New answers tagged

2

Since the clarifications in the comments, I should point out that as far as I can tell, the ideal solution isn't possible in Guitar Pro. If all that matters is the audio playback, then whatever gets the right result is fine. But ideally, you'd be able to insert a repeat "inside" a measure. You don't want to wind up with a measure of four beats plus ...


5

You can change the time signature for that single bar. Something along these lines:


0

Some time signatures have been given names - you've identified them correctly so no problem. Others don't have specific names, but you can still use them when composing if the music goes that way. You haven't said why you need to know the names. Personally I've never bothered with the names since I stopped taking theory exams, and I thought them a waste of ...


2

I am firmly in the Compound Duple camp when it comes to 6/8 etc, however as a conductor and music teacher I have come across some 'modern' music where the time signature 6/8 has been taken quite literally as 6 8ths. That is normally when the time signature is varying between numbers of 8th notes in a sequence of bars such as 4/8; 5/8; 4/8; 6/8; 4/8 etc. The ...


2

...Where does that slash come from? It's not a fraction. The slash doesn't mean fraction or division necessarily. The symbol has many meanings depending on context. Here on SE the slash is pretty commonly used, like 4/4. In a context of musical time I think several things would be understood: 4/4, 4|4, or even 4:4, although personally I wouldn't use a colon....


0

I'm just adding some detail re. @MichaelSeifert's answer. The first measure is confusing, but the values all add up to a full measure. But because the major beats aren't notated in the OP's example it's hard to read. Below is how I got the final notation step by step from two major dotted half note beats, to quarter note subdivision, eighth subdivision, ties,...


3

It's not a fraction. It's a time signature. Time signatures evolved from fractions. The fractions were applied to the mensuration signs that survive now only as 𝄴 and 𝄵. (No, the symbol 𝄴 does not come from the first letter of "common.") In the French Baroque, time signatures such as 2 and 3 were common. There is absolutely no reason for ...


2

Behind Bars does not appear to address this directly. However, even in paragraphs of text, Gould consistently prints time signatures as two numbers stacked on each other, in bold face, exactly as they would appear on a staff.


2

The second measure is fine, but the first one is wrong. The general rule is that your notes should never cross the "major beats" of the bar. In 6/4, the "major beats" are two dotted half notes, and so the double-dotted half note that crosses this boundary is needlessly confusing. Instead, use ties to "restart" the note at the ...


1

I'm 95% certain, especially from your answer (which you could change to a comment) that your advisor meant 2/2.* A measure of 2/2 and a measure of 4/4 could look identical; both might have, for instance, 4 quarter notes in them. So what's the difference? That has been covered more than once here. My favorite half-joking explanation is "the only ...


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