9

In the second picture there is more tension in the Floyd because the springs are pulling on the trem more. It also depends a bit on your string gauge and tuning. Say for example you have light strings (42 - 9) but play in Drop C, the strings will create very little tension compared to a 46 gauge in standard tuning. In the case of the lighter strings, you ...


9

It is not too ambitious, guitars are simple creatures and it takes quite some effort to do any permanent damage (namely excessive truss rod adjustment). Basically you slacken the strings then tighten the claw screws till the bridge is held hard up against the body and will stay that way when string tension is reapplied. You don't need to slacken the ...


6

Snapping strings has nothing to do with using a trem. A trem in the right position, will let you tune your strings quite happily to the right notes, so you have a separate problem here Aside from raising the trem up to gain more upwards movement, what else have you done? Are your tension springs in the same place, and is the tension bar screwed in the same ...


5

I don't believe that they are individually replaceable. I think you will have to order a complete replacement tremolo. See this site, which says: The knife edges of the trem become worn or damaged and require filing to get back to a proper knife edge. This is also rarely seen on Edge variants [except Edge3!] and some "mating" of the parts is ...


4

Due to the difference in total string tension, you will have to reconfigure the springs in the bridge so that it floats in the same position as it does now, so that your action and intonation is unaffected by the string change. This could take as little as a change in the angle in one or two strings, by moving them from different hooks on the anchor plate, ...


4

If you want to fix the bridge, there are two simple ways: Replace it with a locking bridge - my Hohner G3T has one of these. It is only useful if you really need to use it as a fixed bridge guitar. Adjust the spring tension to make the bridge into a divebomb-only bridge. To do this, increase the spring tension until the bridge lies solidly along the surface ...


4

Remember the rubber band guitar you made out of a shoebox when you were a kid? When you plucked the rubber band string, the walls of the shoebox got pulled inward from the rising tension of the rubber band. The same thing happens when you pluck a guitar string. As it is pulled and vibrating, the tension increases. As that tension increases, it causes the ...


4

I would take it off. I don't think it'll do much harm to your guitar if you leave it on, but your guitar is likely to be more out of tune when you get it out of the case. (Floating bridges are always more temperamental tuning-wise anyway. That's why I love my Telecasters; once the strings have settled they seem to require very little tuning - great if you ...


4

Some Strat. guitars have a small spring which is there to put tension on the bar itself - which is often quite loose in the thread. O.k., some players like it to swing down, but the point is that when the bar itself is unscrewed, there is a liklihood of the spring being lost. One Strat player I work with unscrews the bar, and screws in a small bolt with the ...


4

I'd be inclined to find a bit of plastic tubing - for aquarium use, or similar, that fits over the claws that hold the springs. Take springs off, add tubing, cut to length, replace springs. Ought to last a long time. Heat shrink would also do, but is much thinner.


3

The arrangement and number of springs determines how stiff the arm "feels" in use. There's a good description on this strat talk forum thread. With more "stiffness", the arm is a bit less sensitive - good if you rest your hand on the bridge and find this makes the pitch wobble too much. I used to use four springs (all fitted in a straight line) on my ...


3

From the Ibanez technical forum: The tremolo is held in position by two opposing tensions - from the strings, and from the springs in the rear cavity. You can adjust the position of the spring claw, by loosening and tightening the highlighted screws, to get the correct balance.


3

As pointed out, a washtub bass is what you are thinking of: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washtub_bass Though the most common way to play it is to pluck the string, I have seen it played with a cello bow. The sound difference is instead of a steady thump, you get a cello like sound, but with a more primitive rattle.


3

Turn the guitar over so the bottom is visible. There should be a plastic panel held on with screws. Undo the screws and take the panel off. Inside, there should be springs that connect the bridge and tremolo to a metal bracket that is like a claw. The metal bracket should have screws in it also that go through the bracket and into the body of the guitar. ...


2

Tremolo bridges are a bit more work to get setup just right compared to fixed bridges. From your photos, it looks like the there is too much tension from the strings, or not enough tension from the springs (in the back of the guitar). I say this because the tremolo is being pulled too far forward. Typically, the tremolo should look parallel to the body of ...


2

Here is the answer I found out at my own cost, at least this is the only way I could properly set up low action. The key was the angle of the bridge! I've been having issues with the EZ II since I purchased my Jem, and I even thought about reselling it as I suspected problems with the neck. No matter how I adjusted the truss rod, I always had fret buzz ...


2

Seriously, go nuts with it. This is how players like Eddie Van Halen got their sound. You might break a string here and there, but look into string brands that are made for this kind of treatment. You can do really cool things with this, too. Once I broke a string, so I just took the entire whammy bar, put it all the way down, and put it under all of the ...


2

You can go down until the strings are totally relaxed without any problem. Going up is quite tough on the strings, so it's up to you how much "risk" you're ready to take. Usually such systems are indeed set up such that you can go up by something between a whole tone step and a major third (on the high strings). So what you can break are your strings (by ...


2

The edge sits right in the slot underneath the head, but above the area that is threaded. Just like your last picture. Here's a nice diagram, scroll down to see it http://www.thefret.net/showthread.php/12486-Ibanez-Edge-Tremolo-Knife-Edges


2

This is fixable. It may be a simple fix or it may cost a lot, but it is fixable. The fist thing I'd do is loosen all the strings to take the stress off the neck then tighten the truss rod (meaning turn the truss rod nut clockwise) and see if that straightens the neck. Be careful not to tighten the nut so much you strip it or break the rod. If it needs a ...


2

You can also use an airplane flanger set to crazy. Check this video. Paul Gilbert also uses one for when he want his hard tail guitar to give him a dive bomb effect. Around 6-10 Here is another good video on its uses.


2

Made one! It's...pretty rough. And I don't have a bow. And it's harder to control than I hoped. And you guys are right; it only has about an octave of feasible range. But! It does kinda work, and science has been done. Thanks for your inputs.


2

Fret rattle is usually caused by a problem with the action. Either the neck relief is too little or the saddles are too low or both. As ggcg and Tim suggest, you can take it back to Guitar Center, especially if you bought it new. I expect they will be willing to do a free setup for you. If you bought it used, they might not include that in their services (...


1

Many years ago I built a one-stringed instrument which didn't have a whammy bar, but similar: you pressed the string down in a trough between two glass rods at the top of the neck, thus changing its pitch. While fun, it had severe limitations: the useable range was only about an octave, it was very difficult to control the intonation (especially at the ...


1

It turns out that in the FX pedal world, a tremolo effect is a stereo-panning effect. It has nothing to do with the definition of tremolo as I understood it (a volume modulation). So my original question doesn't actually make sense given my misunderstanding.


1

My ideas, in order from probably most effective to least effective, without regard to cost or convenience: Scrimp and save every penny and start trolling stores that sell used guitars, looking for something cheap with a Floyd Rose and even 24 frets if you can get both. It doesn't have to sound great, it just has to have the Floyd Rose. Float your Strat ...


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