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1

This seems like two questions in one. The intonation on a classical guitar is always going to be somewhat approximate as the saddle can be considered 'one size fits all' or 'set and forget' at best; you can't alter the individual string lengths on a classical guitar. Polishing will change the diameter of the bass strings slightly (assuming you only polish ...


-1

The term for the meaning of the 7 alphabetical letters used for the notes and their pitch respectively for the steps of the key scales is "absolute note names" corresponding to the fixed do in opposite to the "relative note names" corresponding to the movable do, (the alterations marked by sharps and flats for the 5 halftones used for the 12 keys and the ...


1

The vernacular term is Note. Regardless of technical nuances, all musicians know what "note" means in the context you are referring to. IMO nothing more is necessary. Another term, not particularly technical, that you'll find in the introduction to every theory book, is Musical Alphabet, when referring to the group at large. However Musical Alphabet ...


2

Historically, the idea to identify pitch with a letter or solfege name is part of an idea called: gamut. But I think that meaning is really a reference to the whole set in connection with diatonic pitches. The modern term for a pitch and it's related higher and lower octaves is: pitch class. D♭ is not a separate tone (it is one of the possible ...


2

I agree that there is a lack of a good term. Note is a poor choice, not only because, as you say, "notes have pitch, not the opposite," but notes also have duration. If asked, "what are the notes?" You could just as easily answer, "whole notes, half notes, quarter notes..." as "A, B, C..." I don't think there is a formal term, though "note letters", "white ...


0

Well, if you are really talking about the set (in strict mathematical sense) which the entities C, D, E, F, G, A and H belong, the answer will be the scale - because it's a set of notes (in your case it will be C major, as well as A minor, H Locrian etc.). But you probably have meant the other thing — speaking in the language of computer science, the ...


2

Thickness affects tone. Thickness of strings, too BTW. The smoothness of the pick's edge affects the noticeable string noise. Some players prefer minimal string noise on their attacks for a smooth sound (similar to the well-sanded fingernails of most classical guitarists). Some players like the string noise on their attacks. In this regard it's truly player'...


1

slighly distorted, yet very clean and fat tone Sounds like a general Blues tone. On any amp or FX circuit, look for a "gain" or "overdrive" knob/function. If you have a circuit with "pre" and "post" gain options, you can turn the "pre" down and crank the "post" to overdrive the tubes naturally. On a Fender Blues Junior tube combo these are called "master" (...


4

As mentioned, this is a technique for finger style classical guitar. There are two types of stroke: tirando, or free stroke apoyando, or rest stroke Both are valid techniques and guitarists are encouraged to learn both. Some people think that rest stroke is "easier" but in realty neither is easy for a beginner and either can produce a strong full volume ...


2

Conceptually, it's playing a particular string, and stopping the stroke as the plucking finger reaches the next string - generally the one higher, physically, on the guitar. Thumb obviously works the opposite way. Tonally, I don't think it makes much if any difference. It's useful in that the finger doesn't stray far from the strings, and if the next note ...


4

what is it? In classical guitar technique, a rest stroke is when your finger plucks the string and comes to rest -- hence the name -- on the next string over. I assume the idea is the same regardless of which style you're playing. how does it affect the sound? The most obvious effect is that it will mute the string your finger lands on, if it was ...


2

I think there are 2 main reasons to be talking about n-TET scales: You're interested in finding a scale which matches just intonation more closely than 12-TET, thereby preserving the practical advantages of equal temperament while improving upon 12-TET's out-of-tune-ness.* You're interested in composing music with an unusual or exotic sound, so you're ...


1

You should probably use a standard notation such as this image from the Wikipedia page on equal temperament and the "N-TET" scales. Take note of the "- " and " +" markers which indicate shifts from the 12-TET Western scale pitches.


1

Since there are 7 pitches per octave, and you have 7 letter-names, I'd say it's OK to do what you're already doing, because anything else would be less convenient. A temperament with 7 pitches per octave doesn't distinguish between major and minor intervals. For example, between major thirds and minor thirds -- every third is two steps and every step is 1/7 ...


3

Fluorocarbon have a harder, more direct response and feel, and less of a “singing” tone. In some sense, switching from nylon to FC has a similar effect as switching to a longer scale length. For an electric-guitar analogy: it feels like switching from a Les Paul to a Strat (though obviously the difference is not so extreme). Most of that difference is just ...


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