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26

Great question - I remember when I myself was confused about this very same thing many years ago, and indeed at first, it all seems completely random. In order to answer your question, there needs to be a little background: Historically, thinking about music in terms of harmonic progression is one that has really only come to complete prominence in the ...


16

The two different tabs are the same chords, the first is an "easy" one for beginners, and is correct according to videos of Ritchie Blackmore and Steve Morse. It's an inversion with the 5th as the lower note, and the root an octave high. You can get away without it in the bass position, as your bass guitar provides a strong root (and rhythm) throughout. The ...


12

The premise isn't really true, since such hexatonic scales are actually very common in folk and country music. In particular, the “missing ⅶ scale” 221223. An important source are Scottish tunes, e.g. X:1 T:The Athole Highlanders L:1/16 M:6/8 K:D V:2 clef=treble |: A6 A3FD2 | A3FD2 E3FG2 | A6 A3FD2 | E3FG2 F3ED2 | A6 A3FD2 | A3FD2 E3FG2 | Ad3A2 B3AG2 | ...


11

But what about modern day tonal music? I have played around on my piano with chord progressions that break all of those "rules" and if you'll forgive me for taking the risk of sounding cocky, I sound amazing! I daresay you do! However, while you may be breaking those rules, you're probably obeying newer ones. As time moves forward, more styles are ...


10

There's no specific passage. Gould suggests that Gibbons introduced the idea of modulation (as we'd call it in tonal terminology; Gibbons had no word for it). In a mode, you don't "change keys" as such: you just finish one piece, and then start chanting another in a different key, ahem, mode. That's why, in the middle of a piece of Gregorian chant, you ...


10

The major contemporary competition for Schenkerian reduction theories of pitch space is what is known as "Neo-Riemannian" theory, or NRT for short. NRT begins from the notion that chords -- and by extension key areas -- can be understood as moves on a kind of chessboard of tonal relations, where each move is a tonal interval (most usually the fifth or fourth ...


9

The author seems to be actually attempting to connect all the keys and it may be unintended that there are keys that are disconnected as in the paragraph after he starts talking about modulation and changing keys. When and if the key of the music changes-- a process called modulation-- this will always be from on the circle to another... This can be more ...


8

No. The intervals chosen for ear training don't have to based on the tonic of a song. 1 up to 6 (Do up to La) is a major sixth just like 5 up to 3 (Sol up to Mi) and just like 5 up to 1 (Sol up to Do) is a perfect fourth just like 1 up to 4 (Do up to Fa). You can take any relative interval for training it really doesn't matter if it is the tonic or not ...


8

It's basically a power chord riff with the roots following the G blues scale. Rock music is often a mixture of major, minor, blues, and modal tonalities. Also what baffles me, there are two ways to "add notes". As Dr Mayhem says, the second tab simply adds another root note an octave below.


7

"methods for constructing a musical motive" For me, it doesn't work like that. A melody comes to me, and in retrospect, I find the motives. I can't really explain how that works, a motive is just anything that I recognize as a distinct unit - some kind of pattern. Whether something is a pattern is to some extent subjective. Melodic and rhytmic properties ...


7

I have often used graph paper to create a left-to-right timeline where each cube of the graph paper represents a unit of time (say 5 seconds, or 15 seconds). I then "draw" the form, sometimes getting carried away with colored pencils and such. I then try to compose the music in-line with the formal diagram. This doesn't always work and sometimes leads to ...


7

This is what I was taught and have used regarding Tonal Plans: A ****Tonal Plan**** is a framework in which you consciously decide specific tonalities for sections of a given composition. For example: Here's a really straight-forward tonal plan that follows the typical conventions of sonata-allegro form: Exposition Theme 1: C Exposition Theme 2: G ...


7

The tonic (or the tonic interval or tonic axis, in some modern music styles) is alike a star, which all other sounds gravitate towards. These relationships are in part acoustic and part psychoacoustic. Generally, the tonic will be overemphasized over a section or maybe an entire piece, all formal points of stability will be based upon its presence, and you ...


6

I think it goes without saying that there are a lot of different approaches to creating meaningful chord progressions, but I wanted to share a useful "trick" I learned while taking music theory in college. This trick does not require an extensive knowledge of theory, so it is an easy way to get started creating progressions that sound good and have some idea ...


