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7

The key signature for the first five bars of the clarinet part is wrong, although the notes are correct for A clarinets (they are playing in E major). The clarinets change to B-flat from the 11th bar, and there the key signature of three flats is correct. It looks like the composer, or a copyist, or the publisher found it easier to put the three flats in ...


0

Following Brian's answer - muta means change instrument for one that transposes differently - change the crook on a horn; put down the A clarinet, and use the B♭ one instead. B is actually what most of the world calls B♭.


5

The score I found says muta in B after the clarinet entry at the start of the second movement. Clarinet in A would perform the written G sounding as a concert E which fits nicely in the opening E major chord. On the second page of that movement the clarinet parts are now marked for Bb clarinet, and the key signature is still three flats. The key signature ...


2

There no moral issue here. If it works for you, do it! Personally, as a keyboard player, I find the transpose function problematic. I don't have full-blown perfect pitch, but I know if I'm playing and the 'wrong' pitches are coming out, and find it unsettling. Particularly when past the stage of consciously reading notes but rather 'reading the music'. ...


2

I don't see a problem. Your EWI doesn't change timbre across its range, and your scale knowledge won't suffer, because you'll still need them for songs with chords outside the primary scale or with modulations. Think of it like putting a capo on a guitar.


1

The answer is about history and harmonic series, but it varies between Brass and Woodwind to some extent. Historically, Brass instruments didn't have valves, but were tubes of fixed length, with additional loops of tubing call crooks that could be inserted. These would allow the player to play notes only in a particular harmonic series, which corresponds to ...


0

There are a few techniques that will be helpful for transcribing this solo: Repeated notes: the most common way to deal with these is to rapidly change fingers on each repetition. Which fingers you use is largely up to your own ease of execution, but you can find some discussion at Proper repeated note fingering on piano?. Practice slowly to get comfortable ...


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