6

Did'll is clearly the way to go. Count on it taking LOTS of hours to get you there. I used to practice in the car on long driving trips.... did-ll--di-dll... etc. For HOURS. Eventually this becomes LIGHTNING fast. I can do running 16ths on a g scale at a metronome count of over 200 beats/minute (800 notes a minute). Quantz "On Playing the Flute" is ...


4

I can only speak for the brass side of things, but the standard double-tonguing syllables are either "ta-ka" or some variant thereof. Variants include "ta-ga" or "da-ga," depending on the musical context. For instance, sometimes the "ka" syllable is too accented, so players conceptualize "ga" instead. Similarly, the "ta" may be much stronger than the "ka/ga,"...


3

Though Quantz's did'll is a good and working option, it isn't the only one. It seems to be used most when an especially fluid effect is wanted, and other tonguings may be employed when seeking for more separation between the notes. For a contemporary author's take on double tonguing on recorder (rather than on transverse flute), see van Hauwe's Modern ...


2

I went to an excellent seminar many years ago by Jiggs Whigham where he espoused his technique of "doodle tonguing" for fast, swung passages: the longer note being started with the tip of the tongue against the roof of the mouth near the teeth, slightly further back than normal tonguing, and the shorter one with the middle of the tongue against the roof of ...


2

I was taught to use the syllable "tooh" as it maintains ideal shape for your lips and oral cavity while keeping the tone focus. Using other syllables, such as "tuh" or "duh" spread the tone and change the shape of your lips and oral cavity. Regarding airflow, stopping and starting notes only by stopping / starting airflow is what we refer to as "huffing", ...


2

Ta-ta-ka is the standard, but the primary concern is that each tone receive its proper emphasis. So if this can be achieved with ta-ka-ta or even ka-ta-ta, then ultimately the technique is of less importance. I practice all three just because it's good practice. In performance I've always fallen back on ta-ta-ka. In the specific case mentioned, I use ta-ka-...


2

Cellist dropping in here. There are all sorts of mechanisms we have to use to ensure that the bow doesn't continue to play a note after it's over, doesn't start a note until it's time to start, and of course make a nice clean transition between notes. When reversing direction on a single string the main concern is avoiding a "skritch" which is generally due ...


1

All depends on the speed. If you can, I would single tongue as this generally produces a more "percussive" sound. However, if the speed is too quick for that, try and double tongue.


1

Yes, breathing and tonguing are effectively the same, though it's not as critical to do them well on melodica. You breathe through the mouth because you can take a full breath much more quickly than through the nose. Articulation is important to get a clean start to the note. Simply move your tongue as if you're saying "ta" To illustrate how important this ...


1

You're probably already doing something similar in adjusting your tonguing to the embouchure you're using for different notes, using a wider, more open lip position for the lower notes. If you're not, then you need to experiment with it, or you'll produce a sharper attack and therefore a different tone on the higher notes than the lower ones. To see the ...


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