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Here's my take on this. Chords where you only play the three highest strings, and you do not play the bass strings marked with X. The chords are not in root position, except B, but I don't think that matters, because the notes are so high anyway. It's a bit like ukulele.


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If you're happy playing open chords as opposed to the barres involved here, take the song up by a semitone - most likely not going to strain any tonsils - and substitute as follows. G for F♯, D for C♯, Em for D♯m and C for B. Pretty simple and straightforward. The only drawback really being you won't be able to strum along with the track - ...


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Assuming the trouble for you is playing all barre chord, you can try playing the chord on 3 strings... F# xx432x C# xx312x d#m xx434x B xx444x You can't strum them in the way of open chords, but a broken chord pattern with pick or fingerpicking will work nicely.


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If you put a capo on fret 4 you can play three of the four chords using open chord shapes. F# at the 4th fret can be played with a 'D' shape: %x.x.0.6/1.7/3.6/1[Fmaj] C# at the 4th fret can be played with the 'A' shape: %x.0.6/2.6/3.6/4.0[C#maj] B at the 4th fret can be played with the 'G' shape: %7/3.6/2.0.0.7/3.7/4[Gmaj] The only slightly more ...


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I am not a professional musician, I just want to add something to the previous answers as a (tenor - B♭) saxophone player who deals with brass sections (trombones and trumpets mainly) reasonably frequently. My interpretation might be contrary to official and semi-official guidelines for brass/woodwind sections (I have no formal training or relevant degrees). ...


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For trombonists, the transposition (or not) depends on the musical context you're playing in: In UK brass banding trombones are treated as a Bb transposing instrument - parts are treble clef - see a written C - play 1st position (closed) and sound a Concert Bb In orchestral, big band, etc., trombones are treated as concert pitch instruments. Parts are ...


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Bb- and Eb-trombones are Bb- or Eb-trombones because they are actually transposing instruments like Bb trumpets or Eb horns and because they have this root tone Bb (or Eb) when played in closed (or zero) position. Some trombonists - are who are aware of this - can read music in C notation but then they mind that the C of orchestra pitch is position 5 (as if ...


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Baritone treble clef is a B-flat transposing instrument and sounds a major ninth lower than written. French horn in F is also a transposing instrument and when written in treble clef sounds a fifth lower than written (in bass clef there are two different conventions). The question is ambiguous, it's unclear what original key is intended. There are two ...


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The key resulting from translating a piece in the key of G Major/D Minor to an F instrument is D Major/B Minor. This key has two sharps at F and C.


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First thing you have to know: are this so called French horns in F or in Eb? Normally bands with Bb-baritones also use Eb-horns. In this case the answer is short and clear! As the Eb-horn is a 4th higher than the Bb-Bariton, the Bb-Bariton part has to be transposed a 4th down. Bariton is a Bb instrument like Cornets, Trumpets and Trombones. Bb ...


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There are French horns in B♭ (regards to Pyromonk) and F and more different conventions than for other instruments. Classical music is typically notated without a key signature, while concert band music uses it, different clefs are used in different regions (bass or treble), so it all depends...


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Here's the quick dodge for transpositions (as long as you know your key signatures!) E♭ baritone has three 'built-in' flats. It's 'in E♭' after all! So, to play music for an instrument 'in C' (i.e. normal untransposed piano, no 'built-in' flats or sharps) we have to take away those three flats. Which is the same as adding three sharps. So ...


1

It seems from your question that you want to play a song in C major on your baritone sax so you can play it in the same key as any accompanying instruments (that is, in "concert pitch"). To do that, you have correctly identified that you will be playing in the key of A major. You can do this at sight by imagining that the treble staff's bottom line isn't ...


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Saxophone are transposing instruments: Your instrument is called Eb-Sax because it plays an Eb when you play a written C. This means it transposes a minor 3rd up (and as a Bariton an 8ve down!) So you have to notate and play an A on your instrument when you want to hear C. (your instrument will transpose the A a minor 3rd up ...)


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Basic transpositions for sax,l trumpet etc Bb instruments (Bb clarinet, tenor/soprano sax, trumpet ...) Up one tone. C => D, F => G etc Eb instruments (alto/baritone sax) Down 3 semitones. C => A, F => D etc Players of transposing instruments need to know these by heart (and being able to do simple transposition more or less by sight is also ...


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If you mean that your written sax music will be in A, then you are not changing the key, as it would still sound in C. If you mean you want the song to sound in A, then that would put your sax part into 6 sharps!


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For the specified transcription 'up a P5', you either add a sharp, if there are any in the original key, or take away a flat, if there are any in the original key. Transcribing a minor will be minor in any new key; majors remain majors. If you're asking about any transcription to any key, it's a long answer, suffice to say use the original root note (with ...


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We don't do your homework for you here. But here are some hints: If you transpose a tune that is in a minor key, it will end up still in a minor key. If we're using key signatures, accidentals will be required on the same notes before and after transposition. Look at your Question 4. The 7th and 13th notes in the tune (I'm talking a simple count here, ...


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If you know enough to transpose the actual music, then you know enough to transpose the key signature: You knew that you transposed everything up by a perfect 5th, so transpose the key of C minor (three flats) up by a perfect 5th, resulting in the key of G minor (two flats). This means counting the tonic as one, which is easy enough to conceptualise: There'...


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