quarter. So dotted quarter=72 IS 72 beats per minute. If you mistakenly thought 'beat' (as in b.p.m) always meant 'quarter note', that should be sufficient answer. But perhaps this question refers to a very basic sequencer program that DOES think that, one that only counts tempo in quarter notes? Dotted-quarter=72 equates ...


1

Dotted crotchet =72bpm. That equates to two clicks per bar, each click meaning three quavers. If you set the metronome to three times that - 216bpm, it would be six clicks per bar - one for each quaver, were there six played in a particular bar. HOWEVER - a lot of metronomes, especially mechanical ones, won't quite reach that. And it's manic! So set for ...


4

The time signature 6/8 is compound duple. There are 2 beats in a bar, and these are dotted crotchets (dotted quarter notes). These beats are subdivided into three pulses that are quavers (eighth notes). So if the tempo is given as a dotted crotchet = 72, this means there are 72 beats per minute, and (3x72=) 216 pulses per minute. You would set a ...


2

The two existing answers are correct and helpful. I just want to add, in case this wasn't clear to you: In general, in a 6/8 meter, you can either think of the eighth notes as the beat, in which case there will be six of them in a measure; or you can think of the dotted quarter as the beat, in which case there will be two of them in the measure. (Actually,...


9

What would this be in bpm? It would be 72 bpm. The fact that the metronome setting is given for the dotted quarter note indicates that each dotted quarter note is one beat. Besides, 216 bpm is far too fast to be practical. And does 6/8 change anything? Aside from the meter, no. For example, if the metronome mark were the same in a 3/8 or 9/8 or 12/8 ...


1

In 6/8, the dotted quarter is the basic tempo object. Thus one plays the piece with 72 dotted quarters per minute or 216 eighth notes per minute.


14

As mentioned in the other answer, it is convention, but there is a bit of logic behind the convention. A time signature of 3/4 is taken to mean that there are three quarter notes in each measure, so the fact that there are six eighth notes in a measure of 3/4 follows from subdividing each of the three quarter notes into two eighth notes. Logically, a time ...


8

It is convention. The two are different, even though mathematically they contain the same amount of notes. In 3/4, the count is 1-2-3,1-2-3.Simple time. Thus, as you state, there would be 3 beats, each containing two quavers. Since 6/8 is compound time, it will be written out differently. It's basically two 'beats', each comprised of three quavers.So it's ...


1

I would do it differently. Eighth rest, eighth note tied to quarter note tied to half note. (I can't post graphics easily.) The suggested pattern avoids breaking any "normal" divisions and makes sight reading easier.


5

There are actually four possibilities: IMHO all of these are acceptable, although I find the first one easiest to read. The third one looks unneccessarily complicated and the fourth looks a bit 'unusual', but would probably be a good choice if there was half a page of this rhythm.


3

Brief answer: time signatures were not really standardized until the 20th century. Schubert used one of the many variations still seen in his time for this unusual meter, which is basically what we would write today as 4/2. For some more detail, originally C was used in the late renaissance typically to indicate what we'd now think of as a 4/2 or 2/1 meter,...


2

Not sure if this will satisfy the "good music" requirement... ...Yesterday by The Beatles famously has a seven bar phrase length. "Examples" is plural, so at least one more... ...Eleanor Rigby by The Beatles uses a five bar phrase length. Notice that both examples are phrase lengths of uneven counts in common time. It's not part of the question, but ...


0

Moonlight In Vermont has a 6 bar A section. Also many popular songs (I Got Rhythm for instance) have a 2 bar "tag" towards the end which breaks up the usual 4 bar thing a bit.


0

Las ketchup's "Aserejé", which has been a super-mega-hit back in the early 00s, does runs of six measures during the chorus. Not sure if this qualifies as "good music", but surely is a non overtly experimental thing, and people found it enjoyable back then.


2

It's not clear whether you mean to exclude all classical music or only classical music that employs irregular meter. In case it is the latter, I offer this example: There is a lovely trio sonata by Buxtehude (opus 1, number 4) whose first movement is a chaconne built on a three and a half measure long bass.


1

As a former string quartet professional, I'd also go with option two. Yes, it's the beat that matters, and this most clearly and simply conveys that. Regarding key, it depends on the sonority you want from the strings. Keys with lots of accidentals tend to somewhat mute the sound of the string instruments. This has to do with the sympathetic vibrations of ...


2

Option 2 for the tempo indication. It's the beat that matters. You're saying 'quqrter beat becomes dotted-quarter beat'. Probably what the players would assume, but good to spell it out. No, I wouldn't inflict 6 flats on a string quartet! In this age of free-ranging and even atonal music they are quite accustomed to playing any notes in any order at all. ...


6

I agree with @Dekkadeci that this option is a good option: That kind of change is common and easy to understand. @Caters Now regarding the key signatures. E♭ minor is fine on piano because it can fit the hands very well. But as you indicated it is not so nice on the strings. Why not make the whole thing a half step lower by changing the keys to D major and ...


7

I'd use your second option: metric modulation relative to the quarter note. With no notation at all, the unwritten convention I've witnessed is actually to assume a quarter note (or an eighth note, etc.) has the same tempo value throughout, so 2/4 to 6/8 does indeed have the duple meter feel slow down. On the other hand, at least there aren't many ...


1

2/2 time means that there are 2 beats per measure and that the half note gets the beat. Counting 1-2-3-4 won't work since there are only 2 beats in the measure. In 2/2 time "1" is the first half note, "2" is the 2nd half note. Quarter notes would be counted "1 + 2 +" and 8th notes would be counted "1e+a 2e+a" or rather like 16th notes in 4/4.


1

2/2 time is pretty well the same as 4/4 time, as far as counting is concerned. Just count 1&2&3&4&, using quavers for each of those 8 counts. It must work. I hope you're not getting the stems up and stems down mixed up. They all have their own counts, but where there is one of each, on top of each other, that's only a number or its ...


3

According the Extremes of Conventional Music Notation list maintained by Donald Byrd: Shortest duration for a tempo marking: Quintuplet 64th note = 75 in Stockhausen: Xi. Runner-up: 64th = 288 in Crumb: Madrigal no. 1, from Madrigals, Book IV (1971). There's no record on that page for long notes in tempo markings, though it does mention at least one whole ...


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