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1

You can figure something like this out. By definition the lower number indicates the type of note that gets ONE beat. I prefer to keep it as a fraction. So common time, 4/4 is the same as 4 quarter notes, 4*(1/4). We have 8th and 16th but we do not have 1/12 notes in standard music notation, unless it's something new. So I am not even sure I can ...


1

It is: BPM divided by top number of time signature = number of bars per minute. As long as the BPM corresponds to the bottom number of the time signature you don’t need it. If the BPM corresponds to a group of notes, say 3 notes in 9/8 then divide by the number of groups per measure, in the case of 9/8 it’s 3. 60 seconds divided by number of bars per minute ...


0

The term "compound time signature" typically refers to a time signature which has some number of dotted quarter notes per measure; the duration of each dotted quarter beat three eighth-note beats. So a 6/8 time signature would be two dotted quarter beats, each consisting of three eighth-note beats. In 3/8 time, the act of multiplying the three eighth notes ...


3

Time signatures are not fractions nor can the be multiplied like fractions. They indicate two things: the number of beats per measure and what size note gets a single beat. Thus 3/8 indicates that measures are three beats long with an eighth note getting one beat. Historically, time signatures also carried some tempo and style information but that convention ...


4

The bottom number in time signatures refers to the kind of notes involved - 4 is equivalent to crotchets, 8 to quavers. The top number refers to how many of those are contained within one bar. So 3/4 means there are three crotchets per bar, and 3/8 means there are there quavers to a bar. Simple - it's simple time. Compound times are so called because they ...


1

It is quite common practice to note groupings in the time signature, like 2+2+3 over 8 instead of 7 over 8.


2

I’m with @meganoob on the first piece, it sounds like a 4 bar motif with a syncopated 2 bar 8th note rhythmic pattern in 4/4 time. As for the second slower piece, this I hear as 3+2+3, not 3+3+2. The notes of the basic pattern fall on 1,3,4,6 so the last note on beat 6 is a 3 count. I hear this as 8th notes in slow 4/4, about 53bpm. You could also could ...


1

Some of the above answers have done a great job of breaking this questions down, so I'm going to keep it simple. The way I think about time signatures is about feeling. For instance, if I'm playing in 3/4, then there are three pulses per bar made up of a quarter note for each pulse. If I'm playing in 6/8, then its two pulses per bar with each pulse made up ...


2

I think a lot of it is how you feel the pulse of the music and in what tempo. For the first tune, if you feel it in bars of 4/4 at around 126bpm, the repeated melody is in 8th notes and the motif is 4 bars long. However, if you feel it bars of 4/4 at half that tempo, the motif is 2 bars long and the repeated melody is in 16th notes. I have never seen 8/4 ...


3

There's a modern convention to notate bars that add up to 4/4 but have irregular 8th groupings as 8/8. Using the same logic I would notate this in 16/8. Using 8ths rather than quarters as the unit has the advantage of making it easy to show beat groups by beaming. Some composers would state the groupings (as in my example). I'd consider this implicit ...


1

In printed music a metronome marking is usually given as, for example, crotchet = 120, meaning 120 crotchets (usually crotchet beats) per minute. It sounds as though your software works out what the beat is (crotchet, minim, whatever) based on the time signature. In that case you would get the same sound from 4 minims in 4/2 time and from 4 crotchets in 4/4 ...


1

The lower number in a time signature usually defines beats. So if it's 3/4, the count will be 3 of the note called crotchet, (quarter note). The b.p.m. stated will usually be with reference to that beat note - in this case, crotchet. So, with a stated bpm of 60, the pulse will be counted at the rate of one crotchet per second, and three of them will fill ...


6

With irregular timings, there's two ways (at least!) to write them out, so they're easily playable. One is to work out where the pattern repeats, and make that length one bar. So with something like 123 123 12, it's pretty straightforward to call it 8, if that pattern continues. If it doesn't, it's hardly a pattern! The other way is to write out (using my ...


1

As so often in music, we're going to struggle to pin down a Theory of Everything. No, I'm afraid a bottom number of 8 doesn't always imply Compound Time (3-groups) and one of 4 doesn't always imply Simple Time (2-groups). 6/4 is Compound Duple - two dotted half beats. (We use 3/2 for Simple Triple - three half-note beats.) 2/8 and 4/8 are ...


2

Both 3/4 and 3/8 can be Simple Triple (three beats in the bar) or Compound Single (one beat to the bar). Textbooks don't mention Compound Single much, but it happens all the time in real music - a fast 'one in the bar' waltz. A close relation of Compound Duple, a 6/8 (or 6/4) two-in-a-bar. Historically, using 3/8 rather than 3/4 didn't necessarily imply ...


16

There are two separate voices, both add up to 3/4.


8

To clarify what the other answers have already said: it's just a condensed form of writing X:1 L:1/8 M:3/4 K:G %%score T A B V:T clef=treble V:A clef=bass V:B clef=bass % 1 [V:T] f2 A2 ^c2 | d6 | d2 GF G2 [V:A] z6 | z6 | z2 D4 [V:B] D2 F,2 A,2 | D2 D,2 C2 | B,4 B,2


4

Imagine there are three musicians. One plays the top line - all the treble clef notes. Another plays all the bass clef notes that have downward pointing stems. And the third plays only in the third bar (that's all that is written for him) and he plays a rest followed by a D note for two beats. That's it. It will sound exactly as written. Reasoning is that ...


0

You effectively have two separate lines happening in the bass cleft in bar 3. On the first beat the B sounds by itself. On the second beaet the D is added while the B is held. On the third beat the B is played again while the D is held.


1

Neck on the line here! It could have, quite conceivably, been written in 3/4. Double the value of each note, and it will fit fine. It's usually played with such rubato that the 12/8 rhythm becomes a little lost anyway. By splitting each bar into four separate bars, it has to work.


1

well, 3/4 and 12/8 are completely different to start with. You seem to know that Compound time is counted differently (from the comments section), You have to understand that Time Signatures, although only used to keep time most of the time in a non-classical context, matters significantly in genre of music. Not just in counting but also the way music is ...


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