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1

My two cents is that I believe I can feel when I have D'Addario because they feel better than Ernie Ball Slinkys. I don't believe for a moment that there's a profound difference in sound, though. There's likely differences to be told between the different alloys used in the windings, but I haven't spent the woodshed time and string money to catalog and ...


2

For classical guitars, strings make a significant difference as they are the major source of the sound. A lot depends on what you like though. I personally prefer slightly tighter strings as I like to feel the pull of the string and therefore the "pull" of different intonations when plucking. My brother (we have both played since young) prefers ...


13

Brand doesn't matter at all, in my opinion. Most of the big names do make their own strings (contrary to some rumors you'll hear on the internet) but they're all using the same processes, similar or identical machines, and probably exactly the same materials - because wire drawing is somewhat specialized, and the volumes of guitar strings isn't that big ...


6

I do think the type of string can have an effect on how a guitar sounds. With the huge variety of strings on the market (even a single company might have dozens to choose from for just one type of guitar) unless you have super deep pockets and way too much time on your hands your best bet is to just take a stab at a few general brands, alloys, and gauges to ...


3

Position and string sequences don't change, you just have to figure out how to translate the MIDI note numbers to note names, which will let you build your own fret maps. Note names themselves are a repeating sequence where one octave starts at C and ends in B, to start the next octave index at C again. This can be modeled with an array of ordered note names....


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