6

One of the first things to observe is that the tritone F#-C should be avoided, because it suggests a dominant sound (leading to G). Consequently, don't use the II7 chord (D7 in the case of C lydian), and don't use IVm7(b5) (F#m7(b5) in C lydian) either, because both contain the tritone. Note that the triad II (D major triad) can be used. Progressions in ...


6

First off, you're not quite getting the point of the things you are bringing up. Parallel fifths and octaves looked down upon it counterpoint not because they sound bad, but because in counterpoint you want all your melodies to be independent and parallel octaves and fifths make your melodies interdependent. The dominant 7th came into popularity due to the ...


6

Wow, those two columns seem pretty pointless, seeing as they are completely the same everywhere except when they’re blank. It seems like it must be referring to the fact that it’s the 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 7th scale degrees that provide the different colors of the modes, while the 1st, 4th and 5th are more stable, foundational tones. For example, the major and ...


6

Several tendencies combine to produce the feeling of a tonic. First, the tonic is often the first note of a piece. In the accompanying harmony, notes supporting the tonic occur at phrase endings and the end of the whole piece. The tonic is often the most common the note of a piece but this isn't necessary; sometimes other notes are emphasized, the fifth or ...


5

The riff is just (part of) a harmonized blues scale. All melody notes (as correctly shown in your question) are from the G (minor) blues scale: G Bb C Db D F The harmony is a fourth below the melody. This can be seen as an inverted power chord (the fifth dropped down one octave), or, equivalently, as the top two notes of a three note power chord (root-...


5

It should also perhaps be mentioned that the hexatonic scale derived from a chain of perfect fifths is probably not often found, because Pythagorean thirds sound so bad. And in the hexatonic scales derived from removing the second note of the major scale (CEFGAB), you can have two chains of perfect fifths, F C G and A E B, with A and G separated by 10/9 (...


5

As you can see the phrase "Wake me up" is sung over an C major, but then it switches to a Cm As ggcg said, IV-iv-I is a very common cadence. It feels right because of the chromatic approach E-Eb-D (in G major key). hence has a d# note, but a d note is sung in the melody. This would sound dissonant, but by the time he sings D, only C and G are ...


5

I think he's got the right answer but the wrong reason. There's no problem hearing a tonic as 'home' in any of the modes. But tonal harmony is all about dominant-tonic relationships, about there being a chord that has a strong tendency TOWARDS the tonic. You need a major dominant chord, containing the leading note a semitone below the tonic, and all the ...


5

The pentatonic scale you've identified is A pentatonic minor. The force theme uses scale degrees outside of this scale. It's not really going to be possible to adapt any given melody to your kalimba's scale, but many melodies do use only pentatonic scales anyway.


5

In my opinion, the author is unclear here. (I'm beginning to get suspicious about Dr. Greenberg's book...) Here is the excerpt in question: This portion is, famously, an F♭-major triad with an E♭ dominant seventh above it. With no overlap between the two harmonies, this means that seven individual pitches are sounding simultaneously. (The non-...


4

All of the above answers are correct. We can generalize here: the rules that govern what is permissible in music evolve, both in cultures and in individuals. Bach is beautiful within and because of what is not allowed to him, and so is Patti Smith. You can make up your own rules. But there's no guarantee they will work for everyone or anyone else. If ...


4

"Furthermore, how do I know if a certain musical idea (i.e. A melody and its accompanying harmony) will work if I were to just notate the music without plucking it out first on my piano?" You cultivate your "inner ear". An essential facility for any composer, arranger etc. Before there was Common Practice harmony, there was Organum. NOT using parallel ...


4

Not in my experience as a music teacher. Perfectly intelligent students, upon being presented with such a cluster, will look at you in incomprehension and/or suggest various different pitches as the tonic.


4

If you listen to the whole song, it's clearly based in the key of G. Note that the C chord that ends the final 'repeat to fade' loop always leads back to a G chord. Also note the D chord in my example is a pickup, the chorus progression actually starts with the G chord on 'fat'. The bVII chord is so common in pop and rock as to hardly need a modulation or ...


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